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  • Author or Editor: Thomas P. Schaer x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the analgesic properties of transdermally administered fentanyl and IM administered buprenorphine in sheep undergoing unilateral tibial osteotomy.

Animals—20 mature sheep.

Procedures—Fentanyl patches (n = 15 sheep) or placebo patches (5 sheep) were applied 12 hours before sheep underwent general anesthesia and a unilateral tibial osteotomy. Buprenorphine was administered to the placebo group every 6 hours commencing at time of induction. Signs of pain were assessed every 12 hours after surgery by 2 independent observers unaware of treatment groups.

Results—There were no differences in preoperative and intraoperative physiologic data between the 2 groups. Sheep treated with fentanyl required less preoperative administration of diazepam for sedation and had significantly lower postoperative pain scores, compared with those treated with buprenorphine. No complications associated with the antebrachium at the site of patch application were detected.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Under the conditions of this study, transdermally administered fentanyl was a superior option to IM administered buprenorphine for alleviation of postoperative orthopedic pain in sheep. This information can be used to assist clinicians in the development of a rational analgesic regimen for research and clinical patients.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To investigate the pharmacokinetics of fentanyl administered transdermally and IV in sheep.

Animals—21 adult female sheep.

Procedures—Fentanyl was administered IV to 6 healthy sheep. Transdermal fentanyl patches (TFPs) were applied to 15 sheep 12 hours prior to general anesthesia and surgery. Seria blood samples were collected for 18 hours after IV injection and 84 hours after TFP application. Fentanyl concentrations were quantified via liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, and pharmacokinetic values were estimated.

Results—All sheep completed the study without complications. Following a dose of 2.5g/kg administered IV, the half-life was 3.08 hours (range, 2.20 to 3.36 hours), volume of distribution at steady state was 8.86 L/kg (range, 5.55 to 15.04 L/kg), and systemic clearance was 3.62 L/kg/h (range, 2.51 to 5.39 L/kg/h). The TFPs were applied at a mean dose of 2.05 g/kg/h. Time to maximum plasma concentration and maximal concentration were 12 hours (range, 4 to 24 hours) and 1.30 ng/mL (range, 0.62 to 2.73 ng/mL), respectively. Fentanyl concentrations were maintained at > 0.5 ng/mL for 40 hours after TFP application.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IV administration of fentanyl resulted in a short half-life. Application of a TFP resulted in stable blood fentanyl concentrations in sheep. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1127—1132)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate effects of apheresis on mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and compare those MSCs with MSCs obtained from adipose tissue or bone marrow (BM).

Sample Population—Samples obtained from 6 adult horses.

Procedures—Samples of blood from a peripheral vein, adipose tissue, and BM aspirate were obtained from each horse. Samples were processed via apheresis of blood and techniques reported elsewhere for adipose tissue and BM. Cultures were maintained until adherence and subsequently were subjected to differentiation protocols to evaluate adipogenic, osteoblastogenic, and chondrogenic potential.

Results—Apheresis product had a significantly higher mononuclear percentage, higher platelet count, and lower RBC count, compared with values for peripheral blood. No cell adherence to the tissue culture plates was detected for the apheresis product. Adherence was detected for 6 of 6 adipose-derived and 4 of 6 BM-derived samples. Variations in efficiency were detected for differentiation of adipose- and BM-derived cells into adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Apheresis was able to concentrate mononuclear cells and reduce RBC contamination. However, the apheresis product was unable to adhere to the tissue culture plates. In matched horses, adipose- and BM-derived MSCs were capable of producing lipids, glycosaminoglycan, and mineral. The BM was vastly superior to adipose tissue as a source of MSCs with osteoblastogenic potential in matched horses. Additional studies will be necessary to optimize apheresis techniques for horses before peripheral blood can be considered a suitable source for multipotential cells for use in cell-based treatments.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—5 dogs, 1 goat, and 1 horse underwent percutaneous endovascular retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies between 2002 and 2007.

Clinical Findings—Foreign bodies were IV catheters in 4 dogs, the horse, and the goat and a piece of a balloon valvuloplasty catheter in 1 dog. Location of the foreign bodies included the main pulmonary artery (1 dog), a branch of a pulmonary artery (4 dogs), the right ventricle (the goat), and a jugular vein (the horse).

Treatment and Outcome—The procedure of percutaneous endovascular retrieval of the foreign body was easy to perform in all instances. One dog was euthanized 41 days after retrieval because of worsening of another disease process, and 1 dog had abnormal neurologic signs secondary to a brain mass. All other animals were clinically normal during the follow-up period (follow-up duration, 3 to 57 months). None of the animals developed long-term complications secondary to the foreign body retrieval procedure.

Clinical Relevance—Intravascular foreign bodies that result from catheters or devices used during minimally invasive techniques are rare but may cause substantial morbidity. Percutaneous endovascular retrieval of intravascular foreign bodies was easily and safely performed in the 7 animals reported here. Use of percutaneous endovascular retrieval techniques should be considered for treatment of animals with intravascular foreign bodies because morbidity can be substantially decreased; however, proper selection of patients for the procedure is necessary.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association