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  • Author or Editor: Wei Wang x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the effects of morphine-lidocaine-ketamine (MLK) and fentanyl-lidocaine-ketamine (FLK) combinations administered as constant rate infusions (CRIs) during and after veterinary procedures on postprocedure rectal temperature in dogs.

ANIMALS

32 clinically normal client-owned dogs undergoing nonemergent procedures.

PROCEDURES

Dogs were randomly assigned to receive an MLK or FLK combination (16 dogs/group). During the procedure, each dog received 2% lidocaine hydrochloride (1 mg/kg/h; both groups), ketamine hydrochloride (0.6 mg/kg/h; both groups), and morphine (0.36 mg/kg/h; MLK group) or fentanyl (4 μg/kg/h; FLK group) via CRI for analgesia; esophageal temperature was maintained at 37° to 39°C. At extubation, each drug dose in each assigned combination was halved and administered (via CRI) for 12 additional hours for postprocedure analgesia. Rectal temperature and other data were recorded at baseline (prior to administration of premedicants), extubation (0 hours), and 0.5, 1.5, 3, 6, and 12 hours thereafter.

RESULTS

Mean postprocedure rectal temperature was significantly lower at each postextubation time point for the MLK group, compared with corresponding values for the FLK group. Compared with the baseline value, mean postprocedure rectal temperature was significantly lower at 0, 0.5, 1.5, and 3 hours for the FLK group and at all postprocedure time points for the MLK group. Hypothermia (rectal temperature < 37°C) was detected at ≥ 1 postprocedure time point more often in dogs in the MLK group (9/16) than in the FLK group (1/16).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs that received an MLK combination for analgesia during and after a veterinary procedure developed hypothermia more commonly than did dogs that received an FLK combination under similar conditions.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine effects of cranberry extract on development of urinary tract infection (UTI) in dogs and on adherence of Escherichia coli to Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells.

ANIMALS 12 client-owned dogs (in vivo experiment) and 6 client-owned dogs (in vitro experiment).

PROCEDURES 12 dogs with a history of recurrent UTI received an antimicrobial (n = 6) or cranberry extract (6) orally for 6 months. Dogs were monitored for a UTI. For the in vitro experiment, cranberry extract was orally administered to 6 dogs for 60 days. Voided urine samples were collected from each dog before and 30 and 60 days after onset of extract administration. Urine was evaluated by use of a bacteriostasis assay. An antiadhesion assay and microscopic examination were used to determine inhibition of bacterial adherence to MDCK cells.

RESULTS None of the 12 dogs developed a UTI. The bacteriostasis assay revealed no zone of inhibition for any urine samples. Bacterial adhesion was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results for urine samples obtained before extract administration. Microscopic examination revealed that bacterial adherence to MDCK cells was significantly reduced after culture with urine samples obtained at 30 and 60 days, compared with results after culture with urine samples obtained before extract administration.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Oral administration of cranberry extract prevented development of a UTI and prevented E coli adherence to MDCK cells, which may indicate it has benefit for preventing UTIs in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate physiologic and biochemical effects of electroacupuncture and dexmedetomidine administration to goats.

ANIMALS 30 healthy adult goats.

PROCEDURES Goats were allotted to 5 groups (6 goats/group) and received electroacupuncture, dexmedetomidine (5 or 20 μg/kg, IM), electroacupuncture plus dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg, IM), or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution (IM [control treatment]). Pain threshold, cardiorespiratory effects, rectal temperature, and hematologic and biochemical variables were assessed.

RESULTS Dexmedetomidine (20 μg/kg) increased pain threshold and decreased heart rate, respiratory rate, and rectal temperature. Pain threshold of goats receiving electroacupuncture plus dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg) was higher than that of goats receiving electroacupuncture or of goats receiving dexmedetomidine at 5 μg/kg at 30 minutes, but did not differ from that of goats receiving dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg. Compared with goats administered dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg, goats receiving electroacupuncture plus dexmedetomidine at 5 μg/kg had a higher heart rate from 30 to 60 minutes and a higher respiratory rate from 5 to 60 minutes. Electroacupuncture plus dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg) did not affect rectal temperature. Serum glucose concentrations of goats receiving electroacupuncture plus dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg) were higher than for goats receiving dexmedetomidine at 5 μg/kg at 30 minutes but not for goats receiving dexmedetomidine at 20 μg/kg. Creatinine and BUN concentrations, alanine or aspartate aminotransferase activities, and hematologic variables of treated goats did not change.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Electroacupuncture in combination with a low dose of dexmedetomidine (5 μg/kg, IM) administered to goats provided antinociception.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a mutation in the fibrillin 2 gene (FBN2) is associated with canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and osteoarthritis in dogs.

Animals—-1,551 dogs.

Procedures—Hip conformation was measured radiographically. The FBN2 was sequenced from genomic DNA of 21 Labrador Retrievers and 2 Greyhounds, and a haplotype in intron 30 of FBN2 was sequenced in 90 additional Labrador Retrievers and 143 dogs of 6 other breeds. Steady-state values of FBN2 mRNA and control genes were measured in hip joint tissues of fourteen 8-month-old Labrador Retriever–Greyhound crossbreeds.

Results—The Labrador Retrievers homozygous for a 10-bp deletion haplotype in intron 30 of FBN2 had significantly worse CHD as measured via higher distraction index and extended-hip joint radiograph score and a lower Norberg angle and dorsolateral subluxation score. Among 143 dogs of 6 other breeds, those homozygous for the same deletion haplotype also had significantly worse radiographic CHD. Among the 14 crossbred dogs, as the dorsolateral subluxation score decreased, the capsular FBN2 mRNA increased significantly. Those dogs with incipient hip joint osteoarthritis had significantly increased capsular FBN2 mRNA, compared with those dogs without osteoarthritis. Dogs homozygous for the FBN2 deletion haplotype had significantly less FBN2 mRNA in their femoral head articular cartilage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The FBN2 deletion haplotype was associated with CHD. Capsular gene expression of FBN2 was confounded by incipient secondary osteoarthritis in dysplastic hip joints. Genes influencing complex traits in dogs can be identified by genome-wide screening, fine mapping, and candidate gene screening.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research