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  • Author or Editor: William W. Muir x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of the α2-adrenoceptor agonist medetomidine on respiratory rate (RR), tidal volume (VT), minute volume (VM), and central respiratory neuromuscular drive as determined by inspiratory occlusion pressure (IOP) during increasing fractional inspired concentrations of carbon dioxide (FiCO2) in conscious dogs.

Animals—6 healthy dogs (3 males and 3 females).

Procedure—Dogs were administered 0, 5, or 10 µg of medetomidine/kg IV. We measured RR, VT, VM, and IOP for the first 0.1 second of airway occlusion (IOP0.1) during FiCO2 values of 0%, 2.5%, 5.0%, and 7.5% at 15 minutes before and 5, 30, and 60 minutes after administration of medetomidine.

Results—Increases in FiCO2 significantly increased RR, VT, and VM. The IV administration of 5 and 10 µg of medetomidine/kg significantly decreased RR and VM at 5, 30, and 60 minutes for FiCO2 values of 2.5% and 5.0% and at 30 and 60 minutes for an FiCO2 value of 7.5%. The IOP0.1 was decreased after 30 minutes only for an FiCO2 value of 7.5% in dogs administered 5 and 10 µg of medetomidine/kg. The IOP0.1 was decreased at 60 minutes after administration of 10 µg of medetomidine/kg for an FiCO2 value of 7.5%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The IV administration of medetomidine decreases RR, VM, and central respiratory drive in conscious dogs. Medetomidine should be used cautiously and with careful monitoring in dogs with CNS depression or respiratory compromise. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65: 720–724)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effect of medetomidine on minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute volume (VM), and maximum inspiratory occlusion pressure (IOCPmax) in halothane- and isoflurane-anesthetized dogs.

Animals—6 healthy adult dogs (3 males and 3 females).

Procedure—The MAC of both inhalants was determined before and 5, 30, and 60 minutes after administration of medetomidine (5 μg/kg, IV). Dogs were subsequently anesthetized by administration of halothane or isoflurane and administered saline (0.9% NaCl) solution IV or medetomidine (5 μg/kg, IV). Respiratory variables and IOCPmax were measured at specific MAC values 15 minutes before and 5, 30, and 60 minutes after IV administration of medetomidine while dogs breathed 0% and 10% fractional inspired carbon dioxide (FICO2). Slopes of the lines for VM/FICO2 and IOCPmax/FICO2 were then calculated.

Results—Administration of medetomidine decreased MAC of both inhalants. Slope of VM/FICO2 increased in dogs anesthetized with halothane after administration of medetomidine, compared with corresponding values in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane. Administration of medetomidine with a simultaneous decrease in inhalant concentration significantly increased the slope for VM/FICO2, compared with values after administration of saline solution in dogs anesthetized with halothane but not isoflurane. Values for IOCPmax did not differ significantly between groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Equipotent doses of halothane and isoflurane have differing effects on respiration that are most likely attributable to differences in drug effects on central respiratory centers. Relatively low doses of medetomidine decrease the MAC of halothane and isoflurane in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of xylazine on canine coronary artery smooth muscle tone.

Sample Population—Hearts of 26 healthy dogs.

Procedure—Dogs were anesthetized with pentobarbital, and vascular rings of various diameters were prepared from the epicardial coronary arteries. Vascular rings were placed in tissue baths to which xylazine was added (cumulative concentrations ranging from 10–10 to 10–4M), and changes in vascular ring tension were continuously recorded. Effects of the nitric oxide inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 5mM), the α1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (10mM), and the α2-adrenoceptor antagonist atipamezole (10mM) on xylazine-induced changes in vascular ring tension were determined. Results were expressed as percentage of maximal contraction for each vascular ring preparation.

Results—Xylazine induced vasoconstriction of small (< 500-µm-diameter) and medium (500- to 1,000-µmdiameter) vascular rings but not of large (> 1,000-µmdiameter) rings. For large vascular rings, L-NAME, atipamezole, and prazosin did not significantly affect the contractile response to xylazine. For small vascular rings, the contractile response following addition of xylazine to rings treated with L-NAME was not significantly different from the contractile response following addition of xylazine to control rings, except at a xylazine concentration of 10–6M. Xylazine-induced vasoconstriction of small vascular rings was blocked by atipamezole, but the addition of prazosin had no effect on xylazine-induced vasoconstriction.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that xylazine increases smooth muscle tone of small canine coronary arteriesand that this effect is predominantly mediated by stimulation of α2adrenoceptors.( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:431–435)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effects of lactated Ringer's solution (LRS) with those of a physiologically balanced 6% hetastarch plasma expander administered to isoflurane-anesthetized dogs with hypotension induced by blood withdrawal.

