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  • Author or Editor: Verena K. Affolter x
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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare detection rates of feline herpesvirus 1 (FHV-1) DNA in skin biopsy specimens from cats with herpetic dermatitis, cats with nonherpetic dermatitis, and cats without dermatitis.

Design—Prevalence survey.

Animals—5 cats (9 biopsy specimens) with herpetic ulcerative dermatitis, 14 cats (17 biopsy specimens) with nonherpetic ulcerative dermatitis, and 8 cats (21 biopsy specimens) without clinically apparent skin lesions.

Procedures—A single-phase PCR assay was used to detect FHV-1 DNA in biopsy specimens. Assay results were compared with results of histologic examination.

Results—FHV-1 DNA was detected in all 9 biopsy specimens from the 5 cats with herpetic dermatitis and in 1 of 17 biopsy specimens from the 14 cats with nonherpetic dermatitis, but was not detected in any of the 21 biopsy specimens from the 8 cats without dermatitis. When results of histologic examination were used as the gold standard, sensitivity and specificity of the PCR assay were 100% and 95%, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirmed that FHV-1 DNA can be detected in the skin of cats with herpetic dermatitis and suggest that the virus may play a causative role in the disease. In addition, the PCR assay may be useful in confirming a diagnosis of herpetic dermatitis.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To describe clinical manifestations of cutaneous and ocular habronemiasis in horses and evaluate outcome of treatment.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—63 horses.

Procedure—The diagnosis was made on the basis of history, clinical signs, and identification of calcified concretions (sulfur granules) in lesions. Histologic examination of biopsy specimens was used to confirm the diagnosis. Case horses were compared with a control population of 12,720 horses examined during the same period.

Results—Arabians, gray horses, and horses with diluted coat colors were overrepresented; Thoroughbreds were underrepresented. Lesions were identified most often during the summer and early fall. The medial canthus of the eye, male genitalia, third eyelid, and distal portions of the extremities were the most commonly affected locations. Twenty-five lesions were biopsied, and results of histologic examination were consistent with a diagnosis of habronemiasis. However, nematode larvae were seen in only 11 (44%) biopsy specimens. Treatment consisted of surgical removal (7 horses) or medical treatment (56) consisting of debulking granulation tissue and topical, intralesional, or systemic treatment with corticosteroids. All horses were treated with ivermectin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that cutaneous and ocular habronemiasis should be considered when examining a horse during the summer months with a proliferative, moist, granulomatous lesion. Treatment should be aimed at decreasing the size of the lesion, reducing inflammation, and preventing recurrence. In general, the prognosis was good, and healing occurred within a few weeks. Fly control and regular deworming with ivermectin are recommended to reduce the incidence of habronemiasis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;222: 978–982)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether CT provides unique information about the treatment or prognosis for horses with ethmoid hematoma (EH).

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—16 horses with EH.

Procedures—Horses with a diagnosis of EH that had undergone a diagnostic CT study were included. Clinical features, treatment, outcome, radiographic and CT images, and histologic specimens were reviewed.

Results—CT provided new diagnostic information that affected treatment in 10 of 16 horses. Bilateral disease occurred in 8 of 16 horses and was undetected in 5 horses prior to CT. Paranasal sinus involvement occurred in all horses, but was incompletely defined prior to CT in 7 of 16 horses. The sphenopalatine sinus was affected in 6 of 16 horses as detected on CT; 4 of 6 of these were bilaterally affected. Medical and surgical treatments were performed. Six of 10 horses had a successful outcome, with recurrence in 4 of 10. Five of 6 patients in which treatment addressed all lesion sites identified by CT had a successful outcome. Bilateral disease did not confer a poor prognosis when all affected sites were treated. Sphenopalatine sinus involvement may have been associated with recurrence.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—CT provided anatomic information that may facilitate effective treatment of horses with EH, particularly in patients with bilateral disease and paranasal sinus involvement. Computed tomography is recommended for patients in which the lesion cannot be viewed endoscopically, when sinus involvement or multifocal disease are suspected, or when the lesion has been unresponsive to treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 10-year-old Lipizzaner stallion was evaluated over the course of 1.5 years because of intermittent, recurrent colic.

Clinical Findings—The horse was initially treated medically for gastric ulcers; dietary changes were made, and a deworming protocol was instituted, without resolution of colic episodes. Subsequently, the horse underwent exploratory celiotomy and a large colon volvulus was identified with diffuse colonic wall thickening. A pelvic flexure biopsy sample was submitted for histologic examination, which revealed lymphocytic (CD3-positive T cells) myenteric ganglionitis (MG). The horse developed a cecal impaction after surgery, which did not resolve, despite aggressive medical management; subsequently a complete cecal bypass was performed. Cecal and colonic wall biopsy samples were evaluated histologically and confirmed the diagnosis of MG. After surgery, the horse developed a large colon impaction, which initially responded to aggressive medical treatment, and the horse was discharged.

Treatment and Outcome—Despite rigorous feed restrictions and prokinetic and corticosteroid treatment, the horse continued to have signs of colic and was euthanized 3 weeks after discharge from the hospital because of a recurrent large colon impaction. Intestinal biopsy samples obtained at the time of death revealed chronic changes in intramural ganglia consistent with generalized MG.

Clinical Relevance—MG is a rare disease in horses, causing gastrointestinal motility dysfunction and signs of colic, which is challenging to diagnose and treat successfully. Further studies are needed to identify the etiology of this disease and to explore treatment options.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association