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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare bacteriologic culture results for superficial swab and tissue biopsy specimens obtained from dogs with open skin wounds.

ANIMALS

52 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

For each dog, 1 wound underwent routine preparation prior to collection of 2 specimens, 1 by superficial swab (Levine) technique and 1 by tissue biopsy. Specimens were processed for bacteriologic culture. Two observers determined whether any detected difference in culture results for the 2 types of specimen would have resulted in differing treatment plans.

RESULTS

Culture results of swab and tissue biopsy specimens were identical in 11/52 (21.2%) cases. Tissue biopsy specimen and swab cultures yielded positive results for 44 (84.6%) and 40 (76.9%) wounds, respectively. With regard to mean recovery rates of bacteria from wounds with positive culture results, both the biopsy specimens and swabs yielded 3.4 bacterial species/wound. All wounds for which swab cultures yielded no growth also had negative culture results for biopsy specimens. Biopsy specimen and swab culture results were in agreement with regard to the most common bacteria cultured. In 7/52 (13%) wounds, the observers would have treated the patient differently on the basis of the results of the 2 cultures.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results indicated that culture of a swab collected by the Levine technique is an appropriate noninvasive alternative to culture of a tissue biopsy specimen. A negative result obtained from culture of a swab is likely to be reliable. Disagreement between the results of swab and tissue biopsy specimen cultures is likely of low clinical importance.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To characterize abdominal lymphatic drainage in cats after thoracic duct ligation (TDL) and cisterna chyli ablation (CCA).

ANIMALS

7 purpose-bred research cats.

PROCEDURES

Baseline CT lymphangiography was performed. A popliteal lymph node was injected with iohexol, and images were acquired at 5-minute intervals for 15 minutes. Cats underwent TDL and CCA; methylene blue was used to aid in identifying lymphatic vessels. The CT lymphangiography was repeated immediately after and 30 days after surgery. All cats were euthanized and necropsied.

RESULTS

Results of baseline CT lymphangiography were unremarkable for all 7 cats. Only 5 cats completed the study. Leakage of contrast medium at the level of the cisterna chyli was seen on CT lymphangiography images obtained from all cats immediately after surgery. Evaluation of 30-day postoperative CT lymphangiography images revealed small branches entering the caudal vena cava in 2 cats, leakage of contrast medium into the caudal vena cava with no visible branches in 1 cat, and no contrast medium in the caudal vena cava in 2 cats. Contrast medium did not flow beyond the level of the cisterna chyli in any cat. Gross examination during necropsy revealed that all cats had small lymphatic vessels that appeared to connect to local vasculature identified in the region of the cisterna chyli.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Abdominal lymphaticovenous anastomoses formed after TDL and CCA in cats. This would support use of these procedures for treatment of cats with idiopathic chylothorax, although additional studies with clinically affected cats are warranted.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate outcomes of dogs and owner satisfaction and perception of their dogs’ adaptation following amputation of a thoracic or pelvic limb.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—64 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs that underwent limb amputation at a veterinary teaching hospital between 2005 and 2012 were reviewed. Signalment, body weight, and body condition scores at the time of amputation, dates of amputation and discharge from the hospital, whether a thoracic or pelvic limb was amputated, and reason for amputation were recorded. Histologic diagnosis and date of death were recorded if applicable. Owners were interviewed by telephone about their experience and interpretation of the dog's adaptation after surgery. Associations between perioperative variables and postoperative quality of life scores were investigated.

Results—58 of 64 (91%) owners perceived no change in their dog's attitude after amputation; 56 (88%) reported complete or nearly complete return to preamputation quality of life, 50 (78%) indicated the dog's recovery and adaptation were better than expected, and 47 (73%) reported no change in the dog's recreational activities. Body condition scores and body weight at the time of amputation were negatively correlated with quality of life scores after surgery. Taking all factors into account, most (55/64 [86%]) respondents reported they would make the same decision regarding amputation again, and 4 (6%) indicated they would not; 5 (8%) were unsure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—This information may aid veterinarians in educating clients about adaptation potential of dogs following limb amputation and the need for postoperative weight control in such patients. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2015;247:786–792)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

As a result of vehicular trauma, a 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat sustained luxation of the sacrocaudal joint and a urethral tear.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

