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lethargic and inappetent after exiting brumation. Blood work performed by the referring veterinarian revealed severe leukocytosis (32.3 X 10 3 WBCs/μL; reference range, 1 1.45 X 10 3 to 19.0 X 10 3 WBCs/µL) and severe hyperglycemia (1,339 mg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

. Significant abnormalities noted on plasma biochemistry panel (Catalyst One; IDEXX Laboratories) included hyperglycemia (107 mg/dL; reference interval, 45 to 70 mg/dL) and hypoalbuminemia. Peritoneal fluid analysis revealed a total nucleated cell count of 200

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

, signs of pain on palpation of the abdomen, and labored breathing. A CBC and serum biochemical analysis revealed marked leukocytosis with neutrophilia and an appropriate left shift, mild to moderate anemia, mild hyperglycemia, moderate hypokalemia

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/dL [reference interval, 5 to 30 mg/dL]), hyperglycemia (140 mg/dL; reference interval, 58 to 116 mg/dL), and low serum iron concentration (34 μg/dL; reference interval, 48 to 175 μg/dL). Hematologic abnormalities included nonregenerative anemia (Hct, 25

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

concentration and moderate hyperglycemia. Serum antibodies against systemic fungi ( Coccidioides spp, Blastomyces spp, and Histoplasma spp) were not detected by agar gel immunodiffusion immunoglobulin tests. Fine-needle aspiration of an enlarged popliteal

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

leukopenia with neutropenia. 5 Horses with functional pheochromocytomas usually have nonspecific biochemical findings, such as azotemia, metabolic acidosis, hyperkalemia, and hyperglycemia. 4 These clinical signs and clinicopathologic findings can easily be

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/dL [reference interval, 7 to 25 mg/dL]; creatinine concentration, 4.5 mg/dL [reference interval, 1 to 1.7 mg/dL]), hyperglycemia (176 mg/dL; reference interval, 73 to 113 mg/dL), hyperkalemia (6.9 mmol/L; reference interval, 2.9 to 4.8 mmol/L), hypocalcemia (9

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

hyperglycemia (200 mg/dL; reference interval [RI], 50 to 75 mg/dL); mild hypocalcemia (8.3 mg/dL; RI, 8.9 to 11.7 mg/dL); hypomagnesemia (1.9 mg/dL; RI, 2.8 to 3.6 mg/dL); hypoalbuminemia (1.5 g/dL; RI, 2.7 to 3.9 g/dL); mild hyperbilirubinemia (0.2 mg

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The patient’s mild mature neutrophilia and moderate to marked lymphopenia were most compatible with a corticosteroid-mediated stress response, and mild hyperglycemia provided additional support. 1 A definitive cause of muscle injury or necrosis was

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

/μL). Serum biochemical analysis revealed mild hyperglycemia (127 mg/dL; reference interval, 73 to 113 mg/dL) and mild hyperglobulinemia (3.3 g/dL; reference interval, 1.3 to 3.2 g/dL), with no additional remarkable findings. A urine sample was collected by

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association