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  • Author or Editor: Timothy E. Kirby x
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Abstract

Objective—To describe neuroendocrine responses that develop in dogs subjected to prolonged periods of ventricular pacing.

Animals—14 adult male hound-type dogs.

Procedure—Samples were obtained and neuroendocrine responses measured before (baseline) and after 3 periods of ventricular pacing. A pacemaker was used to induce heart rates of 180, 200, and 220 beats/min (BPM). Each heart rate was maintained for 3 weeks before increasing to the next rate. Atrial natriuretic peptide, antidiuretic hormone, aldosterone, norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine concentrations and plasma renin activity were measured. Severity of left ventricular compromise was estimated.

Results—Shortening fraction decreased significantly with increasing heart rates (mean ± SE, 35.5 ± 1.4, 25.0 ± 1.4, 19.5 ± 1.9, and 12.2 ± 2.3 for baseline, 180 BPM, 200 BPM, and 220 BPM, respectively). Atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations increased significantly at 180 BPM (44.1 ± 3.0 pg/mL) and 200 BPM (54.8 ± 5.5 pg/mL), compared with baseline concentration (36.8 ± 2.6 pg/mL). Dopamine concentration increased significantly at 200 BPM (70.4 ± 10.4 pg/mL), compared with baseline concentration (44.2 ± 7.3 pg/mL). Norepinephrine concentrations increased significantly from baseline concentration (451 ± 46.2 pg/mL) to 678 ± 69.8, 856 ± 99.6, and 1,003 ± 267.6 pg/mL at 180, 200, and 220 BPM, respectively.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs subjected to ventricular pacing for 9 weeks developed neuroendocrine responses similar to those that develop in humans with more chronic heart failure and, except for epinephrine concentrations, similar to those for dogs subjected to ventricular pacing for < 6 weeks. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1413–1417)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research