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ligament rupture (CCLR) before and after tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO) surgery, to evaluate bone healing, percentage weight bearing (%WB), pain evaluation, and wound healing. 10 , 11 TPLO surgery is one of the most common surgical techniques to

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is considered a common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs. In a study 1 of Newfoundland dogs that were evaluated at a veterinary teaching institution in a 6-year period, 36 of 163 (22.1%) had CCLR. The economic

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

may not result in clinical signs and frequently is an incidental finding during physical examination. 3,7 Similarly, CCLR is a common disease affecting the stifle joint in dogs. 3,7–9 Cruciate ligament disease has been recognized in both large- and

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture is the most common cause of hind limb lameness in dogs, 1 and billions of dollars are spent each year by pet owners to manage the problem. 2 Veterinarians have typically believed that CCLR in dogs is best

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

represent extracapsular procedures. Although a consensus appears to exist among veterinary surgeons that surgical treatment of CCLR is beneficial for large dogs, the choice of a particular method in human and veterinary surgery is often based on surgeon

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

limb lameness in dogs and frequently affects middle-aged and older large-breed dogs. 27 Clinical signs associated with CCLR include pelvic limb lameness and effusion, instability, and signs of pain during hyperextension of the stifle joint. Numerous

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

osteoarthritis in dogs. Dogs with various orthopedic diseases, such as CCLR, elbow dysplasia, hip dysplasia, and idiopathic polyarthritis, are predisposed to the secondary development of osteoarthritis, a painful condition that is difficult to diagnose during its

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the prevalence of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs with lameness previously attributed to canine hip dysplasia (CHD).

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—369 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Hospital medical records from 1994 to 2003 were reviewed for dogs in which the referring veterinarian had diagnosed hip dysplasia or hip pain. Dogs were designated as having hind limb lameness because of partial or complete CCLR or CHD.

Results—8% of dogs were sexually intact females, 43% were spayed females, 14% were sexually intact males, and 35% were castrated males. Mean age was 3.8 years (range, 3 months to 15 years). The most common breeds were the Labrador Retriever (21%), German Shepherd Dog (13%), and Golden Retriever (11%). The prevalence of CCLR as the cause of hind limb lameness was 32% (95% confidence interval, 27.2% to 36.8%). The distribution of CCLR among hind limbs was left (29%), right (28%), and bilateral (43%). Of 119 dogs with CCLR, 94% had concurrent radiographic signs of CHD, 92% had stifle joint effusion, and 81% had a cranial drawer sign.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—On the basis of the high prevalence of CCLR in dogs referred for lameness because of CHD, it is important to exclude other sources of stifle joint disease before making recommendations for treatment of CHD. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;227:1109–1111)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

Noninvasive, computer-assisted, three-dimensional kinematic gait analysis was used to describe lameness in a chronic model of cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR) in dogs.

Design

Hind limb lameness was evaluated prior to and at 1, 3, and 6 months after transection of the cranial cruciate ligament.

Animals

Seven clinically normal large dogs.

Procedure

Dynamic flexion and extension angles and angular velocities were calculated for the coxofemoral, femorotibial, and tarsal joints. Distance and temporal variables were determined. Essential Fourier coefficients were used to develop mean flexion extension curves for all joints and to compare changes in movement that developed with CCLR over time.

Results

Each joint had a characteristic pattern of flexion and extension movement that changed with CCLR. The femorotibial joint angle was more flexed throughout stance and early swing phase of stride and failed to extend in late stance. Angular velocity of the femorotibial joint was damped throughout stance phase, with extension velocity almost negligible. The coxofemoral and tarsal joint angles, in contrast to the femorotibial joint angle, were extended more during stance phase. These changes were documented as differences noted in the essential Fourier coefficients. Stride length and frequency also varied significantly after CCLR.

Conclusions

Cranial cruciate ligament rupture affects movement of the coxofemoral and tarsal joints, as well as the femorotibial joint, in gait. A pattern of joint movement may be discerned in which the coxofemoral and tarsal joints compensate for the dysfunction of the femorotibial joint.

Clinical Relevance

Methods were developed that will improve objective evaluation of CCLR and its treatment in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:120-126)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

colon diameter to length of the cranial end plate of L2 were related to diagnosis category. See PAGE 880 Patellar luxation and concomitant cranial cruciate ligament rupture in dogs Both medial patellar luxation and CCLR are common conditions

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association