Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 812 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

-term administration of NSAIDs versus corticosteroids with leflunomide. Methods Case selection Medical records of dogs presented to Blue Pearl Pet Hospital Pittsburgh North diagnosed with IMPA and prescribed leflunomide were reviewed. Included dogs had

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Introduction Gastrointestinal (GI) effects of systemic NSAIDs are well recognized. The mechanism by which NSAIDs damage the gastric mucosal barrier is multifactorial but thought to be primarily via inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis. 1 , 2

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Phenylbutazone and flunixin meglumine are the 2 NSAIDs most commonly used in horses to reduce inflammation and pain associated with lameness. There is little controversy concerning their use for this purpose. However, they are also sometimes

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

antiinflammatory drug (NSAID), especially phenylbutazone (PBZ). 3 This putative pharmacological risk and the consistent predilection site in the right dorsal colon (RDC) could provide clues to the management of right dorsal colitis. Diagnosis is usually

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are highly effective for the treatment of a variety of common diseases in horses, including degenerative joint disease and colic. 1,2 The anti-inflammatory properties of NSAIDs are a result of COX inhibition

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

– 11 NSAIDs have been shown in both horses and humans in vivo to affect the concentrations of some cytokines and growth factors in blood-derived autologous substances such as PRP. 12 – 14 Based on this, it is possible that the administration of

Open access

The NSAIDs are used in a number of settings in veterinary medicine to control acute and chronic pain and inflammation. Most commonly, NSAIDs are used for managing chronic pain associated with osteoarthritis and acute pain associated with surgical

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are commonly used to alleviate clinical signs associated with orthopedic diseases; however, the effect of NSAIDs on the progression of osteoarthritis remains controversial. Evidence suggests that NSAIDs

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction NSAIDs are commonly used in equine practice to treat pain, inflammation, and fever. Effects of NSAIDs are mediated by inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) cascade, which consists of 2 isoforms, COX-1 and COX-2. NSAIDs have

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are widely used by horse owners, trainers, and veterinarians. The practice of combining NSAIDs has been empirically used to enhance the analgesic properties of these drugs in performance horses. The effect of

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research