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  • Author or Editor: Valentina De Monte x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effectiveness of reduction of inspired oxygen fraction (Fio 2) or application of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) after an alveolar recruitment maneuver (ARM) in minimizing anesthesia-induced atelectasis in dogs.

Animals—30 healthy female dogs.

Procedures—During anesthesia and neuromuscular blockade, dogs were mechanically ventilated under baseline conditions (tidal volume, 12 mL/kg; inspiratory-to-expiratory ratio, 1:2; Fio 2, 1; and zero end-expiratory pressure [ZEEP]). After 40 minutes, lungs were inflated (airway pressure, 40 cm H2O) for 20 seconds. Dogs were then exposed to baseline conditions (ZEEP100 group), baseline conditions with Fio 2 reduced to 0.4 (ZEEP40 group), or baseline conditions with PEEP at 5 cm H2O (PEEP100 group; 10 dogs/group). For each dog, arterial blood gas variables and respiratory system mechanics were evaluated and CT scans of the thorax were obtained before and at 5 (T5) and 30 (T30) minutes after the ARM.

Results—Compared with pre-ARM findings, atelectasis decreased and Pao 2:Fio 2 ratio increased at T5 in all groups. At T30, atelectasis and oxygenation returned to pre-ARM findings in the ZEEP100 group but remained similar to T5 findings in the other groups. At T5 and T30, lung static compliance in the PEEP100 group was higher than values in the other groups.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Application of airway pressure of 40 cm H2O for 20 seconds followed by Fio 2 reduction to 0.4 or ventilation with PEEP (5 cm H2O) was effective in diminishing anesthesia-induced atelectasis and maintaining lung function in dogs, compared with the effects of mechanical ventilation providing an Fio 2 of 1.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the effects of 10 cm H2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on lung aeration and gas exchange in mechanically ventilated sheep during general anesthesia induced and maintained with propofol.

Animals—10 healthy adult Bergamasca sheep.

Procedures—Sheep were sedated with diazepam (0.4 mg/kg, IV). Anesthesia was induced with propofol (5 mg/kg, IV) and maintained with propofol via constant rate infusion (0.4 mg/kg/min). Muscular paralysis was induced by administration of vecuronium (25 μg/kg, bolus IV) to facilitate mechanical ventilation. After intubation, sheep were positioned in right lateral recumbency and mechanically ventilated with pure oxygen and zero end-expiratory pressure (ZEEP). After 60 minutes, 10 cm H2O of PEEP was applied for 20 minutes. Spiral computed tomography of the thorax was performed, and data were recorded for hemodynamic and gas exchange variables and indicators of respiratory mechanics after 15 (T15), 30 (T30), and 60 (T60) minutes of ZEEP and after 20 minutes of PEEP (TPEEP). Computed tomography images were analyzed to determine the extent of atelectasis before and after PEEP application.

Results—At TPEEP, the volume of poorly aerated and atelectatic compartments was significantly smaller than at T15, T30, and T60, which indicated that there was PEEP-induced alveolar recruitment and clearance of anesthesia-induced atelectasis. Arterial oxygenation and static respiratory system compliance were significantly improved by use of PEEP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pulmonary atelectasis can develop in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated sheep breathing pure oxygen; application of 10 cm H2O of PEEP significantly improved lung aeration and gas exchange.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the impact of 2 tidal volumes (TVs) with or without positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on lung mechanics, aeration, and gas exchange in healthy anesthetized dogs.

ANIMALS 40 mixed-breed dogs with healthy lungs.

PROCEDURES Anesthetized dogs were randomly assigned to 4 groups (n = 10/group) with different ventilatory settings: TV of 8 mL/kg and PEEP of 0 cm H2O (low TV group), TV of 8 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H2O (low TV plus PEEP group), TV of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 0 cm H2O (high TV group), or TV of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H2O (high TV plus PEEP group). Expired CO2 and respiratory rate were titrated on the basis of a predetermined stepwise protocol. Gas exchange, respiratory mechanics, and pulmonary aeration were evaluated by means of CT 30 minutes after starting mechanical ventilation at the assigned setting.

