Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for

  • Author or Editor: Todd M. Archer x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Case Description—A 7-year-old neutered male Saint Bernard was evaluated because of a 6-month history of coughing, gagging, change in phonation, excessive panting, and chronic intermittent vomiting and diarrhea.

Clinical Findings—Physical examination revealed no remarkable findings other than panting. Total thyroxine concentration and results of a CBC, serum biochemistry analysis, urinalysis, and thoracic radiography were within reference limits. A laryngeal examination revealed edema, erythema, and ulceration of the larynx and pharynx, with normal laryngeal movement. Results of bronchoscopy and cytologic examination of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were diagnostic only for distal tracheitis. Esophagoscopy and an esophagography revealed esophagitis consistent with gastroesophageal reflux. Gastroduodenoscopy and histologic examination of biopsy specimens revealed Helicobacter colonization and lymphocytic or plasmacytic enteritis.

Treatment and Outcome—Following treatment for gastroesophageal reflux and suspected Helicobacter infection with combination antacid and antimicrobial treatment, the dog's respiratory signs resolved but vomiting continued. Gastroduodenoscopy revealed complete resolution of the previous laryngitis, pharyngitis, and esophagitis. Treatment for the lymphocytic or plasmacytic enteritis was initiated with prednisone (1 mg/kg [0.45 mg/lb], PO, q 12 h) and a novel protein diet. The previous treatment was also continued. Complete resolution of clinical signs was maintained 4 months after initiation of appropriate treatment.

Clinical Relevance—Laryngeal dysfunction induced by gastroesophageal reflux as occurred in the patient described in this report is a previously undocumented association in the veterinary literature. This association could be a potential consideration in dogs with concurrent respiratory and gastrointestinal signs. The present report may provide a basis for further studies investigating this association.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate coagulation factors in units of leukoreduced (LR) and nonleukoreduced (non-LR) canine fresh-frozen plasma (cFFP).

ANIMALS

8 healthy research dogs.

PROCEDURES

In a crossover study, dogs were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups from which blood was collected and either did or did not undergo leukoreduction. After a recovery period of ≥ 28 days, the dogs were switched between protocols. After each collection, blood samples were centrifuged, and cFFP was stored frozen for later comparative analysis of coagulation factors, antithrombin, and protein C activities (reported as comparative percentages of the corresponding activities determined in a canine pooled plasma standard); prothrombin and activated partial thromboplastin times; and fibrinogen concentration.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences detected between results for LR cFFP, compared with those for non-LR cFFP.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Although there was variation among residual activities of coagulation factors in LR and non-LR cFFP, the variations and differences were considered unlikely to impact the efficacy of LR cFFP transfused for coagulation factor replacement in dogs. However, owing to the small sample size and high variability of results in the present study, additional research with a larger sample size is required for definitive conclusions on the effects of leukoreduction on coagulation factors in cFFP and to develop treatment guidelines for LR cFFP use in dogs with congenital and acquired coagulopathies.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate eicosanoid concentrations in freshly prepared canine packed RBCs (PRBCs) and to assess changes in eicosanoid concentrations in PRBC units over time during storage and under transfusion conditions.

DESIGN Prospective study.

SAMPLE 25 plasma samples from 14 healthy Greyhounds.

PROCEDURES Plasma samples were obtained during PRBC preparation (donation samples), and the PRBC units were then stored at 4°C until used for transfusion (≤ 21 days later; n = 17) or mock transfusion if expired (22 to 24 days later; 8). Immediately prior to use, 100 mL of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution was added to each unit and a pretransfusion sample was collected. A posttransfusion sample was collected after transfusion or mock transfusion. Concentrations of arachidonic acid, prostaglandin (PG) F, PGE2, PGD2, thromboxane B2, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 were measured by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry and analyzed statistically.

RESULTS Median arachidonic acid concentration was significantly decreased in posttransfusion samples, compared with the concentration in donation samples. Median PGF, 6-keto-PGF, and leukotriene B4 concentrations were significantly increased in pretransfusion samples, compared with those in donation samples. Median PGF, thromboxane B2, and 6-keto-PGF concentrations were significantly increased in posttransfusion samples, compared with those in pretransfusion samples. Duration of PRBC storage had significant associations with pretransfusion and posttransfusion arachidonic acid and thromboxane B2 concentrations.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrations of several proinflammatory eicosanoids increased in PRBC units during storage, transfusion, or both. Accumulation of these products could potentially contribute to adverse transfusion reactions, and investigation of the potential association between eicosanoid concentrations in PRBCs and the incidence of transfusion reactions in dogs is warranted.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effects of leukoreduction on N-methylhistamine (NMH; a stable histamine metabolite) concentration in units of canine whole blood during storage and incubation at room temperature (approx 22 °C) to simulate temperature conditions during transfusion.

