Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for

  • Author or Editor: Won-gyun Son x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

5 dogs with a history of ventriculocordectomy were anesthetized with isoflurane for ovariohysterectomy, dental prophylaxis, or intracapsular lens extraction.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

No remarkable, abnormal clinical signs such as exercise intolerance, respiratory distress, or stridor were found in 4 dogs. However, 1 dog had cough after drinking, which had started after the ventriculocordectomy. During intubation, laryngeal web, suspected to be a complication of ventriculocordectomy, was accidentally discovered.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

Laryngeal web was observed during intubation, necessitating the use of a smaller-diameter endotracheal tube (ETT) for intubation. However, the smaller cuff volume of the smaller ETT did not prevent the air leak. Therefore, the ETT with the inflated cuff was pulled cranially until the narrowed laryngeal lumen was plugged with the cuff behind the vocal cords. The ETT was secured to prevent slippage. No air leakage around the ETT cuff or complications related to the ETT placement were observed in the peri-anesthetic period in any dog.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Laryngeal web can be found in patients with a history of larynx-related surgeries and may allow only a small-diameter ETT to pass through. The sealing technique used for peri-cuff air leak using a small ETT described here that can pass through a laryngeal web could be useful to seal an air leak around the cuff without complications.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery performed with general anesthesia in dogs.

Design—Retrospective case-control study.

Animals—14 dogs with development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery and 718 control dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs evaluated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital of Seoul National University from January 2009 to June 2011 were reviewed for assessment of risk factors for development of corneal ulcers.

Results—Among the 732 reviewed cases, 14 (1.9%) dogs of 6 breeds developed a corneal ulcer after nonocular surgery. Duration of anesthesia was significantly longer in dogs with ulcers than dogs without ulcers. The number of medications received and procedures performed were also significantly higher in dogs with ulcers than dogs without ulcers. Dogs with a small skull (OR, 8.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04 to 70.90) and dogs that received neurosurgery (OR, 21.12; 95% CI, 5.77 to 77.25) were more susceptible to development of corneal ulcers. Also, postoperative application of a fentanyl patch was a risk factor for development of corneal ulcers (OR, 4.53; 95% CI, 1.05 to 19.60).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Several risk factors were identified for development of corneal ulcers after nonocular surgery was performed with general anesthesia in dogs. Perioperative eye protection strategies and postoperative ophthalmic examination are needed to reduce the occurrence of corneal ulcers and their progression, especially for high-risk dogs and procedures.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate whether the administration of 2% dorzolamide ophthalmic solution in dogs undergoing ophthalmic surgery is associated with perianesthetic metabolic acidosis.

ANIMALS

60 dogs, with or without dorzolamide administration, underwent arterial blood gas analysis immediately after anesthesia for ophthalmic surgery between 2019 and 2022; a total of 60 surgeries were evaluated.

METHODS

This was a retrospective cross-sectional study. Logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the association between the administration of 2% dorzolamide ophthalmic solution in dogs and the development of metabolic acidosis. Additionally, the influence of various potential risk factors, including age, body weight, sex, use of topical or systemic NSAIDs, and preoperative medications on the occurrence of metabolic acidosis, was evaluated.

RESULTS

A significant association was found between the use of 2% dorzolamide ophthalmic solution and perianesthetic metabolic acidosis (OR, 6.79; 95% CI, 2.00 to 23.02; P = .002). Furthermore, topical dorzolamide administration was significantly associated with both perianesthetic hypokalemia (OR, 3.52; 95% CI, 1.11 to 11.20; P = .033) and perianesthetic hyperchloremia (OR, 9.25; 95% CI, 1.71 to 50.01; P = .010).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The use of 2% dorzolamide ophthalmic solution is associated with perianesthetic metabolic acidosis, hypokalemia, and hyperchloremia in dogs. It is prudent to be aware of these risks, especially before anesthesia.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the intraoperative and postoperative analgesic effects of intracameral lidocaine hydrochloride injection in dogs undergoing phacoemulsification.

Animals—12 healthy Beagles with healthy eyes.

Procedures—Dogs were randomly assigned to receive 1 of 2 intracameral injections: 2% lidocaine hydrochloride solution (0.3 mL) or an equivalent amount of balanced salt solution (BSS). All dogs were treated with acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg, IV) and cefazolin (30 mg/kg, IV), and tropicamide drops were topically applied to the eyes. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. The initial end-tidal isoflurane concentration was maintained at 1.2%. Heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressure, esophageal temperature, inspired and end-tidal isoflurane concentrations, and oxygen saturation were recorded every 5 minutes. The allocated agent was injected intracamerally after aspiration of the same volume of aqueous humor. Ten minutes after injection, phacoemulsification was performed. After surgery began, the isoflurane concentration was adjusted according to heart rate and mean arterial blood pressure. Pain scores were recorded before surgery and at 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5, 4, 6, 8, 16, and 24 hours after extubation.

Results—Isoflurane requirements were significantly higher in the BSS group than in the lidocaine group. Mean ± SD time to administration of supplementary analgesia was significantly shorter in the BSS group (1.4 ± 1.2 hours) than in the lidocaine group (4.9 ± 1.2 hours).

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Intracameral lidocaine injection had significant analgesic effects in dogs undergoing cataract surgery. Results of this study suggest the value of intracameral lidocaine injection as an analgesic for intraocular surgery in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research