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Introduction Regenerative medicine represents a broad field of therapies aimed at healing or replacing damaged tissues or organs. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a biological therapy within the regenerative medicine field; it is believed to

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

The duration of the incubation period for scrapie, a fatal transmissible neurodegenerative disorder of sheep and goats, is mainly determined by the Sip gene, which has 2 alleles (sA—susceptible and pA—resistant). A diagnostic test is not available to detect scrapie in live animals. We analyzed genomic dna extracted from frozen sheep brains collected from Cheviot sheep of the United States that had been inoculated with the SSBP/1 scrapie inoculum. Digestion of the dna with EcoRI or HindIII followed by the addition of a scrapie-associated fibril protein (PrP)-specific marker probe, yielded fragments of 6.8 (e1) and 4.0 (e3) kb, or 5.0 (h1) and 3.4 (h2) kb, respectively. Fragments e1 and h2 were associated with the histopathologic diagnosis of scrapie, and fragments e3 and h1 were associated with survival. A valine/alanine polymorphism within the PrP coding region that resulted in a BspHI site was further used to determine the genotype of these Cheviot sheep. Digestion of polymerase chain reaction fragments with BspHI resulted in an undigested fragment b– (0.840 kb), digested fragments b+ (0.460 and 0.380 kb), or both types of fragments. Survival time of b+/b+ homozygous sheep was significantly (P < 0.01) shorter (218 ± 26.0 days) than survival time for b−/b− sheep (> 700 days after inoculation). Results indicated that b+ and b− are markers for the Sip sA and pA alleles, respectively. The intermediate duration of the incubation period for heterozygous sheep (b+/b−; 342.9 ± 25.3 days) indicated that the Sip sA allele is expressed codominantly to the Sip pA allele.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Numerous cytokines and growth factors stored within platelet alpha granules are potentially effective at mitigating inflammation and initiating anabolic processes and tissue regeneration. 1 As a result, PRP products are commonly used in human

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

product for treatment of septic arthritis in those species would be advantageous. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous solution of concentrated platelets that contain anabolic and anti-inflammatory proteins or peptides. In veterinary medicine, PRP

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Autologous PRP is a biological product that has become an important treatment to promote tissue healing, particularly for tendon, ligament, and joint injuries. The main advantage of autologous PRP preparations is that they involve simple blood

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Locally administered autologous PRP has become standard-of-care practice to augment tissue repair in human medicine. Its clinical applications are diverse, including use for surgical sites, 1 venous ulcers, 2 and orthopedic injuries. 3,4 In

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

M usculoskeletal disease is a common cause of poor performance, days lost from training, and retirement from competition in the equine athlete. Orthobiologics, including blood-derived products, such as platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and autologous

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

5–11 in several species that alterations in the pH and extracellular iCa concentration of PRP can affect platelet aggregation in vitro, with aggregation typically impaired at acidic pH and lower extracellular iCa concentrations. In vitro analysis

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

that equine PRP has an increased concentration of growth factors, compared with that of whole blood or plasma. When incubated with superficial digital flexor tendon or suspensory ligament explants in vitro, PRP increases expression of genes of various

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

(MSCs) and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) have gained significant popularity for the treatment of musculoskeletal diseases in horses. 3 These therapies have been hypothesized to provide disease-modifying effects including increasing strength of repair with

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association