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  • Author or Editor: Thomas E. Rogers x
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Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the effectiveness of a novel fluorescence tracer agent, MB-102, for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

ANIMALS

10 ophthalmologically normal dogs (2 to 4 years old) and 10 dogs with retinal degeneration or primary open-angle glaucoma (< 6 years old).

PROCEDURES

While anesthetized, all dogs received sodium fluorescein (20 mg/kg, IV) or MB-102 (20 or 40 mg/kg, IV) first and then the other dye in a second treatment session 2 days later in a randomized crossover design. Anterior fluorescence angiography was performed on one eye and posterior fluorescence angiography on the other. Imaging was performed with a full-spectrum camera and camera adaptor system. Filter sets that were tailored to match the excitation and emission characteristics of each angiographic fluorescent agent were used.

RESULTS

All phases and phase intervals during anterior and posterior segment angiography were identified, regardless of the dye used. However, agent fluorescence and visualization of the iridal blood vessels were hindered in some dogs, irrespective of agent, owing to the degree of iridal pigmentation present. No significant difference was noted between the 2 dyes in any phase or phase interval, and slight improvement in image contrast was observed with MB-102 during the venous phases owing to a reduction of vessel wall staining in both normal and diseased eyes.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Results suggested that MB-102 would be useful for conducting ocular angiography in dogs.

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To quantify effects of certified health programs on the sale price of beef calves sold through a livestock videotape auction service.

Design—Longitudinal study.

Sample Population—26,502 lots representing 3,205,192 beef calves sold through a livestock videotape auction service between 1995 and 2005.

Procedures—Data describing each lot of beef calves that were marketed from 1995 through 2005 by a livestock videotape auction service were obtained from sale catalogues. For each year of the study, multiple regression analysis was used to quantify the effect of certified health programs on sale price.

Results—For each year of the study, beef calves that qualified for the 2 most intensive certified health programs sold for significantly higher prices, compared with prices for similar calves that were not in a certified health program, had not been vaccinated against respiratory tract viruses, and were not weaned before delivery. Price premiums for calves in the most intensive certified health program ranged from $2.47/100 lb (hundredweight [cwt]; 1 cwt equals 45.45 kg) in 1995 to $7.91/cwt in 2004. Price premiums paid for calves qualifying for the next most intensive certified health program ranged from $0.99/cwt in 1996 to $3.47/cwt in 2004. The percentage of the total number of lots in the 2 most intensive certified health programs increased over time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Findings from this study indicated that implementation of the 2 most intensive certified health programs consistently increased the price of beef calves, and these price premiums increased over time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association