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  • Author or Editor: Vicki J. Jameson x
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Summary:

A study was undertaken to determine the effect chemotherapy had when used to treat 45 dogs with measurable metastatic osteosarcoma. The primary tumor was histologically confirmed as an osteosarcoma in each case. Thirty-nine dogs had the primary tumor surgically removed. Twenty-four of these dogs were treated adjunctively with cisplatin (70 mg/m2 of body surface, IV, q 3 weeks; median 2 doses, range 1 to 6 doses) prior to the onset of metastasis. The remaining 6 dogs from which the primary tumor was not surgically removed were diagnosed as having metastatic osteosarcoma in addition to the primary tumor on initial examination.

The median time from initial examination until the development of metastatic disease was 115 days (range, 27 to 1,199 days). The location of the metastatic disease was lungs (31 dogs), bone (3 dogs), soft tissue (1 dog), and multiple sites including lungs, bone, and soft tissue sites (10 dogs). The metastatic lesions were confirmed by pretreatment biopsy (n = 8) or cytologic evaluation (n = 2) in 10 cases and at necropsy in 27 cases. The remaining 8 cases were diagnosed radiographically as multiple metastatic lesions in the lungs consistent with metastatic osteosarcoma.

The metastatic disease was treated with cisplatin in 31 dogs (70 mg/m2, IV, q 3 weeks; median 2 doses, range 1 to 4 doses), doxorubicin in 11 dogs (30 mg/m2, IV, q 3 weeks; median 2 doses, range 1 to 3 doses), and mitoxantrone in 3 dogs (5 mg/m2, IV, q 3 weeks; median 2 doses, range 1 to 3 doses). Eight dogs that had metastatic disease treated with cisplatin were also given doxorubicin; 2 dogs treated with either doxorubicin or mitoxantrone were treated subsequently with cisplatin. The extent of neoplastic disease was determined immediately before the first dose of chemotherapy, and then every 3 to 6 weeks thereafter unless the dog had signs compatible with progressive disease, in which case, an evaluation was done more frequently. Each dog was treated with one chemotherapeutic agent until the dog developed progressive disease, or until the dog's quality of life diminished to an unacceptable level as determined by the owner or attending veterinarian. One dog treated with doxorubicin achieved partial remission. The duration of the partial remission was 21 days, and the lesion was confirmed to be osteosarcoma on necropsy 159 days after the metastatic disease was diagnosed. The median survival time of the other 44 dogs that did not respond to treatment from the time the metastatic disease was diagnosed was 61 days (range, 14 to 192 days). Cisplatin, doxorubicin, and mitoxantrone chemotherapy appear to be ineffective for the treatment of measurable metastatic osteosarcoma in the dog.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Summary:

We evaluated the development of nephrotoxicosis in 64 dogs with malignant neoplasia given cisplatin during 4-hour saline solution diuresis. Cisplatin (70 mg/m2 of body surface area, iv, q 21 d) was given to 8 dogs once, 22 dogs twice, 9 dogs 3 times, and 25 dogs 4 times. For each treatment, cisplatin was given over a 20-minute period after saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was administered iv for 3 hours at a rate of 25 ml/kg/h. After cisplatin infusion, saline solution diuresis was continued at the same rate for 1 hour. Before each treatment with cisplatin, the dogs were evaluated by conducting a physical examination, cbc, and analysis of serum urea nitrogen and creatinine concentrations, and in most cases, serum phosphorus concentration and urine specific gravity were determined. Exogenous creatinine clearance also was evaluated in 8 dogs prior to 1 (n = 8), 2 (n = 8), 3 (n = 6), and 4 (n = 4) treatments. Five (7.8%) of 64 dogs developed clinically evident renal disease after two (n = 3) and three (n = 2) doses of cisplatin. Two of the 5 dogs had preexisting diseases of the urinary tract prior to the start of treatment. Survival time in dogs that developed renal disease (median, 114 days; range, 26 to 273 days) was similar to that of all dogs in this study (median, 145 days; range, 5 to 586 days), with 30 dogs still alive at the conclusion of the study. Three of the 5 dogs that developed renal disease were alive at the conclusion of the study, 1 died of tumor-related causes, and another died as a direct result of nephrotoxicosis. There was a significant (P < 0.05) decrease in median neutrophil counts and a significant (P < 0.05) increase in median creatinine concentrations prior to the third and fourth treatments, compared with pretreatment values. Therefore, the 4-hour saline solution diuresis protocol used in this study to administer up to 4 doses of cisplatin appeared to be effective in preventing clinically apparent nephrotoxicosis in dogs with tumors and without preexisting urinary tract disease.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

SUMMARY

A study was undertaken to determine the toxic effects of cisplatin, an antineoplastic agent, when administered immediately after a 1-hour saline diuresis. Four treatments with cisplatin (70 mg/m2 of body surface, q 3 wk) were administered iv to 6 healthy dogs over a 20-minute period after 0.9% NaCl (saline) solution was administered iv for 1 hour at a volume of 132 ml (kg)0.75. Each dog vomited at least once within 8 hours after each treatment was administered. Clinical status, body weight, and food consumption were normal throughout the 12-week study for 5 of the 6 dogs. The sixth dog developed acute renal failure and became acutely blind and deaf within 3 days after the fourth treatment with cisplatin. Serum electrolyte, creatinine, and urea nitrogen values remained within established normal limits in all dogs immediately prior to each treatment, and in 5 of 6 dogs evaluated 3 weeks after the final treatment. The serum creatinine value (3.3 mg/dl) obtained from the Beagle euthanatized 2 weeks after the fourth treatment was above established normal values. Despite normalcy for all but 1 of the creatinine values, serum creatinine concentration obtained 3 weeks after the final treatment with cisplatin was significantly (P = 0.0001) higher than pretreatment values. When compared with data from all other evaluation periods, significant decreases in glomerular filtration rate, as determined by exogenous (P ≤ 0.0001) and endogenous (P ≤ 0.0001) creatinine clearance testing, were identified 3 weeks after the fourth treatment with cisplatin. Neutrophil counts decreased significantly below pretreatment values at the third (P = 0.009), fourth (P < 0.0001), and fifth (P < 0.0001) evaluation period. We concluded that cisplatin can be administered with biochemical evidence, but not necessarily clinical evidence, that renal dysfunction may develop after 4 treatments with cisplatin (70 mg/m2, iv) are administered to dogs, using a 1-hour diuresis protocol.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research