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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the role of bacteria in bronchoscopically diagnosed tracheal collapse in dogs by evaluating qualitative results of bacteriologic cultures.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—37 dogs with tracheal collapse.

Procedure—Clinical records for dogs with tracheal collapse confirmed with bronchoscopy were reviewed. A protected catheter brush was used to obtain samples for bacteriologic culture from the large airways.

Results—Results of bacterial culture were negative for 5 of 29 dogs. For 24 dogs, 1 (n = 10), 2 (6), or ≥ 3 (8) species of bacteria were isolated. Pseudomonas spp were isolated most frequently (17/29), and a single Pseudomona ssp grew in 7 samples. Other bacteria included Enterobacter spp (4/29), Citrobacter spp (3/29), and Moraxella spp, Klebsiella spp, Bordetella spp, or Acinetobacter spp (2/29 dogs each). Anaerobic and aerobic cultures yielded positive results in samples from 2 dogs. Cytologic results were available for 13 dogs with positive results of bacteriologic culture; epithelial cells were reported most commonly. Five samples had a small number of neutrophils; bacteria were identified cytologically in 2 of 5 samples that contained neutrophils. Bacteria were also seen in 2 samples that lacked inflammatory cells.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bacteria are commonly isolated from samples obtained via airway brushing in dogs with tracheal collapse; however, in the absence of cytologic confirmation of inflammation or infection, an association between bacteria and clinical signs of tracheal collapse cannot be established. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2001;219:1247–1250)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Seventy-three aerobic bacterial isolates were cultured from 64 eyes of 63 horses with infectious keratitis. Forty-two (58%) of the organisms isolated initially were gram-positive (g+, 10 genera) and 31 (42%) were gram-negative (g-, 5 genera). After local antimicrobial treatment, repeat cultures from samples obtained from 15 eyes of hospitalized horses yielded 21 secondary bacterial isolates. Staphylococci spp and Streptococci spp were the most common g(+) isolates and accounted for 79% of g(+) organisms isolated initially. Antibiograms revealed ticarcillin to be the most efficacious antibiotic tested on g(+) organisms, with 28 of 30 (93%) being susceptible. Of commercially available topical ophthalmic antibiotics tested on g(+) organisms, erythromycin was the most efficacious, with 32 of 35 (91%) isolates being susceptible. Pseudomonas spp, Escherichia coli, and Acinetobacter spp accounted for 68% of g(-) organisms isolated initially. Gentamicin, tobramycin, polymyxin B, and neomycin were highly effective in vitro against initial g(-) isolates. Chloramphenicol was ineffective against g(+) and g(-) organisms isolated initially. A significantly (P < 0.05) higher frequency of g(-) organisms was noticed on repeat cultures after intensive topical antimicrobial treatments as compared to organisms isolated at initial examination. Pseudomonas organisms isolated from second cultures were resistant to gentamicin, but susceptible to ciprofloxacin. Overall, secondary g(-) isolates were more susceptible to ciprofloxacin, neomycin, tobramycin, or amikacin than to gentamicin. Fungi were isolated in 24 of 63 (38%) horses in the study. Twenty-five filamentous fungi and 2 yeasts were identified from 24 eyes. Aspergillus spp was the predominant fungi; it was detected in 17 of 22 (77%) eyes in which filamentous fungi were identified.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Salmonella choleraesuis was isolated in pure or mixed bacterial cultures from 153 swine necropsied between Jan 1, 1987 and Dec 31, 1990. Pneumonia was seen in 99 of 109 swine from which this bacterium was isolated in the absence of other pathogenic bacteria. Pneumonia was seen more frequently than hepatitis, splenomegaly, or colitis. Pleuropneumonia that was grossly indistinguishable from the pleuropneumonia associated with Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae was seen in 29 of 99 swine from which S choleraesuis was the only bacterium isolated.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association