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Abstract

Objective—To determine the efficacy of florfenicol for treatment of calves with naturally occurring infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK).

Design—Randomized controlled field trial.

Animals—63 beef calves and 80 dairy calves between 4 and 12 months of age.

Procedure—Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 treatment groups. Calves in the SC treatment group received a single dose of florfenicol (40 mg/kg [18.2 mg/lb] of body weight), SC, on day 0. Calves in the IM treatment group received florfenicol (20 mg/kg [9.1 mg/lb]), IM, on days 0 and 2. Calves in the control group received injections of saline solution (0.9% NaCl), IM, on days 0 and 2. Calves were reevaluated every other day for 20 days after treatment.

Results—Corneal ulcers healed by day 20 in 48 of 49 (98%) calves treated with florfenicol IM, 39 of 42 (93%) calves treated with florfenicol SC, and 33 of 52 (63%) control calves.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Florfenicol administered SC (1 dose) or IM (2 doses 48 hours apart) was effective for treatment of calves with naturally occurring IBK. ( J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;216: 62–64)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine whether a two-month or longer period without official high-speed workouts (lay-up) is associated with humeral or pelvic fracture in Thoroughbred racehorses.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

Thoroughbred racehorses in California that were euthanatized because of a complete humeral or pelvic fracture.

Procedure

Age, sex, activity, number of lay-ups, number of days from a race or official timed workout to fracture, number of days from end of last lay-up to fracture, mean duration of lay-ups, and total number of days in race training were compared between horses with humeral fractures and horses with pelvic fractures. A case-crossover study was used to estimate relative risk for fracture of the humerus or pelvis occurring within hazard periods of 10 and 21 days following lay-up, compared with periods following more regular participation in official racing or timed workout events.

Results

Horses with pelvic fractures were more often female, older, and had 0 or ≥ 2 lay-ups. Horses with humeral fractures were typically 3-year-old males that had 1 lay-up. Horses with pelvic fractures had more total days in race training, fewer days from last exercise event to fracture, and a greater number of days from end of last lay-up to fracture than horses with humeral fractures. Return from lay-up was strongly associated with risk for humeral fracture during hazard periods of 10 and 21 days (relative risk = 71 and 45, respectively).

Clinical Implications

Risk of humeral fracture may be reduced if horses are cautiously reintroduced into race training after lay-up. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998;212: 1582–1587)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association