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this search at each institution included any of the following: aneurysm, cardiac, vascular, cardiomegaly, arrhythmia, murmur, exophthalmia, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cardiomyopathy, effusion, pleural, pericardial, coelomic effusion, heart

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Atherosclerosis is a disease of elastic and muscular arteries characterized by vascular inflammation and buildup of cholesterol, fibrin, calcium, and cellular waste products within the intima of the vessel wall. The buildup results in plaque

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory fibroproliferative vascular disease characterized by the buildup of atheromatous materials composed of numerous compounds including inflammatory cells, lipid, calcium, and collagen in the luminal aspect of

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

suggestive of an acute renal thromboembolism related with clinical and macroscopic findings. The microscopic lesions observed in the abdominal aorta were morphologically consistent with chronic atherosclerosis, and this was considered the most probable cause

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

heart failure secondary to pulmonary atherosclerosis. Although pulmonary arterial pressures have not been established for clinically normal birds, an estimated pulmonary systolic pressure of at least 90 mm Hg identified in this parrot would be considered

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

of the terminal portion of the aorta and the left external iliac, left and right common carotid, and right brachial arteries ( Figure 2 ), suggestive of atherosclerosis. Echocardiography was performed, and results were unremarkable. Because

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

C aptive psittacine birds are predisposed to lipid disorders, which include atherosclerosis, hepatic lipidosis, xanthomas, and obesity, with atherosclerosis being one of their most common lipid disorders. Similar to humans, increased plasma

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Atherosclerosis is characterized by hardening of the arteries and plaque formation and is widely reported in humans, other mammals, and birds. A high intake of cholesterol or an imbalance in dietary fatty acids can accelerate the development of

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To examine whether obese cats, compared with lean cats, have alterations in lipoprotein metabolism that might lead to a decrease in glucose metabolism and insulin secretion.

Animals—10 lean and 10 obese adults cats (5 neutered males and 5 neutered females each).

Procedure—Intravenous glucose tolerance tests with measurements of serum glucose, insulin, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations were performed. Lipoprotein fractions were examined in serum by isopycnic density gradient ultracentrifugation.

Results—Obese cats had insulin resistance. Plasma triglyceride and cholesterol concentrations were significantly increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats. Very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) concentrations were increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats; however, the composition of various fractions remained unchanged between obese and lean cats, indicating greater synthesis and catabolism of VLDL in obese cats. Serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations were increased in obese cats, compared with lean cats. Serum NEFA concentrations were only significantly different between obese and lean cats when separated by sex; obese male cats had higher baseline serum NEFA concentrations and greater NEFA suppression in response to insulin, compared with lean male cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Lipid metabolism changes in obese cats, compared with lean cats. The increase in VLDL turnover in obese cats might contribute to insulin resistance of glucose metabolism, whereas the increase in serum HDL cholesterol concentration might reflect a protective effect against atherosclerosis in obese cats. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:299–303)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research