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Abstract

Case Description—3 adult Quarter Horses were evaluated for acute, progressive neurologic signs 18 hours after oral administration of 1 dose of 1.87% ivermectin paste.

Clinical Findings—Clinical signs included depression, forelimb and hind limb ataxia, drooping of the superior and inferior lips, and muscle fasciculations. Bilateral mydriasis, decreased pupillary light reflexes, and absent menace reflexes were evident. Clinical signs progressed in severity for 36 hours after administration of the ivermectin.

Treatment and Outcome—All horses were treated supportively with IV administration of fluids and anti-inflammatory medications. Two horses survived with no apparent long-term sequelae. One horse was euthanized, and a high concentration of ivermectin was detected in its brain tissue at postmortem examination. Analysis of the ivermectin concentration in the paste product revealed that the concentration was approximately that indicated on the packaging.

Clinical Relevance—Ivermectin toxicosis is an uncommonly reported condition in equids that should be considered when acute neurologic impairment develops after ivermectin administration. Recovery is possible with supportive care and time.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To describe the chief complaints by owners and the types and prevalences of musculoskeletal problems associated with lameness or poor performance in cutting horses.

DESIGN Retrospective case series.

ANIMALS 200 client-owned cutting horses examined at the Texas A&M University Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2015, because of lameness or poor performance.

PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed, and data were collected regarding signalment, history, findings on physical and lameness examinations, results of diagnostic procedures performed, diagnosis, and treatment. Distribution of observed proportions of forelimb and hind limb involvement was compared with a hypothetical distribution of 50% by means of a χ2 test.

RESULTS More horses were examined because of a recent decrease in performance (116/200 [58%]) than for lameness (84 [42%]). All horses had at least 1 lame limb, with lameness affecting a total of 281 limbs. Of the 281 lame limbs, 189 (67%) were hind limbs and 92 (33%) were forelimbs. These proportions were substantially different from a hypothetical distribution of 50% hind limbs and 50% forelimbs. The most common performance change was that horses would not reverse direction to follow prespecified individual cattle, and the most common cause of lameness was pain localized to the stifle joint region (69 [35%]).

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Cutting horses sustained more hind limb than forelimb musculoskeletal problems, and although these horses were more likely to be examined for decreased performance than lameness, veterinarians should be vigilant for problems affecting the stifle joint region.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine clinical, radiographic, and scintigraphic abnormalities in and treatment and outcome of horses with trauma-induced osteomyelitis of the proximal aspect of the radius.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—5 horses.

Procedure—Data collected from the medical records included signalment; history; horse use; degree of lameness; radiographic, ultrasonographic, and scintigraphic findings; treatment; and outcome.

Results—Duration of lameness prior to referral ranged from 14 to 60 days. Mean severity of lameness was grade 3 of 5, and all horses had a single limb affected. All horses had signs of pain during elbow joint manipulation and digital palpation over the lateral aspect of the proximal end of the radius. Radiographic lesions consisted of periosteal proliferation, osteolysis, and subchondral bone lysis. Scintigraphy in 3 horses revealed intense pharmaceutical uptake diffusely involving the proximal end of the radius. Two horses had sepsis of the elbow joint. All horses were treated with antimicrobials long-term; 1 horse was also treated by local perfusion of the radial medullary cavity through an indwelling cannulated screw. At follow-up, all horses had returned to their previous function.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggest that osteomyelitis of the proximal end of the radius can result from a traumatic injury to the antebrachium. Because lesions may be an extension of septic arthritis, a thorough examination of the wound area and elbow joint is recommended. Prolonged systemic antimicrobial treatment can result in a successful outcome. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:486–491)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association