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  • Author or Editor: William H. Miller Jr. x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Chlorpheniramine maleate was administered orally (2 mg, q12 h) to 26 cats with pruritic skin disease. Pruritus was completely eliminated in 19 cats, and was reduced by 50% in 1 cat. Six cats had no response to treatment. Serious or long-lasting clinical side effects were not observed in any cat.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

A retrospective study on the skin diseases of Chinese Shar Peis was conducted over a 9-year period. Skin disease was found in 58 (49.2%) of the 118 dogs studied. Folliculitis was the most common clinical finding (43 of 58 dogs). In 6 dogs, there was no apparent reason for the folliculitis; however, it was secondary to allergic dermatitis, demodicosis, IgA deficiency, or hypothyroidism in the other dogs. Approximately 20% of the dogs had more than one of these disorders. Serum IgA concentration was measured in 7 dogs and was low in all 7.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

In 100 dogs with 4 inflammatory dermatologic diseases, buffy coat preparations from edta-treated blood samples were examined cytologically. Fifty-four dogs had atopy, 26 had flea-bite hypersensitivity, 17 had sarcoptic mange, and 3 had food allergy. Twenty-eight dogs had 2 or more concurrent skin diseases; most of these had secondary pyoderma. Dogs did not have mast cell tumors. Thirteen samples contained 1 or more mast cells/4 slides reviewed. This study revealed that dogs with inflammatory skin diseases can have a few to many mast cells evident on cytologic examination of buffy coat preparations.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Thirty adult dogs with chronic generalized demodicosis were treated with oral administration of milbemycin oxime (0.52 to 3.8 mg/kg oj body weight, q 24 h). Results oj skin scrapings were used to determine whether administration oj milbemycin should be continued or discontinued. Dogs that were free of clinical signs of demodicosis 12 months after administration of milbemycin was discontinued were considered cured. Sixteen dogs were cured, 5 dogs were never cleared of mites, and 9 dogs were cleared of mites, but relapsed after administration of milbemycin was discontinued. Adverse effects of milbemycin were rare and transient.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

An in-office allergy screening kit was evaluated for its repeatability, sensitivity, and specificity in 21 atopic dogs. Results of this testing were compared with results of a full regionalized allergy test offered by the same manufacturer. Results of the screening kit were repeatable and had high specificity but poor sensitivity. The kit as presently marketed is of questionable value as a diagnostic aid for use in dogs with atopy.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine the efficacy of increased dosages of milbemycin oxime in the treatment of generalized demodicosis.

Design

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals

26 adult dogs with chronic generalized demodicosis.

Procedure

In phase 1, milbemycin was administered daily to 13 dogs at an approximate mean dosage of 1 mg/kg of body weight ( po) until 30 days after skin scrapings failed to detect mites. If the mite count had not decreased by 25% from the prior month's examination, the drug dosage was increased to approximately 2 mg/kg. Treatment was considered a failure if the mite count had not changed on 2 successive examinations. In phase 2 involving 13 other dogs, an approximate mean dosage of 2 mg/kg was used. If mite counts had not been reduced to 0 by 180 days, treatment was considered to have failed.

Results

In phase 1, when milbemycin was administered at the initial low dosage, 6 dogs were considered to have been cleared of mites. One of these relapsed 2 months after discontinuation of treatment. For the 7 dogs not cleared of mites, the dosage was doubled. Two of these were never cleared of mites. In phase 2, 12 of 13 dogs were cleared of mites after 60 to 180 days of treatment.

Clinical Implications

High-dose milbemycin was effective in the treatment of generalized demodicosis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association