Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 10 items for

  • Author or Editor: William C. Rebhun x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Objective

To determine the most common ocular lesions in horses with lymphosarcoma.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

79 horses histologically confirmed to have lymphosarcoma.

Procedure

Ophthalmic examinations were performed by a single individual.

Results

21 of 79 horses had lesions involving the eye or ocular adnexa. Infiltration of the palpebral conjunctiva and eyelids was the most common lesion (n = 11). Other lesions included uveitis (n = 4), corneoscleral masses (2), third eyelid masses (2), and diffuse retrobulbar infiltrates (2).

Clinical Implications

In horses with lymphosarcoma, ocular lesions may precede or be more obvious than lymph node enlargement or signs of visceral involvement. Early recognition of ocular lesions suggestive of lymphosarcoma may allow a more rapid diagnosis of lymphosarcoma in horses. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:852-854)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Chronic frontal sinusitis in 12 dairy cattle most often was associated with a history of dehorning, in which the sinus was entered (67%), or with respiratory tract disease (25%). The most common organisms isolated were Actinomyces pyogenes and Pasteurella multocida. Signs of infection did not develop for months in some cattle and were often intermittent. The most common clinical signs included anorexia, lethargy, fever, frontal bone distortion, exophthalmos, abnormal posture, nasal discharge, and neurologic abnormalities.

Treatment consisted of trephination at 2 sites, drainage and lavage of the sinus cavity, and administration of antibiotics and analgesics. Eight cattle responded well to treatment and were discharged, but 4 others had signs of cns involvement and died or were euthanatized.

Trephination of the frontal sinus cavity at carefully chosen sites and antibiotic treatment are indicated when sinusitis is suspected. Drainage of the sinus cavity is imperative to avoid extension of the infection into the cns.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

  • In animals with cancer, clinical signs that are not directly related to local or distant spread of the tumor are considered paraneoplastic.

  • Reported paraneoplastic disorders in horses with lymphoma include fever, hypercalcemia, and anemia.

  • Paraneoplastic pruritus and alopecia can develop in people with lymphoma; furthermore, lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnoses when examining horses with generalized pruritus for which another cause cannot be identified.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To evaluate the efficacy of itraconazole-dimethyl sulfoxide ointment for treatment of keratomycosis in horses in the northeastern United States.

Design—

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—

9 horses (10 affected eyes).

Procedure—

All horses treated for keratomycosis at Cornell University between July 1994 and July 1996 were included in the study. The diagnosis of keratomycosis was confirmed by cytologic examination, and all horses were treated with 0.25 ml of a 1% itraconazole-30% dimethyl sulfoxide petrolatum-based ointment, applied to the affected eye every 4 hours.

Results—

Topical application of itraconazole-dimethyl sulfoxide ointment (q 4 h) resolved keratomycosis in 8 of 10 eyes; mean duration of treatment was 34.6 days (range, 16 to 53 days).

Clinical Implications—

Results of this study indicate topical administration of itraconazole-dimethyl sulfoxide ointment may provide an additional treatment option for horses with keratomycosis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;211:199–203)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

Fourteen cows were subjected to thoracotomy as an aid in the treatment of either septic pericarditis (n = 7) or unilateral pleuritis (fibrous or purulent; n = 7). Thoracic lesions were primary in 4 cows, secondary to traumatic reticuloperitonitis in 9 cows, and secondary to extension of a liver abscess in 1 cow. Thoracotomy was performed on 9 cows under local anesthesia. Surgery was performed on 5 cows under general anesthesia; 2 died during anesthesia, and 2 others were euthanatized. Of the 10 cows allowed to recover from surgery, 4 had pericarditis and 6 had pleuritis. Four cows with pleuritis had thoracic abscesses. All but 1 cow with pericarditis died or were euthanatized, and 5 of the 6 cows with pleuritis were discharged from the hospital. A year after surgery, 1 cow was culled because of infertility, and the other 5 cows were returned to production.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To evaluate the association of physical examination and clinicopathologic findings with surgical findings in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration, to determine short- and long-term survival rates in these cattle, and to determine whether degree of peritonitis (focal vs diffuse) influences survival rates.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

21 cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration and 42 cattle with uncomplicated abomasal displacement.

Procedure

Information on signalment, stage of lactation, physical examination findings, clinicopathologic data, surgical diagnosis, procedure(s) performed, and necropsy findings were retrieved from medical records of all cattle included in this study. Differences between physical examination findings of cattle with concurrent disease and those of cattle with uncomplicated displacements were evaluated, as were differences between survival rates in cattle with focal versus diffuse peritonitis.

Results

Cattle with concurrent disease had a greater probability of having pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain identified on physical examination than did cattle with uncomplicated diseases. There was no relationship between clinicopathologic data and survival time. Short-term survival rate was 38%, and degree of peritonitis significantly influenced survival time in cattle with concurrent abomasal displacement and perforating ulceration. Long-term survival rate in these cattle was 14%.

Clinical Implications

Cattle with concurrent displaced abomasum and perforating ulceration have a poor chance for survival. In addition to detection of displaced abomasum, physical examination findings that can help lead to a presurgical diagnosis of this syndrome are pneumoperitoneum and signs of abdominal pain. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1442–1445)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary

The effect of prior Rhodococcus equi-induced pneumonia on pulmonary health was investigated in 5 horses (< 24 months old) using endoscopy, radiography, hematologic and bronchoalveolar lavage analyses, and pulmonary function testing. Rhodococcus equi-induced pnuemonia had been diagnosed in principal horses when they were foals. Diagnosis was based on positive results of transtracheal aspiration and thoracic radiography at the time of initial clinical examination. Results of reevalution of the respiratory system of these horses (R + ) were compared with those of 5 age-matched healthy horses (R −) that lacked clinical or historical evidence of foalhood pneumonia.

Significant differences in variables between the 2 groups of horses were not evident. In both groups, most horses had radiographic evidence of an accentuated bronchointerstitial pattern, although results of analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were normal and mononuclear cells predominated. Variability in results of the pulmonary function tests was observed within and between the 2 groups of horses. Only normalized dynamic lung compliance was slightly lower in the previously infected horses, but this difference was not significant. We concluded that horses previously infected with and successfuly treated for R equi-induced pneumonia do not have detectable evidence of residual lung damage.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To describe the clinical characteristics, treatments, outcomes, and factors associated with survival time in a cohort of dogs with lingual neoplasia that underwent surgical excision.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—97 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with a lingual tumor examined between 1995 and 2008 were reviewed. Records were included if a lingual tumor was confirmed by histologic examination and surgical excision of the mass was attempted. Data were recorded and analyzed to identify prognostic factors.

Results—Clinical signs were mostly related to the oral cavity. For 93 dogs, marginal excision, subtotal glossectomy, and near-total glossectomy were performed in 35 (38%), 55 (59%), and 3 (3%), respectively. Surgery-related complications were rare, but 27 (28%) dogs had tumor recurrence. The most common histopathologic diagnoses for the 97 dogs were squamous cell carcinoma (31 [32%]) and malignant melanoma (29 [30%]). Eighteen (19%) dogs developed metastatic disease, and the overall median survival time was 483 days. Median survival time was 216 days for dogs with squamous cell carcinoma and 241 days for dogs with malignant melanoma. Dogs with lingual tumors ≥ 2 cm in diameter at diagnosis had a significantly shorter survival time than did dogs with tumors < 2 cm.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Similar to previous studies, results indicated that lingual tumors are most commonly malignant, and squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma predominate. A thorough physical examination to identify lingual tumors at an early stage and surgical treatment after tumor identification are recommended because tumor size significantly affected survival time.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association