Retrograde contrast urethrocystography revealed a urethral tear at the level of the ischiatic tuberosity. Conservative treatment for 7 days with a urethral catheter was unsuccessful.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

An approach for a perineal urethrostomy was performed and revealed a large urethral tear (4 mm in length in a craniocaudal orientation and encompassing approx 50% of the urethral circumference) proximal to the bulbourethral glands. Urethroplasty was performed with a graft of a rectangular section of single-layer porcine small intestinal submucosa. Perineal urethrostomy was then completed routinely, and a urethral catheter was left in place for 5 days. Two days after removal of the urethral catheter, stranguria was noted. Retrograde contrast urethrocystography revealed a urethral stricture. Balloon dilation of the urethral stricture was performed, and the cat's stranguria improved. Ten weeks following balloon dilation, the cat developed hematuria, and a urinary tract infection and urethral stricture were diagnosed. Balloon dilation was repeated with instillation of triamcinolone solution at the stricture site. Eighteen months later (approx 21 months after the initial surgery), the cat was urinating normally.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

The outcome for the cat of this report indicated that porcine small intestinal submucosa may be used to successfully augment urethroplasty for treatment of traumatic urethral tears in cats. Urethral balloon dilation with triamcinolone instillation may be used to treat postoperative urethral strictures.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION

A 4-year-old spayed female French Bulldog was referred for treatment of a suspected right-sided nasal angiofibroma associated with a 4-month history of unilateral nasal discharge and stertor.

CLINICAL FINDINGS

The dog appeared healthy other than right-sided mucoid debris and decreased airflow through the right naris. The dog was anesthetized, and a large intranasal mass was observed obstructing the right nasal passage and abutting the nasal septum.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME

A lateral rhinotomy was performed, and rigid endoscopes (0° and 30°) were used to examine the right nasal cavity. The mass filled the anterior aspect of the nasal cavity and involved a portion of the nasal turbinates with some erosion. A coblation unit was used to ablate tumor tissue laterally to remove the tumor in piecemeal fashion. Recovery was routine with only minor epistaxis after surgery, and the dog was discharged the next day. Eight months after surgery, follow-up CT revealed right-sided nasal turbinate and conchal atrophy consistent with prior mass ablation. No macroscopic recurrence was detected, and the owners reported only rare, clear rhinorrhea.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Findings suggested that coblation may be an alternative to radiation therapy for vascular tumors with minimal invasion and low metastatic potential.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate skin perfusion in cats receiving dexmedetomidine compared to a placebo.

ANIMALS

9 healthy adult research cats.

METHODS

A randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled study design was used. Two sites, the dorsal metatarsus (site: limb) and lateral flank (site: flank), were evaluated with laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) at baseline and following administration of dexmedetomidine (1, 3, or 5 mcg/kg, IV) or a placebo (0.9% saline, IV). Mean speckle contrast (MSC), a surrogate for perfusion, was obtained from LSCI and compared between treatments. Heart rate, sedation score, and body temperature were recorded. Skin perfusion to the flank and limb, reported as MSC, was assessed via LSCI at baseline and at 5, 10, and 15 minutes posttreatment.

RESULTS

There was a significant decrease in heart rate (P < .001) in cats receiving 1, 3, and 5 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine compared to placebo. There was a significant increase in median sedation score at all time points postsedation compared to baseline (P < .018). Changes in MSC for the metatarsus were not significantly different between treatments at any time point (P = .12). For the flank, MSC was significantly higher for cats treated with dexmedetomidine compared to baseline (P ≤ .01). Skin perfusion to the flank decreased as early as 5 minutes posttreatment with dexmedetomidine and persisted for at least 15 minutes, regardless of dexmedetomidine dose.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dexmedetomidine decreased skin perfusion in cats, even at low doses. Veterinarians may elect for an alternative sedative medication when decreased skin perfusion is a concern.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To describe short-term outcomes of dogs and cats undergoing surgery for traumatic bile peritonitis.

ANIMALS

13 dogs and 4 cats.

METHODS

Multi-institutional, retrospective study. Medical records from 6 institutions were reviewed for cases of traumatic bile peritonitis between 2006 and 2022. Clinical presentation, additional injuries, surgical treatment, and outcome were recorded.

