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  • Author or Editor: Yuko Goto x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine effects of a common mutation (2-base insertion in exon 5) of the TP53 gene on biological function of p53 protein in canine histiocytic sarcoma cells.

SAMPLE

Canine histiocytic tumor cell lines DH82 with deletion of TP53 and CHS-3 with the wild-type TP53 and canine wild-type and mutant TP53 fragments.

PROCEDURES

Wild-type or mutant TP53 with a polyprotein peptide tag at the N-terminus was transduced into DH82 and CHS-3 cells. Expression of p53 protein, changes in function as a transcription factor, and susceptibility to doxorubicin and nimustine were compared.

RESULTS

Transduced p53 protein was detected in wild-type TP53–transduced DH82 and CHS-3 cells, whereas expression was not detected in mutant TP53–transduced cells. There were significant increases in expression of target genes of p53 protein, including p21 and MDM2, in wild-type TP53–transduced cells, compared with results for native and mock-transfected cells, but not in mutant TP53–transduced cells. There was no significant difference in drug susceptibilities among native and derivative cells of CHS-3. However, cell viabilities of wild-type TP53–transduced DH82 cells incubated with doxorubicin were significantly lower than viabilities of native, mock-transfected, and AT insertion mutation–TP53–transduced DH82 cells; susceptibility to nimustine did not differ significantly among cells.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Expression of p53 protein and its function as a transcription factor were lost after addition of a 2-base insertion in the TP53 gene in canine histiocytic tumor cells. Additional studies are needed to investigate the clinical relevance of this mutation in histiocytic sarcomas of dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare composition and colony formation of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMCs) harvested from dogs by means of a new perfusion method and the conventional aspiration method.

Animals—7 healthy adult Beagles.

Procedures—BMMCs were collected from the humeri and femurs of Beagles via perfusion and aspiration methods. Flow cytometric analysis was performed to quantify the presence of contaminant cells from the peripheral blood and the percentage of CD34+ progenitor cells in the BMMCs. A CFU assay was conducted to determine the number of progenitor cells in the BMMCs.

Results—The perfusion method was safely performed in all 7 dogs. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that the percentages of contaminant CD3+CD4+, CD3+CD8+, and CD21 + lymphocytes in BMMCs obtained via perfusion were significantly lower than percentages obtained via aspiration. The percentage of CD34+ cells obtained via perfusion was significantly higher than that obtained via aspiration. In addition, perfusion yielded a significantly higher CFU count than did aspiration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The perfusion method used in this study can minimize the contamination of bone marrow samples with peripheral blood and was a more efficient means for collecting canine bone marrow progenitor cells than the conventional aspiration method. Therefore, the perfusion method can be more suitable than aspiration for harvesting bone marrow cells for transplantation in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine the DNA methylation status of the ABCB1 gene in tumor cells of dogs with lymphoma.

Animals—27 dogs with multicentric B-cell high-grade lymphoma (19 chemotherapy-sensitive dogs and 8 chemotherapy-resistant dogs).

Procedures—The DNA methylation profile of the CpG island of the ABCB1 gene was analyzed by use of bisulphite sequencing and real-time methylation-specific PCR assay in lymphoma cells. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR assay of the ABCB1 gene was conducted to measure the amount of mRNA. Correlation between the amount of ABCB1 mRNA and the methylation rate was examined.

Results—The CpG island of the ABCB1 gene was hypomethylated in most dogs in both the chemotherapy-sensitive and -resistant groups. No significant difference was detected in the methylation rate between the 2 groups, and no significant correlation was detected between the methylation rate and the mRNA expression level.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Expression of the ABCB1 gene was not suppressed by hypermethylation of its CpG island in most dogs with lymphoma regardless of their chemotherapy sensitivity status.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate effects of prednisolone administration on gallbladder emptying rate and gallbladder bile composition in dogs.

ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles.

PROCEDURES Prednisolone was administered (2 mg/kg, SC, once daily for 2 weeks) to each dog and tapered over 2 weeks. Gallbladder emptying rate and bile composition were evaluated before and after administration of prednisolone for 2 weeks as well as 1 week after cessation of prednisolone administration.

RESULTS Gallbladder emptying rate decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (median, 27%; range, 0% to 38%), compared with rate before administration (median, 59%; range, 29% to 68%), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 45%; range, 23% to 48%). Gallbladder bile mucin concentration decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (median, 8.8 mg/dL; range, 6.2 to 11.3 mg/dL), compared with concentration before administration (median, 13.1 mg/dL; range, 10.7 to 21.7 mg/dL), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 14.3 mg/dL; range, 9.6 to 26.7 mg/dL). Gallbladder taurochenodeoxycholic acid concentration decreased significantly after prednisolone administration (8.1 mmol/L; range, 6.8 to 15.2 mmol/L), compared with concentration before administration (median, 27.2 mmol/L; range, 22.0 to 31.9 mmol/L), but then increased 1 week after cessation of administration (median, 26.4 mmol/L; range, 15.1 to 31.5 mmol/L).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE A lower gallbladder emptying rate caused by prednisolone administration may be involved in the pathogenesis of gallbladder disease in dogs. Further studies are required to determine the clinical importance of lower gallbladder bile mucin concentrations caused by glucocorticoid administration in the pathogenesis of gallbladder disease in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To assess plasma viral RNA concentration in cats naturally infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

Animals—28 FIV-infected cats.

Procedure—Cats were categorized into 1 of the 3 following stages on the basis of clinical signs: asymptomatic (nonclinical) carrier (AC; n = 11), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related complex (ARC; 9), or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS; 8). Concentration of viral RNA in plasma (copies per ml) was determined by use of a quantitative competitive polymerase chain reaction (QC-PCR) assay. Total lymphocyte count, CD4+ cell and CD8+ cell counts, and the CD4+ cell count-to-CD8+ cell count ratio were determined by use of flow cytometry.

Results—Plasma viral RNA concentration was significantly higher in cats in the AIDS stage, compared with cats in AC and ARC stages. Most (5/7) cats in the AIDS stage had low total lymphocyte, CD4+ cell, and CD8+ cell counts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Concentration of plasma viral RNA is a good indicator of disease progression in FIV-infected cats, particularly as cats progress from the ARC to the AIDS stage. Determination of CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts can be used as supportive indicators of disease progression. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:1609–1613)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine the prognostic value of CD44 variant isoform expression in dogs with multicentric high-grade B-cell lymphoma (BCL).

ANIMALS 45 dogs with multicentric BCL and 10 healthy control Beagles.

PROCEDURES The medical record database of a veterinary teaching hospital was searched to identify dogs with BCL that were treated between November 2005 and April 2015. Information regarding overall response to chemotherapy, progression-free survival (PFS) time, and overall survival time was extracted from each record. Archived lymph node aspirate specimens from dogs with BCL and lymph node aspirate specimens from the 10 control dogs underwent real-time PCR analysis to determine mRNA expression of CD44 variant isoforms of exons 3, 6, and 7 and the CD44 whole isoform. For each isoform, mRNA expression was compared between dogs with BCL and control dogs. The mean relative expression of each isoform was used to classify dogs with BCL into either a high- or low-expression group, and overall response rate, PFS time, and overall survival time (ie, indices of prognosis) were compared between the 2 groups.

RESULTS For all isoforms evaluated, mean relative mRNA expression for dogs with BCL was numerically lower than that for control dogs. Dogs with BCL and high CD44 isoform expression had a lower overall response rate, median PFS time, and median overall survival time, compared with dogs with BCL and low CD44 isoform expression.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that, for dogs with BCL, high expression of exons 3, 6, and 7 was associated with a poor prognosis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research