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Objective

To determine whether combined parenteral and oral administration of oxytetracycline would ameliorate a herd outbreak of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) and to compare efficacy of this regimen with that of subconjunctival administration of procaine penicillin G.

Design

Randomized field trial.

Animals

119 Hereford calves in a herd undergoing a naturally occurring outbreak of IBK.

Procedure

Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of the following 3 groups: oxytetracycline treatment, procaine penicillin G treatment, and control. After initial treatment, calves were examined 3 times/wk for 7 weeks. The surface area of all corneal ulcers was measured during each examination. Ocular secretions were collected from all calves at least weekly and were tested for Moraxella bovis.

Results

Calves treated with oxytetracycline had a lower prevalence of IBK than did calves treated with procaine penicillin G or control calves and required fewer additional treatments than did calves treated with procaine penicillin G. Mean time for healing of corneal ulcers was significantly less for calves that received oxytetracycline or procaine penicillin G than for control calves. Calves treated with oxytetracycline developed fewer corneal ulcers and fewer recurrent ulcers than did calves in the other groups. Moraxella bovis was isolated less often from ocular secretions collected from calves in the oxytetracycline group than from calves in the other groups.

Clinical Implications

Combined parenteral and oral administration of oxytetracycline appears to be an effective method of reducing severity of a herd outbreak of IBK and may be superior to treatment of affected animals with procaine penicillin G. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1998; 212:560-563)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective

To determine long-term prognosis for horses with laminitis treated by deep digital flexor (DDF) tenotomy and to identify factors affecting success of the surgical procedure.

Design

Retrospective study.

Animals

35 horses with laminitis treated by DDF tenotomy between 1988 and 1997.

Procedure

Information was obtained from individual medical records and follow-up telephone interviews with owners and referring veterinarians. Cumulative proportions of horses that survived 6 months and 2 years after tenotomy were determined. Effect of Obel grade of lameness on 6-month and 2-year survival and effect of distal phalangeal rotation on survival and future performance were evaluated by χ 2 analysis. Body weights of horses that survived ≥ 2 years were compared with those of horses that survived < 2 years by ANOVA.

Results

27 of the 35 (77%) horses survived ≥ 6 months, and 19 of 32 (59%) survived > 2 years. Obel grade of lameness and body weight at time of surgery had no effect on 6-month or 2-year survival. Degree of distal phalangeal rotation had no effect on 2-year survival or the ability of horses to be used for light riding. Twenty-two of the 30 (73%) owners interviewed indicated they would have the procedure repeated on their horses given similar circumstances.

Clinical Implications

DDF tenotomy is a viable alternative for horses with laminitis refractory to conventional medical treatment. In some instances, the procedure may be effective in returning horses to light athletic use. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1999;214:517–519).

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association