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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the effects of a 4-week group class specifically created for dogs ≥ 8 years old (senior dogs) on the development and progression of signs consistent with cognitive dysfunction syndrome (CDS).

ANIMALS

86 dogs with or without signs of CDS at the time of study enrollment.

PROCEDURES

Dog owners completed a proprietary CDS survey at baseline and then 3, 6, and 12 months after completion of the baseline survey. Twenty owners with their dogs attended 4 weekly 50-minute classes that were specifically developed for senior dogs, addressed common behavior problems for these dogs, and included training and enrichment activities. Survey results were compared between class and nonclass groups and within groups at 3, 6, and 12 months.

RESULTS

The association between age and CDS score was significant, such that older dogs had signs consistent with a higher degree of impairment. Cognitive dysfunction syndrome scores for dogs that attended the class did not significantly differ at 12 months, compared with scores at 3 months, whereas the CDS scores for dogs that did not attend the class were significantly increased at 12 months, compared with scores at 3 months.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Signs of CDS developed or worsened as dogs aged. Participation in the senior dog class mitigated the progression of signs of CDS and may improve a senior dog's quality of life.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the use of midazolam, ketamine, and xylazine for total IV anesthesia (TIVA) in horses.

Animals—6 healthy Thoroughbred mares.

Procedures—Horses were sedated with xylazine (1.0 mg/kg, IV). Anesthesia was induced with midazolam (0.1 mg/kg, IV) followed by ketamine (2.2 mg/kg, IV) and was maintained with an IV infusion of midazolam (0.002 mg/kg/min), ketamine (0.03 mg/kg/min), and xylazine (0.016 mg/kg/min). Horses underwent surgical manipulation and injection of the palmar digital nerves; duration of the infusion was 60 minutes. Additional ketamine (0.2 to 0.4 mg/kg, IV) was administered if a horse moved its head or limbs during procedures. Cardiopulmonary and arterial blood variables were measured prior to anesthesia; at 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 minutes during infusion; and 10 minutes after horses stood during recovery. Recovery quality was assessed by use of a numeric (1 to 10) scale with 1 as an optimal score.

Results—Anesthesia was produced for 70 minutes after induction; supplemental ketamine administration was required in 4 horses. Heart rate, respiratory rate, arterial blood pressures, and cardiac output remained similar to preanesthetic values throughout TIVA. Arterial partial pressure of oxygen and oxygen saturation of arterial hemoglobin were significantly decreased from preanesthetic values throughout anesthesia; oxygen delivery was significantly decreased at 10- to 30-minute time points. Each horse stood on its first attempt, and median recovery score was 2.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Midazolam, ketamine, and xylazine in combination produced TIVA in horses. Further studies to investigate various dosages for midazolam and ketamine or the substitution of other α2-adrenoceptor for xylazine are warranted.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare 4 analgesic protocols in dogs undergoing stifle joint surgery.

Design—Randomized, blinded, prospective clinical trial.

Animals—48 client-owned dogs that underwent stifle joint surgery.

Procedures—Dogs undergoing tibial plateau leveling osteotomy were randomly assigned to receive a constant rate infusion of a combination of morphine, lidocaine, and ketamine; a lumbosacral epidural with morphine and ropivacaine; both treatments (ie, constant rate infusion and lumbosacral epidural); or only IM premedication with morphine. Indices of cardiorespiratory function and isoflurane requirement were recorded at 5-minute intervals during anesthesia. A validated sedation scoring system and the modified Glasgow composite measure pain score were used to assess comfort and sedation after surgery and anesthesia once the swallowing reflex returned and a body temperature of ≥ 36.7°C (98.1°F) was attained. Pain and sedation scores were acquired at 60-minute intervals for 4 hours, then at 4-hour intervals for 24 hours. Dogs with a postoperative pain score > 5 of 24 were given morphine as rescue analgesia.

