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  • Author or Editor: T. S. Woodruff x
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SUMMARY

An agar gel immunodiffusion (agid) test was used over a 3-year period to examine 1,871 serum samples from sheep representing 5 Mycobacterium paratuberculosis — infected flocks and 4 flocks presumed to be uninfected. Of 1,032 sheep, 31 had positive agid test results (scoring 1 to 5), and 23 of these 31 were necropsied. Infection with M paratuberculosis was confirmed by 1 or more of the following findings: observation of typical lesions on histologic examination of sections of ileum or ileocecal lymph nodes, observation of clumps of acid-fast bacteria in mucosal smears of ileum, and isolation of the organism from feces or tissue. False-positive results on agid testing were not found in sheep from flocks known to have exposure to Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis. Diarrhea in infected sheep was observed infrequently; chronic, severe weight loss was the most common sign observed. On histologic examination of tissues from 20 infected sheep, 16 (80%) had diffuse lesions of the ileum and 13 (65%) had acid-fast bacteria in areas of ileal inflammation; 4 had discrete granulomas and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrates in the ileum. Sheep with diffuse lesions tended to have higher mean scores on agid testing and examination for acid-fast bacteria, compared with those from sheep with more discrete lesions. Bacteriologic culture yielded M paratuberculosis from only 3 sheep with paratuberculosis. On the basis of results of this study, we suggest that the nature of the response to infection with M paratuberculosis may influence the results of diagnostic tests for paratuberculosis, and that agid testing may be useful to identify M paratuberculosis infection in sheep with chronic weight loss and in flock-screening programs.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

SUMMARY

A dot elisa was developed for detection of antibodies to Mycobacterium paratuberculosis. The assay was evaluated by testing sera from cattle that were determined, by bacteriologic culturing of feces, to be infected with M paratuberculosis and were suspected of having clinical disease. Further evaluation involved testing sera from cattle in which M paratuberculosis had not been isolated from feces on several attempts. Results of the dot elisa were positive for sera from 86 of 101 infected cattle, and results were negative for sera from 64 of 64 noninfected cattle. Results of conventional elisa and agar gel immunodiffusion (agid) tests were positive for 79 of 99 and for 51 of 101 infected cattle, respectively.

The dot elisa also was evaluated by comparing results of testing 708 sera with results of bacteriologic culturing of matched fecal samples from 262 cattle in 3 central Ohio dairy herds known to include cattle infected with M paratuberculosis. Results of the dot elisa were positive for 25 of 39 sera from cattle with positive results on culturing of concurrently obtained fecal specimens. The dot elisa results were negative for 661 of 669 sera from cattle with negative results to culturing of concurrently obtained fecal specimens. The 39 sera from cattle with positive results on bacteriologie culturing of matched fecal specimens had positive results for elisa and the agid test 25 and 14 times, respectively. The 669 sera from cattle with concurrently negative results on bacteriologie culturing of feces had negative results to elisa and the agid test 559 and 668 times, respectively.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research