Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Thomas K. Graves x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate clinical and laboratory findings, treatment, and clinical outcome in cats with blastomycosis.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—8 cats with naturally occurring blastomycosis.

Procedures—Medical records of the University of Illinois Veterinary Teaching Hospital were searched for cases of blastomycosis in cats diagnosed via cytologic or histopathologic findings. Clinical and laboratory findings, treatment, and clinical outcome were determined. Radiographs were reviewed for the 8 cases.

Results—All cats were systemically ill. Respiratory tract signs and dermal lesions were most commonly observed. All cats had radiographic evidence of respiratory tract disease. Seven of the 8 cats had ill-defined soft-tissue opacities (nodules or masses) or alveolar consolidation of the lungs. Antemortem diagnosis was achieved cytologically in 6 of the 8 cats, and 3 were successfully treated and survived.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In contrast to previous reports, diagnosis was achieved antemortem in most of the cats (all by cytologic identification of the organism). Clinical signs, laboratory findings, and outcome were similar to previous descriptions of this rare disease in cats.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the ratio of collagen type III to collagen type I in the periurethral tissues of sexually intact and neutered female dogs.

Animals—8 neutered and 34 sexually intact female dogs.

Procedures—Tissues were obtained from female dogs euthanized for non–urinary tract–related reasons. Indirect immunofluorescent antibody detection of type I and collagen type III was performed by use of confocal microscopy on 2 periurethral samples from each dog, and the ratios of collagen type III to type I area fraction and total area were determined.

Results—No significant differences were detected in the collagen ratios of periurethral tissues between sexually intact and neutered female dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In contrast to differences in periurethral collagen content found between pre- and postmenopausal women, such differences may not occur in dogs. This implies that changes in pelvic organ support structures may not play an important role in urinary incontinence in neutered female dogs. Further evaluation is needed to determine the role of age on collagen and pelvic organ support structures in the pathogenesis of canine urinary incontinence.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

We measured glomerular filtration rate (gfr) estimated by plasma disappearance of 99mTc-labeled diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid, serum concentrations of thyroxine (T4), creatinine, and urea nitrogen, and urine specific gravity in 13 cats with naturally acquired hyperthyroidism before and 30 days after treatment by bilateral thyroidectomy, and in a group of 11 control cats. Mean (±sd) serum T4 concentration decreased from a pretreatment value of 120.46 (± 39.21) nmol/L to a posttreatment value of 12.15 (± 6.26) nmol/L (P < 0.0001; reference range, 10 to 48 nmol/L). Treatment of hyperthyroidism resulted in a decrease in mean (± sd) glomerular filtration rate, from 2.51 (± 0.69) ml/kg of body weight/min to a posttreatment value of 1.40 (± 0.41) ml/kg/min (P < 0.0001). Mean serum creatinine concentration increased from 1.26 (± 0.34) mg/dl to 2.05 (± 0.60) mg/dl (P < 0.01). Mean serum urea nitrogen concentration increased from 26.62 (± 6.83) mg/dl to a mean postthyroidectomy concentration of 34.92 (± 8.95) mg/dl (P < 0.01). All changes were significant. Two cats developed overt renal azotemia after treatment of hyperthyroidism. Our results provide further evidence that treatment of hyperthyroidism can result in impaired renal function. In addition, our results suggest that, in some instances, thyrotoxicosis might mask underlying chronic renal insufficiency.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research