RESULTS

Trauma occurred a median of 2 (range, 1 to 22) and 4 (range, 1 to 22) days prior to presentation in dogs and cats, respectively. Total bilirubin was increased in 11 of 13 dogs and 2 of 4 cats. Rupture occurred at the common bile duct (CBD) in 10 dogs and 1 cat, gallbladder in 3 dogs, cystic duct in 2 cats, and hepatic duct in 1 dog and 1 cat. The most common surgeries were cholecystoduodenostomy and CBD repair in dogs and cholecystectomy in cats. Eleven of 13 dogs and all cats survived to hospital discharge (88.2% overall survival). Median follow-up in surviving dogs and cats was 35 days (range, 14 to 401) and 30 days (range, 14 to 90), respectively. One dog that underwent cholecystectomy experienced recurrent bile peritonitis 20 days postoperatively. Short-term survival following surgical treatment of traumatic bile peritonitis was excellent and recurrence appears uncommon. The most frequent site of rupture was the CBD in dogs and the cystic duct in cats.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Measurement of peritoneal bilirubin should be considered in dogs and cats with peritoneal effusion following trauma. Surgeons should be prepared to identify and address ruptures in locations other than the gallbladder.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To conduct a retrospective multi-institutional study reporting short- and long-term outcomes of adrenalectomy in patients presenting with acute hemorrhage secondary to spontaneous adrenal rupture.

ANIMALS

59 dogs and 3 cats.

METHODS

Medical records of dogs and cats undergoing adrenalectomy between 2000 and 2021 for ruptured adrenal masses were reviewed. Data collected included clinical presentation, preoperative diagnostics, surgical report, anesthesia and hospitalization findings, histopathology, adjuvant treatments, and long-term outcome (recurrence, metastasis, and survival).

RESULTS

Median time from hospital admission to surgery was 3 days, with 34% of surgeries being performed emergently (within 1 day of presentation). Need for intraoperative blood transfusion was significantly associated with emergent surgery and presence of active intraoperative hemorrhage. The short-term (≤ 14 days) complication and mortality rates were 42% and 21%, respectively. Negative prognostic factors for short-term survival included emergent surgery, intraoperative hypotension, and performing additional surgical procedures. Diagnoses included adrenocortical neoplasia (malignant [41%], benign [12%], and undetermined [5%]), pheochromocytoma (38%), a single case of adrenal fibrosis and hemorrhage (2%), and a single case of hemangiosarcoma (2%). Local recurrence and metastasis of adrenocortical carcinoma were confirmed in 1 and 3 cases, respectively. Overall median survival time was 574 days and 900 days when short-term mortality was censored. No significant relationship was found between histopathological diagnosis and survival.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Adrenalectomy for ruptured adrenal gland masses was associated with similar short- and long-term outcomes as compared with previously reported nonruptured cases. If hemodynamic stability can be achieved, delaying surgery and limiting additional procedures appear indicated to optimize short-term survival.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the outcome in dogs diagnosed with congenital extrahepatic portosystemic shunts (EHPSS) at ≥ 5 years of age treated with medical management only (M) or with surgical attenuation (S). The hypothesis was that dogs undergoing surgical attenuation would have a longer survival time than dogs undergoing medical management only.

ANIMALS

351 dogs definitively diagnosed with EHPSS at ≥ 5 years of age.

PROCEDURES

Medical records from 2009 to 2019 at 16 veterinary teaching hospitals were evaluated. Data collected included signalment, clinical signs at diagnosis, clinicopathologic data, surgical and medical treatments, shunt morphology, clinical signs and medical treatments at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis, and survival time.

RESULTS

351 dogs (M, 119 [33.9%]; S, 232 [66.1%]) were included in the study. Survival time was longer with surgery than medical management (hazard ratio, 4.2; M, 3.4 years; S, 10.9 years). Continued clinical signs at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis were more common with medical management (M, 40% [33/88]; S, 14% [21/155]). Continued medical treatments at 6 to 12 months after diagnosis were more common in the medical management group (M, 78% [69/88]; S, 34% [53/155]). Perioperative mortality rate was 7.3%.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Dogs diagnosed at ≥ 5 years of age with EHPSS have significantly better survival times and fewer clinical signs with surgical attenuation, compared with medical management. Older dogs have similar surgical mortality rates to dogs of all ages after surgical EHPSS attenuation.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association