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  • Author or Editor: Wayne S. Rosenkrantz x
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Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the cumulative incidences of malignancies and benign skin masses and the mean age at death or euthanasia in dogs with allergic dermatitis treated long-term with versus without oclacitinib.

ANIMALS

660 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were searched to identify dogs with allergic dermatitis treated for ≥ 6 months with oclacitinib (exposed dogs; n = 339) versus other available treatments before the introduction of oclacitinib (nonexposed dogs; 321) and with ≥ 24 months of follow-up information available. Nonexposed dogs were age and breed matched with 321 of the exposed dogs; data for the remained 18 exposed dogs were included in statistical analyses. Results for cumulative incidences of malignancies and other variables were compared between groups, and the effect of daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib on cumulative incidences of malignancies and other skin masses was evaluated within the exposed group.

RESULTS

No meaningful differences were detected in the cumulative incidences of malignancies and overall skin masses or the mean age at death or euthanasia for dogs in the exposed group (16.5% [56/339], 56.6% [192/339], and 11.2 years [n = 80], respectively) versus the nonexposed group (12.8% [41/321], 58.3% [187/321], and 11.8 years [71], respectively). There was no association identified between daily maintenance dosage of oclacitinib and odds of malignancy or benign skin masses for dogs in the exposed group.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that long-term treatment with oclacitinib did not pose additional risk for malignancy in dogs; however, veterinarians should continue to observe FDA-approved label warning and precaution statements for oclacitinib and regularly screen for neoplasia in dogs with allergic skin disease treated with or without oclacitinib.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To detect and partially characterize papillomavirus (PV) DNA in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) tumor specimens from cats.

Sample Population—54 formalin-fixed paraffinembedded skin biopsy specimens were examined. Specimens originated from Bowenoid in situ SCC (BISC; n = 21), invasive SCC (22), and skin affected by miscellaneous nonneoplastic conditions (11).

Procedures—Samples from each tissue block underwent DNA extraction after deparaffinization, and PCR assays were performed. Two sets of primers derived from PV E1 were used. The first set of primers was designed for the narrow-range PCR assay and was able to generate amplification products of feline PV (FePV), canine oral PV, or closely related PVs. The second set of primers was selected for the broad-range PCR assay because of its ability to amplify DNA from 64 human PVs. Sequence analysis of each amplified DNA was performed.

Results—1 of the 21 specimens of BISC was positive for PV DNA on the basis of narrow-range PCR assay results, whereas all the other specimens (BISC, invasive SCC, and controls) had negative results for PV DNA. In contrast, 5 of 21 BISC specimens and 4 of 22 invasive SCC specimens were positive for PV DNA on the basis of broad-range PCR assay results. Sequence analysis revealed that only 1 specimen was infected by a virus closely related to classic FePV. In the 8 other specimens positive for PV DNA, DNA of unknown PVs was uncovered.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Bowenoid in situ SCC and invasive SCC of cats may be associated with PVs of genetic diversity.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

In collaboration with the American College of Veterinary Pathologists

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association