Results—No differences in heart rate, respiratory rate, systolic arterial blood pressure, end-tidal Pco2, end-tidal isoflurane concentration, and vaporizer setting were detected among groups. No differences in pain score, sedation score, rescue analgesia requirement, or time to first rescue analgesia after surgery were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Pain scores were similar among groups, and all 4 groups had similar rescue analgesia requirements and similar times to first administration of rescue analgesia. All 4 analgesic protocols provided acceptable analgesia for 24 hours after stifle joint surgery.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of IV administration of crystalloid (lactated Ringer's solution [LRS]) or colloid (hetastarch) fluid on isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.

Animals—6 healthy Beagles.

Procedures—On 3 occasions, each dog was anesthetized with propofol and isoflurane and instrumented with a thermodilution catheter (pulmonary artery). Following baseline assessments of hemodynamic variables, end-tidal isoflurane concentration was increased to achieve systolic arterial blood pressure (SABP) of 80 mm Hg. At that time (0 minutes), 1 of 3 IV treatments (no fluid, LRS [80 mL/kg/h], or hetastarch [80 mL/kg/h]) was initiated. Fluid administration continued until SABP was within 10% of baseline or to a maximum volume of 80 mL/kg (LRS) or 40 mL/kg (hetastarch). Hemodynamic variables were measured at intervals (0 through 120 minutes and additionally at 150 and 180 minutes in LRS- or hetastarch-treated dogs). Several clinicopathologic variables including total protein concentration, PCV, colloid osmotic pressure, and viscosity of blood were assessed at baseline and intervals thereafter (0 through 120 minutes).

Results—Administration of 80 mL of LRS/kg did not increase SABP in any dog, whereas administration of ≤ 40 mL of hetastarch/kg increased SABP in 4 of 6 dogs. Fluid administration increased cardiac index and decreased systemic vascular resistance. Compared with hetastarch treatment, administration of LRS decreased blood viscosity. Treatment with LRS decreased PCV and total protein concentration, whereas treatment with hetastarch increased colloid osmotic pressure.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that IV administration of hetastarch rather than LRS is recommended for the treatment of isoflurane-induced hypotension in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine after IV and SC administration and of sustained-release (SR) buprenorphine after SC administration to adult alpacas.

ANIMALS 6 alpacas.

PROCEDURES Buprenorphine (0.02 mg/kg, IV and SC) and SR buprenorphine (0.12 mg/kg, SC) were administered to each alpaca, with a 14-day washout period between administrations. Twenty-one venous blood samples were collected over 96 hours and used to determine plasma concentrations of buprenorphine. Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated by use of noncompartmental analysis. Pharmacodynamic parameters were assessed via sedation, heart and respiratory rates, and thermal and mechanical antinociception indices.

RESULTS Mean ± SD maximum concentration after IV and SC administration of buprenorphine were 11.60 ± 4.50 ng/mL and 1.95 ± 0.80 ng/mL, respectively. Mean clearance was 3.00 ± 0.33 L/h/kg, and steady-state volume of distribution after IV administration was 3.8 ± l.0 L/kg. Terminal elimination half-life was 1.0 ± 0.2 hours and 2.7 ± 2.8 hours after IV and SC administration, respectively. Mean residence time was 1.3 ± 0.3 hours and 3.6 ± 3.7 hours after IV and SC administration, respectively. Bioavailability was 64 ± 28%. Plasma concentrations after SC administration of SR buprenorphine were below the LLOQ in samples from 4 alpacas. There were no significant changes in pharmacodynamic parameters after buprenorphine administration. Alpacas exhibited mild behavioral changes after all treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Buprenorphine administration to healthy alpacas resulted in moderate bioavailability, rapid clearance, and a short half-life. Plasma concentrations were detectable in only 2 alpacas after SC administration of SR buprenorphine.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To analyze the effects of vertical force peak (VFP) of repition within trials and between trial sessions in horses with naturally occurring appendicular lameness.

ANIMALS 20 lame horses acclimated to trotting over a force plate.

PROCEDURES Kinetic gait data were collected by use of a force plate regarding affected and contralateral limbs of lame horses that completed 5 valid repetitions in each of 5 sessions performed at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 24 hours, constituting 1 trial/horse. Data were compared within and among repetitions and sessions, and factors influencing VFP values were identified.