ANIMALS

8 healthy adult Walker Hounds.

PROCEDURES

A standard unit of blood (450 mL) was obtained from each dog twice, with at least 28 days between donations. Blood units collected from 4 dogs during the first donation underwent leukoreduction, whereas the blood units collected from the other 4 dogs did not undergo leukoreduction, prior to storage at 4 °C. The alternate treatment was applied to blood units collected during the second donation. A sample from each unit was obtained for determination of plasma NMH concentration the day of donation (before and after leukoreduction when applicable) and before and after incubation at room temperature for 5 hours on days 14 and 28 of storage.

RESULTS

Units that underwent leukoreduction had substantially lower leukocyte and platelet counts than nonleukoreduced units. Plasma NMH concentration increased immediately after leukoreduction but did not change significantly during the subsequent 28 days of storage, nor did it differ between units that did and did not undergo leukoreduction.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Leukoreduction and simulated transfusion temperature did not affect the histamine load in units of canine whole blood during the first 28 days of storage. Further research is necessary to determine whether histamine contributes to the development and severity of blood transfusion reactions in dogs.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether passage of whole blood through a microaggregate filter by use of a syringe pump would damage canine erythrocytes.

SAMPLE

Blood samples obtained from 8 healthy client-owned dogs.

PROCEDURES

Whole blood was passed through a standard microaggregate filter by use of a syringe pump at 3 standard administration rates (12.5, 25, and 50 mL/h). Prefilter and postfilter blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of a simulated transfusion. Variables measured at each time point included erythrocyte osmotic fragility, mean corpuscular fragility, RBC count, hemoglobin concentration, RBC distribution width, and RBC morphology. In-line pressure when blood passed through the microaggregate filter was measured continuously throughout the simulated transfusion. After the simulated transfusion was completed, filters were visually analyzed by use of scanning electron microscopy.

RESULTS

Regardless of administration rate, there was no significant difference in mean corpuscular fragility, RBC count, hemoglobin concentration, or RBC distribution width between prefilter and postfilter samples. Additionally, there were no differences in in-line pressure during the simulated transfusion among administration rates. Echinocytes were the erythrocyte morphological abnormality most commonly observed at the end of the transfusion at administration rates of 12.5 and 25 mL/h.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that regardless of the administration rate, the microaggregate filter did not alter fragility of canine RBCs, but may have altered the morphology. It appeared that the microaggregate filter would not contribute to substantial RBC damage for transfusions performed with a syringe pump.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether a maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach, applied before rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy of dogs, would decrease procedural nociception, minimize cardiorespiratory anesthetic effects, and improve recovery quality.

ANIMALS 8 healthy adult hound-type dogs

PROCEDURES In a crossover study, dogs received 0.5% bupivacaine (0.1 mL/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline (0.9% NaCl) solution as a maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach. A 5-cm, 20-gauge over-the-needle catheter was placed retrograde within each infraorbital canal, and bupivacaine or saline solution was administered into each pterygopalatine region. Rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy were performed. Variables monitored included heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure (SAP), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), diastolic arterial blood pressure (DAP), plasma cortisol and norepinephrine concentrations, purposeful movement, and pain scores. After a 14-day washout period, the other treatment was administered on the contralateral side, and rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy were repeated.

RESULTS SAP, MAP, and DAP were significantly higher for the saline solution treatment than for the bupivacaine treatment, irrespective of the time point. Plasma cortisol concentrations after saline solution treatment were significantly higher 5 minutes after nasal biopsy than at biopsy. Heart rate, norepinephrine concentration, purposeful movement, and pain score were not significantly different between treatments.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Maxillary nerve block via a modified infraorbital approach prior to rhinoscopy and nasal biopsy reduced procedural nociception as determined on the basis of blood pressures and plasma cortisol concentrations during anesthesia. These findings warrant further evaluation in dogs with nasal disease.

Restricted access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research