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  • Author or Editor: Takanori Narita x
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Abstract

Objective—To investigate the in vitro differentiation of canine bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) into functional, mature neurons.

Sample—Bone marrow from 6 adult dogs.

Procedures—BMSCs were isolated from bone marrow and chemically induced to develop into neurons. The morphology of the BMSCs during neuronal induction was monitored, and immunocytochemical analyses for neuron markers were performed after the induction. Real-time PCR methods were used to evaluate the mRNA expression levels of markers for neural stem or progenitor cells, neurons, and ion channels, and western blotting was used to assess the expression of neuronal proteins before and after neuronal induction. The electrophysiological properties of the neuron-like cells induced from canine BMSCs were evaluated with fluorescent dye to monitor Ca2+ influx.

Results—Canine BMSCs developed a neuron-like morphology after neuronal induction. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that these neuron-like cells were positive for neuron markers. After induction, the cells’ mRNA expression levels of almost all neuron and ion channel markers increased, and the protein expression levels of nestin and neurofilament-L increased significantly. However, the neuron-like cells derived from canine BMSCs did not have the Ca2+ influx characteristic of spiking neurons.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Although canine BMSCs had neuron-like morphological and biochemical properties after induction, they did not develop the electrophysiological characteristics of neurons. Thus, these results have suggested that canine BMSCs could have the capacity to differentiate into a neuronal lineage, but the differentiation protocol used may have been insufficient to induce development into functional neurons.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Comparing the utility of the anti-human serum amyloid A (SAA)-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies assays (LZ-SAA) with the pure monoclonal anti-human antibody assays (VET-SAA) during clinical practice in primary care hospital populations by measuring SAA measurement in healthy and diseased domestic cats.

ANIMALS

52 healthy and 185 diseased client-owned cats.

METHODS

SAA concentration was measured using different LZ-SAA and VET-SAA measurements for healthy and various diseased cats. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated for each disease.

RESULTS

VET-SAA has higher sensitivity than LZ-SAA for the most common diseases presenting to primary care veterinary hospitals, including chronic kidney disease, tumors, and gingivostomatitis. Our results reveal the capability of detecting low SAA concentrations in healthy and diseased cats using VET-SAA in contrast to LZ-SAA, which found elevations of SAA concentrations only in diseased cats.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Our findings indicate that switching to the new VET-SAA instead of the conventional LZ-SAA will likely enhance the diagnostic performance in primary care veterinary hospitals.

Open access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We identified the associated factors and compared the survival times of feline hyperthyroidism (FHT) between thyroidectomy and methimazole alone.

METHODS

The medical records of 41 cats diagnosed with new-onset hyperthyroidism were retrospectively reviewed. The cats were categorized into the thyroidectomy (n = 15) and methimazole (26) treatment groups. Survival analyses using the Kaplan-Meier method, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazards models were conducted to compare the time to the selected outcomes.

RESULTS

Univariate analysis revealed that survival time was significantly longer with thyroidectomy than with methimazole (P < .001). Multivariate analyses revealed thyroidectomy as an independent prognostic factor for good outcomes (hazard ratio, 0.209; 95% CI, 0.073 to 0.601; P = .004). The recurrence rate was significantly lower in cats that underwent thyroidectomy than in those that received methimazole alone (P = .011).

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Compared with methimazole alone, thyroidectomy was associated with a longer survival time in FHT and can be considered an irreversible treatment modality in settings where radioisotopes are not available.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association