Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 368 items for :

  • "veterinary microbiology" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

critical need for training veterinary microbiology specialists and microbiologists working in the laboratory. Due to retirements, changing laboratory test needs, and the small number of training programs, VDLs are experiencing a shortage of trained

Open access

: 10.3390/antibiotics10040409 8. Timofte D , Broens EM , Guardabassi L , European Network for Optimization of Veterinary Antimicrobial Treatment (ENOVAT); ESCMID Study Group for Veterinary Microbiology (ESGVM); European College of

Open access
Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against 40- and 56- to 64-kd antigens of Chlamydia pecorum strain Maeda, which was isolated from a cow with pneumonia. Using the monoclonal antibodies, 5 strains of C pecorum, 25 strains of mammalian and 19 strains of avian C psittaci, 1 strain of C pneumoniae, and 3 strains of C trachomatis were analyzed for immunologic reactivity by use of the indirect immunofluorescent test. Monoclonal antibody analysis revealed immunologic relatedness between C pecorum and mammalian strains of C psittaci, which were completely differentiated from the other avian strains. Bovine strains were distinguished from ovine strains. Antigenic diversity was observed for bovine and ovine strains. Feline- and guinea pig-derived strains were shown to be immunologically different from bovine and ovine strains. Results provide the basis for typing and epidemiologic study of bovine and ovine strains of C pecorum and C psittaci.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The prophylactic/therapeutic activity of natural bovine fibroblast interferon (BoF-ifn) against bovine rhinovirus infection in calves was assessed. Six calves were each given 8 intranasal inoculations of partially purified BoF-ifn (3.25 × 105 U at 8 am, 11 am, 5 pm, and 8 pm on day 1 and 8 am, 11 am, 2 pm, and 5pm on day 2), and 6 calves were given placebo. All calves were challenge exposed with 105.1 TCID 50) of bovine rhinovirus after the first 2 treatments (6 hours after the first ifn or placebo treatment). Nasal excretion of rhinovirus, ifn concentration in the nasal secretions, and nasal secretion and serum rhinovirus antibodies were measured before and at selected times after calves were inoculated. Interferon-treated calves excreted rhinovirus in their nasal secretions in lesser amounts (mean value, 0.84 log10 TCID 50/ml vs 1.58 log10 TCID 50/ml on postchallenge exposure days 1 and 2; (P < 0.05) and for a shorter duration (P < 0.05) than did placebo-treated calves. No calves developed clinical signs of respiratory tract illness. Rhinovirus antibody titer was not significantly different between ifn- and placebo-treated calves.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Efficacy of ivermectin at a dosage of 0.2 mg/kg of body weight was evaluated against naturally acquired ear mite (Otodectes cynotis) infestation in commercially raised ranch foxes (Vulpes fulva). Efficacy of ivermectin given sc twice at 3-week intervals was 97.4%. Toxicosis associated with drug treatment was not observed. Increased dosage of 1.0 mg/kg was given sc to 5 foxes each week for 6 consecutive weeks, and signs of toxicosis or illness were not observed after treatment.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate disease in kittens inoculated with Bartonella henselae strain LSU16.

Animals—Eighteen 12-week-old specific-pathogenfree kittens.

Procedure—Kittens were inoculated with B henselae strain LSU16 or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Blood samples were collected from kittens on alternate weeks, and bacteremia, clinical signs, and antibody concentrations were monitored for 6 months after inoculation.

Results—Kittens developed raised, erythematous areas at the site of inoculation within 72 hours. Swelling peaked at 14 days and resolved by 28 days after inoculation. Fever had a biphasic pattern, with an episode of 1- to 3-days' duration beginning 6 to 7 days after inoculation followed by an episode of 3- to 8- days' duration beginning 11 to 13 days after inoculation. Kittens were bacteremic by day 14 with peak bacteremia at days 14 to 28. Strong antibody responses to B henselae were detected. Clinical disease resolved before bacteremia became undetectable, but signs of disease correlated with the highest degree of bacteremia. Regional lymphadenopathy also was evident.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Clinical disease in kittens was similar to that in adult cats infected with B henselae strain LSU16, except that lethargy and anorexia were less severe in kittens, and a biphasic pattern of fever was detected in kittens. Clinical disease after inoculation with B henselae may be strain-dependent. To limit transmission of Bartonella organisms, appropriate flea prevention should be instituted.

Impact for Human Medicine—Kittens that are febrile, anorectic, lethargic, and that have lymphadenopathy should be tested for Bartonella organisms, and contact with immunocompromised owners should be discouraged. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:375–379)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

An antigen extract of Dictyocaulus viviparus was analyzed by use of sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the antigen-recognition patterns of serum antibody from cattle not infected, cattle infected with D viviparus, and cattle with unknown history of D viviparus were analyzed by the use of ELISA and western blotting techniques. Cross-reactive antibody-recognition patterns were determined by comparing western blots of D viviparus-positive sera with blots of D viviparus-negative sera obtained from cattle singly infected with Bunostomum phlebotomum, Cooperia oncophora, C punctata, Nematodirus helvetianus, Oesophagostomum radiatum, or Ostertagia ostertagi. Five antigen bands unique to D viviparus were identified, and their frequency of appearance in western blots of sera from verified D viviparus-positive and -negative cattle, and sera from cattle exposed to the parasite, but with unknown D viviparus immune status, were determined. Of the 5 antigens unique to D viviparus, 29- and 19-kd bands had the highest frequencies of reaction (45.9 and 59.0%, respectively) with the test sera. These bands had strong reactivity with sera containing antibodies to D viviparus and did not react with the heterologous sera. We conclude that the 29- and 19-kd antigens may be useful for developing an improved serodiagnostic test for D viviparus infections in cattle.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The nucleotide sequence of a chromosomally encoded antigen-expressing gene of Borrelia coriaceae was determined and used as a target for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Two primer sets were designed specifying the amplification of 269- and 701-bp dna fragments. Primer set I, producing the short amplicon, was tenfold more sensitive than primer set II. As little as 10 fg of purified B coriaceae dna could consistently be detected. The pcr assays, containing controlled numbers of whole spirochetes, allowed detectable amplification of 2 to 10 organisms. An internal, nonradioactively labeled gene-specific probe verified specificity of the pcr amplicons. Neither primer set cross-reacted with other related spirochetes. This pcr assay was adapted and found suitable for identification of B coriaceae in biological samples, such as blood and thymus. Evidence for presence of B coriaceae in biological samples was not found in tissue samples obtained from experimentally infected cows and their fetuses. These data failed to establish a definite association between B coriaceae and epizootic bovine abortion.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research