RESULTS Partial pressures of arterial and expired CO2 were higher in the low TV and low TV plus PEEP groups than in the high TV and high TV plus PEEP groups. Peak and plateau airway pressures were higher in the PEEP group than in the other groups. Static lung compliance was higher in the high TV plus PEEP group than in the low TV group. Relative percentages of atelectatic and poorly aerated lung were lower in the high TV plus PEEP group than in the other groups. Oxygenation was similar among groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Differences in TV and PEEP application during mechanical ventilation may affect respiratory function in anesthetized dogs with healthy lungs. Ventilation with a TV of 15 mL/kg and PEEP of 5 cm H2O significantly improved lung compliance and reduced the amount of atelectatic and poorly aerated lung.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of the oxygen content–based index, Fshunt, as an indicator of venous admixture (s/t) at various fractions of inspired oxygen (Fio 2s) in anesthetized sheep undergoing Flung or 2-lung ventilation.

Animals—6 healthy adult female sheep.

Procedures—Sheep were anesthetized and administered 5 different Fio 2s (0.21, 0.40, 0.60, 0.80, and 1.00) in random order during 2-lung mechanical ventilation. Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were obtained at each Fio 2 after a 15-minute stabilization period. Vital capacity alveolar recruitment maneuvers were performed after blood collection. The previously used Fio 2 sequence was reversed for sample collection during Flung ventilation. Blood samples were analyzed for arterial, pulmonary end-capillary, and mixed venous oxygen content and partial pressure and for hemoglobin concentration. Oxygen hemoglobin saturation, s/t, Fshunt, and oxygen tension–based indices (OTIs; including Pao 2:Fio 2, alveolar-arterial difference in partial pressure of oxygen [Pao 2 – Pao 2], [Pao 2 – Pao 2]:Fio 2, [Pao 2 – Pao 2]:Pao 2, and Pao 2:Pao 2) were calculated at each Fio 2; associations were evaluated with linear regression analysis, concordance, and correlation tests. Intermethod agreement between s/t and Fshunt was tested via Bland-Altman analysis.

Results—Strong and significant associations and substantial agreement were detected between Fshunt and s/t. Relationships between OTIs and s/t varied, but overall correlations were weak.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Whereas OTIs were generally poor indicators of s/t, Fshunt was a good indicator of s/t at various Fio 2s, regardless of the magnitude of s/t, and could be potentially used as a surrogate for s/t measurements in healthy sheep.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe ultrasonographic findings and outcomes for dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 43 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES Records for dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns examined between 2010 and 2013 were reviewed. Ultrasonographic images and additional information such as signalment and pleural fluid analysis, radiographic, bronchoscopic, and CT findings were collected. Surgical treatments and outcomes were also reviewed.

RESULTS Transthoracic or transesophageal ultrasonography revealed grass awns in the pleural space (n = 13) or pulmonary parenchyma (10) of 23 dogs. Surgical removal of grass awns was successful on the first attempt in 21 of these 23 dogs (including 11/23 that had intraoperative ultrasonography performed to aid localization and removal of the awn). In the remaining 2 dogs, a second surgery was required. Twenty dogs with evidence of migrating intrathoracic grass awns had no foreign body identified on initial ultrasonographic evaluation and were treated medically; 16 developed draining fistulas, and awns identified ultrasonographically at follow-up visits were subsequently removed from the sublumbar region (n = 10) or thoracic wall (6). The remaining 4 dogs had no grass awn visualized. Clinical signs resolved in all dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Transthoracic, transesophageal, and intraoperative ultrasonography were useful for localization and removal of migrating intrathoracic grass awns. Ultrasonography may be considered a valuable and readily available diagnostic tool for monitoring dogs with suspected migrating intrathoracic grass awns.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association