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History A 12-year-old 190-kg intact male African lion ( Panthera leo ) housed at the Cali Zoo in Cali, Colombia, presented for anorexia, pale mucous membranes, steatorrhea and a mild right hind limb lameness. A CBC and serum biochemical

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

for use in exotic species, which commonly leads to empirical extralabel use. a African lions ( Panthera leo ) are the most well-represented felids identified by the Taxon Advisory Group in North American zoos accredited by the Association of Zoos and

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether FIV infection in captive African lions is associated with changes in immune cell variables similar to those detected in domestic cats infected with FIV.

Animals—5 captive African lions naturally infected with FIV (FIV+) and 5 lions not infected with FIV (FIV).

Procedure—Peripheral blood samples were collected from FIV+ lions during annual examinations conducted during a 7-year period and at a single time point from the FIV lions. From results of CBC and flow cytometry, lymphocyte subsets were characterized and compared.

Results—Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentage and absolute number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were significantly lower in FIV+ lions, compared with these values in FIV– lions. In FIV+ lions, severe depletion in the absolute number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells was detected, although this did not correlate with clinical signs. Muscle wasting was the most consistent clinical sign of infection.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that FIV+ African lions develop lymphocyte deficiencies, including significant decreases in the absolute number of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; these findings of immune dysfunction are similar to those defined for FIV+ domestic cats. It is important to monitor the number of CD4+ T cells in infected animals as a measure of disease progression. (Am J Vet Res 2003; 64:1293–1300)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

the muscular tunics of the blood vessels of the stomach and gastric vessels. An 11-year-old sexually intact male African lion ( Panthera leo ) at a wildlife park died following acute hematemesis. This lion had been hand raised and had arrived at a

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

A 15-month-old 66-kg (145-lb) African lion ( Panthera leo; lion 1) was examined before undergoing elective ovariectomy to prevent breeding. The lion was privately owned, had been bred for public exhibition, and was housed in an outdoor pen

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

malformation in two African lions ( Panthera leo ) . J Zoo Wildl Med 2002 ; 33 : 249 – 255 . 10.1638/1042-7260(2002)033[0249:SCDTAV]2.0.CO;2 5. Watson AG Hall MA De Lahunta A. Congenital occipitoatlantoaxial malformation in a cat . Compend

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Laparoscopic ovariectomy with a single-port multiple-access device in seven African lionesses Seven privately owned female African lions ( Panthera leo ) that were housed in outdoor pens underwent elective ovariectomy by means of a single

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

History A captive 13-year-old castrated male African lion ( Panthera leo ) housed at a large cat sanctuary for the previous 5 years was found dead within its enclosure, and the carcass was submitted to the University of Tennessee Veterinary

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

; 39 : 608 – 613 . 10.1638/2008-068.1 6. Douglass EM . Lymphosarcoma and blockage of the biliary duct in an African lion ( Panthera leo ) . Vet Med Small Anim Clin 1979 ; 74 : 1637 – 1641 . 7. Sakai H Yanai T Yonemaru K , et al

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

most common in domestic cats, 2,4,7 it has been described in dogs 8 and an African lion. 9 In cats, the condition usually affects adults, but there is no sex predilection. 1,2,4 Cerebral cuterebriasis most commonly develops in cats that have access

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association