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  • Author or Editor: Troy S. Ford x
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Summary

Communications between the femoropatellar, medial femorotibial, and lateral femorotibial joints were studied, using fresh equine cadaver specimens. A total of 90 specimens from 45 horses were used. Horses were randomly assigned to 3 groups with 15 horses/group. Each group was assigned an injection site (femoropatellar joint, medial femorotibial joint, or lateral femorotibial joint), and red latex was injected into the respective location of each joint in each group. Immediately after injection, the joints were flexed and extended 100 times. The stifles were frozen in slight flexion, then cut into 1-cm sagittal sections. The communications between the femoropatellar and medial and lateral femorotibial joints were determined.

None of the specimens in this study had communication between all 3 joint compartments. When the femoropatellar joint was injected, 18 of 30 joints (60%) communicated with the medial femorotibial joint, and 1 of 30 (3%) communicated with the lateral femorotibial joint. Injection of the medial femorotibial joint revealed 24 of 30 (80%) joints that communicated with the femoropatellar joint, and 1 of 30 (3%) that communicated with the lateral femorotibial joint. Injection of the lateral femorotibial joint resulted in communication with the femoropatellar joint in 1 of 30 (3%) joints. Communication did not exist between the medial and lateral femorotibial joints.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

Full-thickness, circular (4-cm diameter) cutaneous wounds were created on the metacarpi and metatarsi of 6 horses. Immediately after wounding, 1 wound on each horse received a meshed, split-thickness skin graft (0.64 mm) obtained from the ventrolateral aspect of the horse's thorax by use of a pneumatic dermatome, whereas a second wound received a meshed, full-thickness skin graft obtained from the pectoral area. In addition, sections of split-thickness and full-thickness grafts were refrigerated in a solution of McCoy's 5A medium, to which equine serum (10%) and gentamicin sulfate solution (16 mg/dl) were added. Ten days after wounding, 1 granulating wound on each horse was grafted with a stored, meshed, split-thickness graft, and 1 granulating wound on each horse was grafted with a stored, meshed, full-thickness graft.

Areas of wounds were calculated from photographs taken of wounds on days 1, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 after wounding. Time course of contraction was determined by use of a first-order mathematic model of changes in area through time.

Rate constants of contraction for fresh or granulating wounds receiving full-thickness grafts did not differ signficantly from those for fresh or granulating wounds receiving split-thickness grafts. Rate constants of contraction for grafted fresh wounds, however, were significantly less than those of grafted granulating wounds, regardless of whether a split-thickness or full-thickness graft was applied.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

The case records of 26 horses with ileocecal intussusception over a 7-year period were reviewed to determine clinical features of the disease and response to treatment. The median age of horses with ileocecal intussusception was 1 year and ranged from 2 weeks to 19 years. There was no apparent gender or breed predisposition to this disease.

An acute form of ileocecal intussusception was diagnosed in 19 horses with signs of moderate to severe abdominal pain of:$ 24 hours' duration, and a chronic form was diagnosed in 7 horses with signs of intermittent, mild to moderate abdominal pain of more than 3 days' duration. Horses with chronic ileocecal intussusception had a history of weight loss or failure to gain weight, slow growth, poor appetite, low-grade pyrexia, and postprandial signs of abdominal pain. At surgery, the involved segments of intestine (intussusceptum and intussuscipiens) in chronic cases were 2 to 10 cm long, and the ileum and much of the distal portion of the jejunum were flaccid, dilated, and thick walled. In the acute cases, the length of involved intestine ranged from 6 to 457 cm. Whereas only 1 of 7 chronic intussusceptions (14%) could be reduced, 9 of 19 (47%) acute intussusceptions were reducible.

Surgical treatment included resection and jejunocecostomy (6 horses), partial resection through a cecotomy and a side-to-side jejunocecostomy (2 horses), and a side-to-side ileocecostomy or jejunocecostomy without resection (12 horses, 7 of which had chronic intussusception). Six horses with acute intussusception were euthanatized before or during surgery. Four horses with acute intussusception died or were euthanatized between 2 and 9 months after surgery, 1 from unknown causes, 2 from impaction at the anastomosis, and 1 from small-intestinal strangulation. Two horses were lost to long-term follow-up. Horses with chronic intussusception survived, but some of these horses had a slow postoperative recovery.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association