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on diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) and to summarize perspectives on the importance of DEI initiatives. The importance of DEI has been shown to be key to providing the highest quality of care, fostering unique

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that there were no conflicts of interest. ABBREVIATIONS ACVS American College of Veterinary Surgeons CI Confidence interval STEM Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics Footnotes a. Qualtrics XM, Qualtrics, Provo, Utah

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there were no conflicts of interest. ABBREVIATIONS ACVS American College of Veterinary Surgeons Footnotes a. R: A language and environment for statistical computing, version 3.3.3, R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna

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Objective

To obtain information from specialists in equine surgery as to prevalence of, predisposing factors for, and methods to prevent postoperative adhesion formation in horses undergoing abdominal surgery.

Design

Survey.

Procedure

Surveys were mailed to 196 diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons involved in equine practice.

Results

60 (31%) surveys were returned. Most respondents (55/60) routinely informed clients of the risk of postoperative adhesion formation in horses with small intestinal lesions. When asked after which procedures they routinely used measures to prevent adhesions, 56 of 60 (93%) indicated that they did after small intestinal resection and anastomosis and 56 of 60 (93%) indicated that they did after any abdominal surgery in foals. The 4 methods most frequently listed when respondents were asked which methods were effective at preventing adhesion formation were meticulous surgical technique, administration of antibiotics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, intraoperative peritoneal lavage, and methods that prevent abdominal contamination. Most respondents (50/60) thought that at least some horses with colic secondary to adhesion formation could be managed medically. Fifty-four (90%) respondents indicated that they were successful less than half of the time when treating horses with adhesions severe enough to require additional surgery.

Conclusion

In general, respondents thought that less than 15% of horses undergoing abdominal surgery would develop adhesions, but that horses with small intestinal disease and foals were most prone to develop adhesions. Meticulous surgical technique was thought to be the most important factor in preventing adhesions, and many prevention regimens reported to be effective in the literature were not commonly used in practice. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:1573–1576)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A questionnaire designed to elicit information concerning prevalence, underlying causes, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, and complications of endotoxemia in horses was mailed to diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine and the American College of Veterinary Surgeons who identified themselves as equine practitioners. Gastrointestinal tract compromise, conditions associated with foaling, and grain overload were reported to be the most common clinical conditions that led to endotoxemia. Laminitis was the most commonly reported complication. Most of the respondents diagnosed endotoxemia on the basis of the following clinical and laboratory findings: neutropenia, leukopenia, hyperemic mucous membranes, tachycardia, and fever. Treatments used to attempt to prevent development of endotoxemia or to treat horses with endotoxemia included iv fluids and administration of broad-spectrum antimicrobials and flunixin meglumine. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997; 210:87–92)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

American College of Veterinary Surgeons - Feb. 14-15, 2022 Published: 30 June 2022   The American College of Veterinary Surgeons recently welcomed new diplomates following the board certification examination it held Feb. 14

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American College of Veterinary Surgeons – Oct. 12-15, 2022 Published: 19 December 2022   Event Annual surgery summit, Oct. 12-15, Portland, Oregon Awards ACVS Founders’ Award for Career Achievement Dr. David E

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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the quality of information regarding osteoarthritis (OA) in dogs currently available on the World Wide Web.

Design—Survey study.

Procedure—5 search engines were searched with the keywords "dog," "degenerative joint disease," "canine," and "osteoarthritis," and the first 50 sites listed by each search engine were analyzed. Unique Web site addresses were distributed to 3 diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, who provided a standardized evaluation of each site.

Results—30 unique Web sites were evaluated. Twenty (66%) provided information consistent with conventional knowledge as outlined in textbooks and peer-reviewed literature, 8 (27%) provided experimental or anecdotal information in addition to conventional knowledge, and 2 (7%) provided misleading information. Mean scores for overall usefulness of the information provided in regard to clinical features of and treatment for OA were 1.3 and 1.5, respectively (1 = information of minimal use; 5 = very useful information). Twenty-three (77%) sites encouraged pet owners to seek the advice of a veterinarian. Twenty-three (77%) sites were given overall quality scores < 2, and 7 (23%) were given scores between 2 and 3 (1 = site was counterproductive; 5 = site was very valuable).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that the quality of information currently available on the Web that addresses OA in dogs is questionable. Although most of the sites conveyed some conventional information with reasonable accuracy, the information was incomplete, of minimal use, and often considered counterproductive. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:1272–1275)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the economic impact to veterinary clients for the medical and surgical treatment of rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament (RCCL) in dogs for the year 2003.

Design—Economic impact survey.

Sample Population—501 diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons (ACVS) indicating that their area of surgical emphasis was small animal orthopedic surgery or small animal general and orthopedic surgery and 4,000 veterinarians indicating to the AVMA that their professional area was small animal practice exclusive or mixed animal practice (at least 80% small animal).

Procedure—Veterinarians were surveyed concerning the cost for medical and surgical treatment of RCCL for 2003. The economic impact was calculated by multiplying the number of RCCL surgeries performed by the mean cost of surgery. This was added to the number of RCCL cases managed medically multiplied by the mean cost of medical management. This estimate for survey responders was extrapolated to the total number of veterinarians in the study population for the ACVS or AVMA.

Results—Estimates for the total cost of surgery were $171,730,134.72 and $1,020,167,907 for veterinarians in the ACVS and AVMA populations, respectively. The cost of medical management was $2,885,687.86 and $126,558,155.16 for veterinarians in the ACVS and AVMA populations, respectively. After combining the ACVS and AVMA populations, we estimated that owners spent $1.32 billion for the treatment of RCCL in the United States in 2003.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—RCCL is a prevalent, costly injury. Results may motivate veterinary and consumer agencies to prioritize funding for a better understanding of the injury. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005; 227:1604–1607)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine current practices regarding use of antimicrobials in equine patients undergoing surgery because of colic at veterinary teaching hospitals.

Design—Survey.

Sample Population—Diplomates of the American College of Veterinary Surgeons performing equine surgery at veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States.

Procedure—A Web-based questionnaire was developed, and 85 surgeons were asked to participate. The first part of the survey requested demographic information and information about total number of colic surgeries performed at the hospital, number of colic surgeries performed by the respondent, and whether the hospital had written guidelines for antimicrobial drug use. The second part pertained to nosocomial infections. The third part provided several case scenarios and asked respondents whether they would use antimicrobial drugs in these instances.

Results—Thirty-four (40%) surgeons responded to the questionnaire. Respondents indicated that most equine patients undergoing surgery because of colic at veterinary teaching hospitals in the United States received antimicrobial drugs. Drugs that were used were similar for the various hospitals that were represented, and for the most part, the drugs that were used were fairly uniform irrespective of the type of colic, whereas the duration of treatment varied with the type of colic and the surgical findings. The combination of potassium penicillin and gentamicin was the most commonly used treatment.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results of this study document the implementation of recommendations by several authors in veterinary texts that antimicrobial drugs be administered perioperatively in equine patients with colic that are undergoing surgery. However, the need for long-term antimicrobial drug treatment in equine patients with colic is unknown. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2002;220:1359–1365)

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