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Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of and complications associated with prophylactic percutaneous laser disk ablation in dogs with thoracolumbar disk disease.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—277 dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of dogs with a history of thoracolumbar disk disease in which the 7 intervertebral disks from T10-11 through L3-4 were ablated with a holmium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser inserted through percutaneously placed needles were reviewed. Complications and episodes of a recurrence of neurologic signs (eg, paresis or paralysis) were recorded. Owners were contacted by telephone for follow-up information.

Results—Nine of 262 (3.4%) dogs for which followup information was available had a recurrence of paresis or paralysis. Follow-up time ranged from 1 to 85 months (mean, 15 months); signs recurred between 3 and 52 months (mean, 15.1 months) after laser disk ablation. Acute complications occurred in 5 dogs and included mild pneumothorax in 1 dog, an abscess at a needle insertion site in 1 dog, and proprioceptive deficits in 3 dogs, 1 of which required hemilaminectomy within 1 week because of progression and severity of neurologic signs. One dog developed diskospondylitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that prophylactic percutaneous laser disk ablation is associated with few complications and may reduce the risk of recurrence of signs of intervertebral disk disease in dogs. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222: 1733–1739)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare clinical outcome, healing, and effect of tracheostomy in conventional incisional and carbon dioxide (CO2) laser techniques for resection of soft palates in brachycephalic dogs.

Design—Prospective randomized trial.

Animals—20 adult brachycephalic dogs.

Methods—Dogs were randomly allocated into 4 groups, and 1 of the following was performed: palate resection by use of a CO2 laser; incisional palate resection and closure with suture; and palate resection by use of a CO2 laser or incision with tracheostomy. A clinical score for respiratory function was assigned to each dog at 0, 2, 8, 16, and 24 hours. Biopsy specimens of incision sites obtained at days 0, 3, 7, and 14 were examined. Data were analyzed to determine the effects of technique on clinical and histologic outcome.

Results—Mean surgical time for laser (309 seconds) was significantly shorter than for sharp dissection (744 seconds). Surgical technique significantly affected clinical scores at 3 of the 5 postoperative time points, but differences were not clinically apparent. Tracheostomy significantly affected clinical scores at 3 of 5 postoperative time points. After tracheostomy tube removal, clinical scores were similar to those of dogs without tracheostomies. Inflammation, necrosis, and ulceration were evident in all groups at day 3; these lesions had almost resolved by day 14. Most complications were associated with tracheostomy.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clinical outcomes appear to be similar with the laser and incisional techniques. Regarding surgical time and ease, laser resection of the soft palate appears advantageous. Tracheostomy is not warranted in dogs that have uncomplicated surgeries and recoveries. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:776–781)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

P hotobiomodulation therapy (PBMT), also known as low-level laser therapy, cold laser therapy, or low-intensity laser therapy is increasingly popular in human and animal rehabilitation. It involves the use of a device designed to deliver

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

In veterinary medicine, CO 2 laser technology can be used for skin incision, excision, and ablation. 1 Use of CO 2 laser technology in clinical veterinary practice has increased in popularity during recent years throughout the world. Carbon

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

has been considered the standard of care in human urology for the management of urolithiasis. 1–3 Lithotripsy is crushing or fragmenting uroliths by use of shock waves or laser energy. Types of lithotripsy include ESWL, EHL, and laser lithotripsy

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

It is accepted that onychectomy in cats is a controversial and painful procedure. 1–3 Attempts have been made to address these concerns not only with pharmacologic remedies but also in developing different surgical techniques (ie, laser

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Photobiomodulation is a nonthermal interaction of monochromatic radiation with a target site. 1 Monochromatic radiation is produced by lasers. There are different categories of lasers available for medical use. Low-level (cold) lasers are class 3

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Since as early as 1908, surgery has been recommended for rapid removal of uroliths from the lower portion of the urinary tract of dogs. 1 However, incorporation of laser lithotripsy may supplant this time-honored treatment. In 1968, investigators

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

increased ATP production and oxygen consumption in cells cultured in vitro, 9,10 which may be explained by absorption of laser light (wavelength, 600 to 1,000 nm) by cytochrome c, 11,12 a component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Further

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

of TCC by use of electrosurgery has been described previously but deemed to be unsuitable in female dogs because of a high intraoperative and postoperative complication rate. 13 Recently, debulking with CO 2 laser, combined with mitoxantrone and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association