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  • Author or Editor: Terrell G. Heaton-Jones x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate renal effects of carprofen in healthy dogs following general anesthesia.

Design—Randomized clinical trial.

Animals—10 English hound dogs (6 females and 4 males).

Procedure—Dogs were randomly assigned to control (n = 5) or carprofen (5) groups. Anesthesia was induced with propofol (6 to 8 mg/kg [2.7 to 3.6 mg/lb] of body weight, IV) and maintained with isoflurane (end-tidal concentration, 2.0%). Each dog underwent two 60-minute anesthetic episodes with 1 week between episodes, and mean arterial blood pressure was maintained between 60 and 90 mm Hg during each episode. Dogs in the carprofen group received carprofen (2.2 mg/kg [1 mg/lb], PO) at 9:00 AM and 6:00 PM the day before and at 7:00 AM the day of the second anesthetic episode. Glomerular filtration rates (GFR) were determined during each anesthetic episode by use of renal scintigraphy. Serum creatinine and BUN concentrations and the urine γ-glutamyltransferase-to-creatinine concentration (urine GGT: creatinine) ratio were determined daily for 2 days before and 5 days after general anesthesia.

Results—Significant differences were not detected in BUN and serum creatinine concentrations, urine GGT:creatinine ratio, and GFR either between or within treatment groups over time.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Carprofen did not significantly alter renal function in healthy dogs anesthetized with propofol and isoflurane. These results suggest that carprofen may be safe to use for preemptive perioperative analgesia, provided that normal cardiorespiratory function is maintained. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2000;217:346–349)

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

Sedative, cardiorespiratory, and analgesic effects of intramuscular administration of medetomidine (40 µg/kg of body weight)-glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg) and medetomidine (10 µg/kg)-butorphanol (0.2 mg/kg)-glycopyrrolate (0.01 mg/kg) combinations were compared. Additional evaluations were done on reversal of medetomidine, using atipamezole (200 µ g/kg, IV), after 90 minutes of medetomidine-induced sedation.

Design

Crossover study, with each dog receiving each drug combination at 1-week intervals.

Animals

Six 2-year-old English hound-type dogs.

Procedure

Arterial blood pressure, ECG, respiratory rate, tidal volume, minute volume, arterial blood gas tensions, and serum biochemical variables were measured before, during, and after sedation. Analgesia was evaluated by needle prick on the skin and tail clamp.

Results

Heart rate decreased significantly from 100 beats/mm to <40 beats/min within 3 minutes of injection of medetomidine and medetomidine. and butorphanol (MB). Mean arterial blood pressure in both groups were maintained above 100 mm of Hg throughout the recording period. There was no significant difference between medetomidine and MB in respiratory rate, tidal volume, and minute ventilation. Hypoxemia (PaO2 < 60 mm of Hg) was observed at 10 and 20 minutes in 2 dogs given MB. Atipamezole administration in the dogs given medetomidine significantly increased PaO2 and returned the values to baseline. Needle prick analgesia duration was longer in the medetomidine (80 ± 7.7 minutes) than MB (56.0 ± 19.2 minutes) group. Tail pinch analgesia was variable in both groups. Duration of lateral recumbency was longer after medetomidine (90 ± 0 minutes) than MB (73.5 ± 19.0 minutes).

Conclusion

Medetomidine and MB were effective combinations for mildly invasive procedures.

Clinical Relevance

MB induced a shorter period of analgesia and recumbency than did medetomidine. (Am J Vet Res 1996;57:535–540)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective

To determine the effects of 3 sedative protocols (butorphanol and diazepam [BD] IV; acepromazine and butorphanol [AB] IV; diazepam and ketamine [DK] IV) on glomerular filtration rate (GFR) as measured by 99mTc DTPA nuclear scintigraphy and to compare them with GFR measured without sedation. Cardiovascular, respiratory, and sedative effects of each protocol also were measured.

Animals

12 adult male Walker Hounds.

Procedure

Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures and heart and respiratory rates were measured before, during, and after scintigraphic measurement of GFR.

Results

Difference in GFR was not significant between any of the sedative regimens and the control. The DK protocol caused significant increases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure; compared with the AB and BD protocols, it caused significant increases in heart rate versus all protocols, and was associated with the lowest mean GFR (2.80 ml/min/kg of body weight). The AB protocol caused significant decreases in systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, compared with DK and the nonsedation protocols. Mean GFR for the BD protocol was 2.94 ml/min/kg, and was 3.13 ml/min/kg for the AB and the nonsedation protocols. The AB protocol provided the best sedation with minimal additional restraint required. The BD and nonsedation protocols often were associated with substantial dog movement. The DK protocol induced inadequate duration of immobilization (< 10 minutes) in some dogs and excitement in others.

Conclusion

GFR measurements obtained with any of the sedative protocols were not significantly different, compared with measurements in awake dogs. The AB protocol provides the best sedative effects and was associated with GFR values identical to those in awake dogs. Systemic hypotension caused by acepromazine did not decrease GFR in clinically normal dogs. (Am J Vet Res 1997;58:446–450)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research