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  • Author or Editor: Wm. J. Tranquilli x
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Summary

Fifteen Collies, previously having mild reactions to ivermectin challenge (120 μg/kg of body weight; 20 times the recommended dosage level), were studied to evaluate the effects of milbemycin oxime administration at 5 and 10 mg/kg (10 and 20 times the manufacturer's recommended dosage). Five replicates, comprising 3 dogs each, were formed on the basis of body weight. Within replicates, each dog was randomly allocated to treatment with 5 or 10 mg of milbemycin/kg or served as a untreated control. Dogs were examined repeatedly for signs of toxicosis for 4 days after treatment and daily thereafter. Two of 5 dogs treated at 5 mg/kg (10 × ) developed signs of mild depression on the day of treatment, but were normal 24 hours after treatment. All 5 dogs treated at 10 mg/kg (20 × ) developed signs of mild depression and ataxia by 6 hours. Signs persisted for 24 hours in 3 dogs. Two of these dogs also had mydriasis, whereas 3 salivated excessively. All dogs recovered completely by day 2 after treatment. The results of this study demonstrated that Collies sensitive to the effects of 120 μg of ivermectin (20 × )/kg show similar sensitivity to the effects of milbemycin oxine administered at 10 mg/kg (20 x). We conclude that ivermectin and milbemycin commercial formulations have similar margins of safety and that milbemycin toxicosis appears to be dose-dependent in Collies with a demonstrated sensitivity to ivermectin.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

The thiamylal sparing effect of midazolam was studied in 30 healthy Beagle and mixed-breed dogs. Using a replicated Latin square design, all dogs were given placebo (saline solution) and 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg of midazolam/ kg of body weight prior to iv administration of thiamylal sodium. The 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg dosages significantly decreased the amount of thiamylal required to obtund swallowing reflex and easily achieve endotracheal intubation. Midazolam at 0.1 and 0.2 mg/kg reduced thiamylal requirement by 16.4% and 18.9%, respectively, whereas the 0.05 mg/kg dosage decreased thiamylal requirement by only 6.8%. The 0.2 mg/kg dosage did not further decrease thiamylal requirement beyond that achieved with the 0.1 mg/kg dosage of midazolam. This study demonstrates that the preanesthetic iv administration of midazolam reduces the thiamylal dose necessary to accomplish intubation. The optimal preanesthetic dosage (lowest dosage with significant effect) was 0.1 mg/kg.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research