Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 63 items for :

  • "cobalamin" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

functioning pancreatic acinar tissue. While EPI itself can be treated by PERT, managing associated cobalamin deficiencies and individualized nutritional approaches are usually required to achieve optimal clinical responses. Research suggests EPI is complicated

Open access

Introduction In mammalian species, cobalamin, a water-soluble vitamin (B12), is an essential cofactor for 2 enzyme systems, and adequate quantities are necessary for nucleic acid synthesis, hematopoiesis, and other vital functions. 1 , 2

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Cobalamin is a water-soluble vitamin of the B group and an essential cofactor for nucleic acid synthesis and hematopoiesis. Because absorption of this vitamin is complex and requires intact pancreatic and ileal function, serum cobalamin

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

The prevalence of hypocobalaminemia in dogs with chronic gastrointestinal disease ranges from 6% to 19%. 1,2 Cobalamin deficiency may develop during chronic and severe small intestinal disease as a result of damage of mucosal receptors for the

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Cobalamin (vitamin B12) is an essential cofactor for several enzyme systems in mammals, and adequate concentrations of this cofactor are required for nucleic acid synthesis. 1 Animals are unable to synthesize cobalamin and therefore depend

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Introduction Measurements of serum concentrations of cobalamin (vitamin B12), folate (vitamin B9), cPLI, and cTLI are widely used as minimally invasive tools to diagnose and monitor small intestinal and exocrine pancreatic disease in dogs. 1

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To validate an automated chemiluminescent immunoassay for measuring serum cobalamin concentration in cats, to establish and validate gas chromatography-mass spectrometry techniques for use in quantification of methylmalonic acid, homocysteine, cysteine, cystathionine, and methionine in sera from cats, and to investigate serum concentrations of methylmalonic acid, methionine, homocysteine, cystathionine, and cysteine as indicators of biochemical abnormalities accompanying severe cobalamin (vitamin B12) deficiency in cats.

Sample Population—Serum samples of 40 cats with severe cobalamin deficiency (serum cobalamin concentration < 100 ng/L) and 24 control cats with serum cobalamin concentration within the reference range.

Procedure—Serum concentrations of cobalamin were measured, using a commercial automated chemiluminescent immunoassay. Serum concentrations of methylmalonic acid, methionine, homocysteine, cystathionine, and cysteine were measured, using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, selected ion monitoring, stable-isotope dilution assays.

Results—Cats with cobalamin deficiency had significant increases in mean serum concentrations of methylmalonic acid (9,607 nmol/L), compared with healthy cats (448 nmol/L). Affected cats also had substantial disturbances in amino acid metabolism, compared with healthy cats, with significantly increased serum concentrations of methionine (133.8 vs 101.1 µmol/L) and significantly decreased serum concentrations of cystathionine (449.6 vs 573.2 nmol/L) and cysteine (142.3 vs 163.9 µmol/L). There was not a significant difference in serum concentrations of homocysteine between the 2 groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Cats with gastrointestinal tract disease may have abnormalities in amino acid metabolism consistent with cobalamin deficiency. Parenteral administration of cobalamin may be necessary to correct these biochemical abnormalities. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1852–1858)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Cobalamin (vitamin B 12 ) is an essential cofactor for 3 mammalian enzyme systems, and adequate amounts are required for nucleic acid synthesis and hematopoiesis. Dogs are unable to synthesize cobalamin and are entirely dependent upon adequate

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

and cobalamin status of cats consuming vegetarian diets. Materials and Methods Study participants were recruited through a Web site created specifically for recruitment purposes. 3 The Web site shared reciprocal links with other sites, including

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association