Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: W. Cameron Black x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To determine cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) selectivity, pharmacokinetic properties, and in vivo efficacy of ML-1,785,713 in dogs.

Animals—21 healthy male and female mixed-breed dogs and 24 healthy male Beagles.

Procedure—Selectivity of ML-1,785,713 for inhibiting COX-2 was determined by comparing the potency for inhibiting cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) with that of COX-2 in canine blood. Pharmacokinetic properties were determined after IV (2 mg/kg) and oral (8 mg/kg) administration in female mixed-breed dogs. In vivo efficacy was evaluated in male mixed-breed dogs with urate crystal-induced synovitis. Prophylactic efficacy was evaluated by administering ML-1,785,713 two hours before induction of synovitis whereas therapeutic efficacy was determined by administering ML-1,785,713 one hour after induction of synovitis.

Results—Blood concentrations that resulted in 50% inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity in vitro were 119.1µM and 0.31µM, respectively, and selectivity ratio for inhibiting COX-2 relative to COX-1 was 384. ML-1,785,713 had high oral bioavailability (101%), low systemic clearance (7.7 mL/min/kg), and an elimination half-life of 5.9 hours. ML-1,785,713 was efficacious when administered prophylactically and therapeutically to dogs with urate crystal-induced synovitis.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—ML-1,785,713 is a novel, potent COX-2 inhibitor that is the most selective COX-2 inhibitor described for use in dogs to date. ML-1,785,713 has oral bioavailability and low systemic clearance that is comparable to other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It is effective after prophylactic and therapeutic administration in attenuating lameness in dogs with urate crystal-induced synovitis. Drugs that specifically inhibit COX-2 and not COX-1 at therapeutic doses may have an improved tolerability profile, compared with nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. (Am J Vet Res 2004;65:503–512)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 selectivity, pharmacokinetic properties, and in vivo efficacy of firocoxib (ML-1,785,713) in cats.

Animals—5 healthy male and 14 healthy female domestic shorthair cats.

Procedure—Selectivity of firocoxib for inhibiting COX-2 was determined by comparing the potency for inhibiting COX-1 with that of COX-2 in feline blood. Pharmacokinetic properties were determined after IV (2 mg/kg) and oral (3 mg/kg) administration in male cats. In vivo efficacy was evaluated in female cats with lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pyrexia with administration of firocoxib 1 or 14 hours before LPS challenge.

Results—Blood concentrations resulting in 50% inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 activity in vitro were 7.5 ± 2µM and 0.13 ± 0.03µM, respectively, and selectivity for inhibiting COX-2 relative to COX-1 was 58. Firocoxib had moderate to high oral bioavailability (54% to 70%), low plasma clearance (4.7 to 5.8 mL/min/kg), and an elimination half-life of 8.7 to 12.2 hours. Firocoxib at doses from 0.75 to 3 mg/kg was efficacious in attenuating fever when administered to cats 1 or 14 hours before LPS challenge.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Firocoxib is a potent COX-2 inhibitor and is the only selective COX-2 inhibitor described for use in cats to date. It is effective in attenuating febrile responses in cats when administered 14 hours before LPS challenge, suggesting it would be suitable for once-a-day dosing. Because selective COX-2 inhibitors have an improved therapeutic index relative to nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs in humans, firocoxib has the potential to be a safe, effective anti-inflammatory agent for cats. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1278–1284)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research