Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author or Editor: W. Wesley Sutter x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the buffy coat and apheresis methods for preparation of platelet concentrates from equine blood by comparing platelet and growth factor concentrations.

Animals—15 mature mixed-breed geldings.

Procedure—Whole blood samples were collected and processed by use of a buffy coat or apheresis method to obtain platelet poor and platelet concentrated fractions. The PCV, WBC count, and platelet count were compared among whole blood samples, platelet poor fractions, concentrates obtained by use of the apheresis method (ie, apheresis platelet concentrates), and concentrates obtained by use of the buffy coat method (ie, buffy coat platelet concentrates). Concentrations of transforming growth factor- β (ie, TGF-β1 and TGF-β2) and insulin-like growth factor were compared between buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates.

Results—Platelet concentrations were 8.9-fold and 5.2-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations were 13.1-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β1 concentrations were 2.8- fold and 3.1-fold greater in buffy coat and apheresis platelet concentrates, respectively, and TGF-β1 concentrations were 10.5-fold greater in filtered apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. TGF-β2 concentrations were 3.6-fold greater in apheresis platelet concentrates, compared with whole blood. Platelet concentrations correlated with growth factor concentrations across all blood and platelet fractions. White blood cell counts had a significant positive correlation with TGF-β1 concentration in buffy coat platelet concentrates.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Platelets and TGF-β1 can be concentrated reliably from equine blood by use of buffy coat or apheresis methods, without modification of the protocols used for humans. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:924–930)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine outcome of Standardbred racehorses with moderate to severe midbody suspensory ligament desmitis (MSD) treated by means of ultrasound-guided intralesional injection of a single dose of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) followed by a program of gradually increased exercise.

Design—Nonrandomized clinical trial.

Animals—9 Standardbred racehorses.

Procedures—Following injection of PRP, horses were allowed a controlled, gradual return to exercise. Race records for the year prior to injury and for 3 consecutive years after horses returned to racing were reviewed. For comparison purposes, race records of 9 Standardbred racehorses with no history of MSD racing at the same time were also reviewed.

Results—All 9 horses with MSD returned to racing after treatment; median time to return to racing was 32 weeks. All 9 horses raced at least once during the first and second years after returning to racing, but only 5 raced during the third year. When number of starts, total earnings, and earnings per start were compared between case and comparison horses, the only significant differences were number of starts during the third year after case horses returned to racing and earnings per start during the first year after case horses returned to racing, with values being significantly lower for case horses than for comparison horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that horses with moderate to severe MSD treated by means of intralesional injection of a single dose of PRP followed by a program of gradually increased exercise had an excellent prognosis for returning to racing.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association