Animals—12 healthy Beagles.

Procedure—Blood was withdrawn from isofluraneanesthetized dogs (volume withdrawn measured) to a systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP) of 80 mm Hg. Six dogs each received either LRS or hetastarch solution (90 mL/kg/h, IV). Hemodynamic variables, pH, blood gas concentrations, PCV, serum electrolyte and total protein concentrations, and colloid osmotic pressure (COP) were determined at baseline, while SAP was 80 mm Hg, and after fluid treatment. The volume of fluid administered and rate of return of SAP to within 10% of baseline values were recorded.

Results—Mean ± SD volume of blood withdrawn to decrease SAP to 80 mm Hg was 173 ± 38 mL. Hemodynamic variables decreased after blood withdrawal but returned to baseline values more rapidly after infusion of a smaller volume of hetastarch solution, compared with the response to LRS infusion. Whereas PCV and serum total protein concentration decreased after administration of either solution, COP decreased only after administration of LRS. The total volume of hetastarch solution and LRS required to restore and maintain SAP to within 10% of baseline values was 1.1 ± 0.9 and 4.4 ± 1.7 times greater than the volume of blood removed, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with LRS infusion, smaller volumes of hetastarch solution normalized and maintained SAP without lowering COP in isoflurane-anesthetized dogs after blood withdrawal. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:1189–1194)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective— To determine the hemodynamic effects of IM administration of romifidine hydrochloride in propofol-anesthetized cats.

Animals—15 adult domestic shorthair cats.

Procedure—Cats were randomly assigned to receive romifidine (0, 400, or 2,000 µg/kg, IM). Cats were anesthetized with propofol and mechanically ventilated with oxygen. The right jugular vein, left carotid artery, and right femoral artery and vein were surgically isolated and catheterized. Heart rate; duration of the PR, QRS, and QT intervals; mean pulmonary artery pressure; mean right atrial pressure; systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial pressures; left ventricular systolic pressure; left ventricular end-diastolic pressure; and cardiac output were monitored. Systemic vascular resistance, rate of change of left ventricular pressure, and rate pressure product were calculated. Arterial and venous blood samples were collected anaerobically for determination of pH and blood gas tensions (PO2 and PCO2).

Results—Administration of romifidine at 400 and 2,000 µg/kg, IM, decreased heart rate, cardiac output, rate of change of left ventricular pressure, rate pressure product, and pH. Arterial and pulmonary artery pressures, left ventricular pressure, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, and right atrial pressure increased and then gradually returned to baseline values. Arterial blood gas values did not change, whereas venous PCO2 increased and venous PO2 decreased. Significant differences between low and high dosages were rare, suggesting that the dosages investigated produced maximal hemodynamic effects.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Romifidine produces cardiovascular effects that are similar to those of other α2-agonists. High dosages of romifidine should be used with caution in cats with cardiovascular compromise. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1241–1246)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective–To determine prevalence of pain among dogs and cats examined as outpatients at a veterinary teaching hospital and characteristics of pain in dogs and cats with evidence of pain.

Design–Cross-sectional study.

Animals–1,153 dogs and 652 cats examined as outpatients at The Ohio State University during 2002.

Procedure–A questionnaire was administered to owners of all dogs and cats. For dogs and cats with evidence of pain, the cause, signs, anatomic location, type (superficial somatic, deep somatic, or visceral), duration, and severity of the pain and the principle mechanism (inflammatory, neuropathic, both, or unknown) responsible for the pain were determined on the basis of questionnaire responses and results of physical examination. The presence of primary hyperalgesia, secondary hyperalgesia, allodynia, and hyposensitivity was recorded.

Results–231 (20%) dogs and 92 (14%) cats had evidence of pain. Dogs with evidence of pain were significantly older and heavier than dogs without. Cats with evidence of pain were significantly older than cats without. In most dogs and cats with evidence of pain, the pain was determined to be of short duration (< 7 days), of mild or moderate severity, somatic, associated with primary hyperalgesia, and inflammatory. Analgesic drugs were frequently administered to dogs with chronic pain, but were not always considered effective.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance–Results suggest that mild or moderate pain associated with inflammation may be seen in dogs and cats examined as outpatients. Older, heavier dogs and older cats were more likely to have evidence of pain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2004;224:1459–1463)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To estimate the prevalence and characteristics of pain in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service at a veterinary teaching hospital and evaluate the response of dogs and cats with signs of pain to analgesic treatment.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—317 dogs and 112 cats.

