Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 39 items for :

  • "foreign body obstruction" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

of mechanical obstruction (T1) study group (B), and after surgical correction of mechanical obstruction (T2) study group (C). The surgeon points to the oral side of the foreign body obstruction (FBO) in each panel using a finger. An ellipse measuring

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

for acute abdomen syndrome include gastroenteritis, acute pancreatitis, hepatobiliary disease, urinary obstruction, and gastrointestinal foreign body obstruction (GIFBO). Thorough patient evaluation with a combination of general blood work (eg, CBC and

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

esophageal foreign body obstructions in dogs: 14 cases (2000–2004) . J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2006 ; 42 : 450 – 456 . 10.5326/0420450 2. Rousseau A Prittie J Broussard JD , et al. Incidence and characterization of esophagitis following esophageal

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

1992 ; 28 : 570 – 574 . 8. Sale CS Williams JM . Results of transthoracic esophagotomy retrieval of esophageal foreign body obstructions in dogs: 14 cases (2000–2004) . J Am Anim Hosp Assoc 2006 ; 42 : 450 – 456 . 10.5326/0420450 9. The

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The signalment, clinical and laboratory findings of surgical conditions, treatment, and outcome of 102 cases of descending colon disease in horses were reviewed. Abnormal conditions were categorized as enteroliths, impactions, strangulating lipomas, fecaliths, foreign body obstruction, volvulus, nephrosplenic entrapment, and other conditions. Eleven breed categories of horses were seen during this period. Arabians, ponies, and American miniature horses were more predisposed to descending colon disease than other breeds (P < 0.05). Female horses and animals >15 years old were more likely to be affected with descending colon disease, whereas horses <5 years old were less likely to be affected (P < 0.05). More specifically, Arabians, Quarter Horses, and Thoroughbreds >10 years old were breeds that were overrepresented when compared with the hospital population (P < 0.05). Enteroliths were most commonly seen in horses between 5 and 10 years old (P < 0.05) and were not seen in horses <2 years old. Enteroliths had a tendency to develop more commonly in Arabians and in female horses. Impactions affected horses >15 years old (P < 0.05) and had a greater tendency to affect ponies and American miniature horses. Female horses were more commonly affected by impaction than were males. Strangulating lipomas were commonly seen in horses >15 years old (P < 0.05) and more specifically female Quarter Horses (P < 0.05). Fecaliths tended to be a disease of horses <1 year old or >15years old and affected males more commonly than females. Ponies, American miniature horses, mixed-breed horses, and mustangs were the breeds most commonly affected. Surgical conditions were categorized as vascular (16%) or nonvascular (84%) conditions. Vascular conditions included strangulating lipomas (6%) and other conditions (10%). Nonvascular conditions included enteroliths (40%), impactions (25%), fecaliths (13%), and other conditions (6%). Horses with vascular lesions were older than horses with nonvascular conditions (P < 0.05). Peritoneal fluid values were high for all surgical conditions of the descending colon. Nucleated cell count and total protein concentration in peritoneal fluid retrieved from horses with vascular lesions were higher than in horses with nonvascular lesions (P < 0.01). Palpation per rectum revealed abnormal findings more commonly in horses with vascular compromise (P < 0.05). Of those horses taken to surgery, 91% were recovered from anesthesia and discharged; 90% of horses, for which the condition was monitored to at least 6 months after surgery, were alive. All horses that were medically treated were alive at least 6 months after discharge.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

-headed arrows). Treatment and Outcome Top differential diagnoses for the generalized ileus were small intestinal mechanical foreign body obstruction, viral enteritis, or mesenteric volvulus. Dysautonomia was considered less likely because of the

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

dental chew treats I read with interest and dismay the article titled, “Esophageal foreign body obstruction caused by a dental chew treat in 31 dogs (2000–2006)” 1 by Drs. Leib and Sartor. For background and disclosure, I became interested in Greenies

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

following groups: foreign body obstruction, gastrointestinal mass, intussusception, perforation or ulceration, a problem at a previous surgical site (namely dehiscence or stricture), a mix of the categories described above, or for a reason other than those

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

proximal to a foreign body obstruction as well as intramural masses or extramural compression causing mechanical intestinal obstruction. 1 Furthermore, focal wall thickening as a result of severe inflammation may reduce the intestinal lumen and create a

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

is located in the normally positioned stomach ( Figure 2 ). Differential diagnoses based on radiographic findings include colonic volvulus, foreign body obstruction, volvulus of the small intestine, and adynamic ileus. Figure 2— Same

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association