RESULTS VFP values differed for lame limbs after 3 valid repetitions were performed within a session and when the interval between sessions was 3 hours. Direction of change reflected less lameness (greater VFP). Lamer horses (≥ grade 4/5) had this finding to a greater degree than did less lame horses. Results were similar for contralateral limbs regarding valid repetitions within a session; however, VFP decreased when the interval between sessions exceeded 6 hours. The coefficient of variation for VFP was ≤ 8% within sessions and ≤ 6% between sessions. The asymmetry index for VFP did not change throughout the study.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Lameness profiles obtained through kinetic gait analysis of horses with naturally occurring lameness were most accurate when valid repetitions were limited to 3 and the interval between sessions within a trial was > 3 hours. Findings suggested that natural lameness may be as suitable as experimentally induced lameness for lameness research involving horses.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether previous corrective upper airway surgery in brachycephalic dogs would decrease perianesthetic complications in subsequent anesthetic events.

ANIMALS

45 client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Brachycephalic dogs undergoing any combination of staphylectomy, nasal alaplasty, or laryngeal sacculectomy that were anesthetized at a later date for additional surgical procedures or imaging from August 2, 2007, to February 8, 2019, had their medical records reviewed during both anesthetic events for signalment, American Society of Anesthesiologists status, perianesthetic drug administration, anesthetic duration, presence and total time of positive-pressure ventilation, procedure invasiveness, and perianesthetic complications such as bradycardia, hypothermia, hypotension, cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, vomiting or regurgitation, dysphoria, respiratory distress, hypoxemia, reintubation, and prolonged periods of recovery.

RESULTS

The odds of having complications during the postanesthetic period following subsequent anesthetic events were decreased by 79% in dogs having previous surgical intervention to correct clinical signs of brachycephalic airway syndrome. Intra-anesthetic bradycardia increased the odds of developing a postanesthetic complication by 4.56 times. Every 15-minute increase in anesthetic duration increased the odds of having a postanesthetic complication by 12% and having an intra-anesthetic complication by 11%.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Previous corrective upper airway surgery decreased odds of postanesthetic complications in brachycephalic dogs that underwent subsequent anesthetic events. Findings in this study indicated that corrective upper airway surgery for brachycephalic dogs may reduce postanesthetic complications following subsequent anesthetic events, which may reduce perianesthetic morbidity in patients undergoing multiple surgical or diagnostic imaging procedures.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of midazolam after IV and IM administration in alpacas.

Animals—6 healthy alpacas.

Procedures—Midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) was administered IV or IM in a randomized crossover design. Twelve hours prior to administration, catheters were placed in 1 (IM trial) or both (IV trial) jugular veins for drug administration and blood sample collection for determination of serum midazolam concentrations. Blood samples were obtained at intervals up to 24 hours after IM and IV administration. Midazolam concentrations were determined by use of tandem liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry.

Results—Maximum concentrations after IV administration (median, 1,394 ng/mL [range, 1,150 to 1,503 ng/mL]) and IM administration (411 ng/mL [217 to 675 ng/mL]) were measured at 3 minutes and at 5 to 30 minutes, respectively. Distribution half-life was 18.7 minutes (13 to 47 minutes) after IV administration and 41 minutes (30 to 80 minutes) after IM administration. Elimination half-life was 98 minutes (67 to 373 minutes) and 234 minutes (103 to 320 minutes) after IV and IM administration, respectively. Total clearance after IV administration was 11.3 mL/min/kg (6.7 to 13.9 mL/min/kg), and steady-state volume of distribution was 525 mL/kg (446 to 798 mL/kg). Bioavailability of midazolam after IM administration was 92%. Peak onset of sedation occurred at 0.4 minutes (IV) and 15 minutes (IM). Sedation was significantly greater after IV administration.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Midazolam was well absorbed after IM administration, had a short duration of action, and induced moderate levels of sedation in alpacas.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research