Procedure—A questionnaire was used to categorize the characteristics of pain. The location, cause, and signs of pain were determined by obtaining a thorough history and conducting a physical examination. Pain was categorized by type (superficial somatic, deep somatic, or visceral), mechanism (inflammatory, neuropathic, or both), severity (mild, moderate, or severe), and duration. Evidence for primary or secondary hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to manipulation was determined. The response to single or multiple analgesic drug administration was assessed.

Results—179 (56%) dogs and 60 (54%) cats had signs of pain. In most of these dogs and cats, pain was classified as acute (< 24 hours' duration) and of moderate severity and was associated with primary hypersensitivity. Most dogs had deep somatic pain; most cats had visceral pain. Inflammation was the most common mechanism. One hundred nineteen (66%) dogs and 41 (68%) cats were treated with analgesic drugs. Analgesic treatment was considered effective in 73 (61%) dogs and 31 (76%) cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that moderate to severe acute somatic pain caused by inflammation is common in dogs and cats examined by an emergency service and that a combination of multiple analgesic drugs is more effective than any single analgesic drug in the treatment of pain in these dogs and cats. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:2004–2009)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the cardiorespiratory, gastrointestinal, analgesic, and behavioral effects between IV and IM administration of morphine in conscious horses with no signs of pain.

Animals—6 healthy adult horses.

Procedures—Horses received saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (IM or IV) or morphine sulfate (0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg, IM or IV) in a randomized, masked crossover study design. The following variables were measured before and for 360 minutes after drug administration: heart and respiratory rates; systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures; rectal temperature; arterial pH and blood gas variables; intestinal motility; and response to thermal and electrical noxious stimuli. Adverse effects and horse behavior were also recorded. Plasma concentrations of morphine, morphine-3-glucuronide, and morphine-6-glucuronide were measured via liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry.

Results—No significant differences in any variable were evident after saline solution administration. Intravenous and IM administration of morphine resulted in minimal and short-term cardiorespiratory, intestinal motility, and behavioral changes. A decrease in gastrointestinal motility was detected 1 to 2 hours after IM administration of morphine at doses of 0.05 and 0.1 mg/kg and after IV administration of morphine at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg. Morphine administration yielded no change in any horse's response to noxious stimuli. Both morphine-3-glucuronide and morphine-6-glucuronide were detected in plasma after IV and IM administration of morphine.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clinically relevant doses of morphine sulfate yielded minimal and short-term behavioral and intestinal motility effects in healthy horses with no signs of pain. Neither dose of morphine affected their response to a noxious stimulus.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of constant rate infusion of morphine, lidocaine, ketamine, and morphine- lidocaine-ketamine (MLK) combination on endtidal isoflurane concentration (ET-Iso) and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane and monitor depth of anesthesia by use of the bispectral index (BIS).

Animals—6 adult dogs.

Procedure—Each dog was anesthetized with isoflurane on 5 occasions, separated by a minimum of 7 to 10 days. Individual isoflurane MAC values were determined for each dog. Reduction in isoflurane MAC, induced by administration of morphine (3.3 µg/kg/min), lidocaine (50 µg/kg/min), ketamine (10 µg/kg/min), and MLK, was determined. Heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry (SpO2), core body temperature, and BIS were monitored.

Results—Mean ± SD isoflurane MAC was 1.38 ± 0.08%. Morphine, lidocaine, ketamine, and MLK significantly lowered isoflurane MAC by 48, 29, 25, and 45%, respectively. The percentage reductions in isoflurane MAC for morphine and MLK were not significantly different but were significantly greater than for lidocaine and ketamine. The SpO2, mean arterial pressure, and core body temperature were not different among groups. Heart rate was significantly decreased at isoflurane MAC during infusion of morphine and MLK. The BIS was inversely related to the ET-Iso and was significantly increased at isoflurane MAC during infusions of morphine and ketamine, compared with isoflurane alone.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Low infusion doses of morphine, lidocaine, ketamine, and MLK decreased isoflurane MAC in dogs and were not associated with adverse hemodynamic effects. The BIS can be used to monitor depth of anesthesia. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1155–1160)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research