Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Tracy L. Webb x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

A scoping review of published literature found 108 articles related to mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) use in cats. Twenty-four of the publications summarized the treatment of 192 cats with MSC products for 12 naturally occurring and induced diseases. These trials used a variety of cell sources, administration routes, delivery vehicles, and dosages. The majority of studies did not have a control group. The disease with the largest number of cats administered MSCs thus far is chronic kidney disease (n = 59 cats). The majority of cats had no adverse events associated with treatment, which supports continued interest in the potential use of MSC products to address unmet medical needs. Treatment outcomes of the 192 cats have ranged from no response to long-term cure, depending on the disease being treated and the particular study. Some of these early studies show promise and provide significant information to direct both the design and focus of larger clinical trials investigating the safety and efficacy of MSC treatment for veterinary and human applications.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Despite a pressing need for new therapies to address unmet veterinary medical need, no approved stem cell products are available for use in cats in the US. To evaluate the current state of mesenchymal stem or stromal cell (MSC) research in cats, a scoping review of published literature was performed, which identified 108 publications related to feline MSCs. Twenty-six of the articles described administration of MSC products to a total of 215 cats. Twelve of the studies included a control group. These experimental and clinical trials used 7 cell sources, 9 administration routes, 12 delivery vehicles, and a 300-fold range in dosages for initial studies in healthy cats and cats with 12 naturally occurring and induced diseases. The majority of studies administered 2 doses of allogeneic, adipose-derived MSC IV and monitored a median of 6.5 treated cats for a median of 90 days. The majority (150/215 [69.8%]) of cats had no reported adverse events associated with treatment. Although an increase in feline MSC publications in the past 10 years indicates progress, the wide variety and small number of studies using MSCs and MSC products in cats demonstrates that current evaluations are mostly still in the discovery phase, and several issues remain related to larger scale trials using MSC products in cats. The current available publications provide information to direct further clinical study development and informed owner consent for study enrollment.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

The world is losing wildlife species at an unprecedented rate. Habitat destruction, overexploitation, and pollution are the leading causes of biodiversity decline. As a threat multiplier, climate change exacerbates these processes as demonstrated by the death of several billion wild animals in the last few years from wildfires, floods, heatwaves, and other natural disasters. In the face of these challenges, veterinarians have unique and important skillsets to contribute to wildlife conservation and the preservation of biodiversity at many levels. Veterinarians can organize and train to mobilize wildlife extraction, rescue, and rehabilitation units during natural disasters as well as build relationships with rehabilitators to provide their services for general wildlife rehabilitation needs. They can work in transdisciplinary teams to provide veterinary expertise for ecosystem health and rewilding projects. They can become sustainability champions by providing pollinator and wildlife friendly habitats at their clinics and reducing clinic waste and energy consumption, and they can engage in science communication and advocacy. When provided with the necessary information, resources, and action items, veterinarians can increase their positive impact and personal well-being through purposeful, value-driven, community-building efforts to support wildlife conservation and biodiversity.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the effects of hemorrhagic shock and fresh whole blood resuscitation on the microcirculation and endothelial glycocalyx using sidestream dark field (SDF) imaging and plasma biomarkers.

ANIMALS

8 purpose-bred dogs.

METHODS

Pressure-targeted hemorrhagic shock was induced in anesthetized dogs. SDF measurement of perfused boundary region and microcirculatory variables (RBC flow, total vessel density, and relative and absolute capillary blood volume), biomarker measurement (heparan sulfate, hyaluronan, VE-cadherin, and syndecan-1), mean arterial blood pressure, and cardiac output measurement were performed before anesthesia (TP0), after induction (TP1), after hemorrhagic shock (TP2), and after 50% retransfusion (TP3) and 100% retransfusion (TP4).

RESULTS

At TP1, TP2, TP3, and TP4, mean arterial blood pressure was 74.25 ± 7.17 mm Hg, 49.50 ± 13.74 mm Hg, 63.50 ± 13.29 mm Hg, and 71.38 ± 8.77 mm Hg, and cardiac output was 2.57 ± 1.01 L/min, 0.8 ± 0.36 L/min, 1.81 ± 0.57 L/min, and 2.93 ± 1.22 L/min, respectively. Heparan sulfate, hyaluronan, syndecan-1, and VE-cadherin ranges were 24.80 to 77.72 ng/mL, 5.77 to 105.06 ng/mL, below detection to 1,545.69 pg/mL, and 0 to 2.52 ng/mL, respectively. Perfused boundary region, RBC flow, total vessel density, and relative and absolute capillary blood volume ranges were 1.75 to 2.68 µm, 89.6 to 584.5 µm/s, 51.7 to 1,914.3 mm/m2, 0.94 to 1.53 103 μm3, and 1.50 to 94.30 103 μm3, respectively. Heparan sulfate decreased significantly over time (P = .016). No significant differences were found for microcirculatory variables, perfused boundary regions, or other biomarkers.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This was the first study to assess microvascular dysfunction and endothelial shedding in a canine hemorrhagic shock model using SDF microscopy (Glycocheck) and plasma biomarkers. Further studies are needed to determine clinical relevance.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the prevalence and seropositivity of SARS-CoV-2 in companion and exotic animals in a veterinary healthcare system.

SAMPLE

A total of 341 animals were sampled by a combination of oral and nasal swabs. Serum from whole blood was collected from a subset of animals (86 canines, 25 felines, and 6 exotic animals).

METHODS

After informed owner consent, convenience samples from client-owned animals and the pets of students and staff members associated with Colorado State University’s Veterinary Health System were collected between May 2021 and September 2022. Study samples were collected by trained veterinarians, Veterinary Health System staff, and veterinary students.

RESULTS

SARS-CoV-2 RNA was detected by reverse transcription PCR in 1.6% (95% CI, 0.5% to 4.6%) of domestic canines and 1.1% (95% CI, 0.2% to 6.1%) of domestic felines. No RNA was detected in any of the exotic animal species tested (n = 66). Plaque reduction neutralization tests indicated that 12.8% (95% CI, 7.3% to 21.5%) of canines and 12.0% (95% CI, 4.2% to 30.0%) of felines had neutralizing antibodies against SARS-CoV-2.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

This study provides insight regarding SARS-CoV-2 spillover in domestic companion and exotic animals and contributes to our understanding of transmission risk in the veterinary setting.

Open access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association