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  • Author or Editor: Susan M. Newell x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the esophageal passage of capsules in clinically normal cats and determine the incidence of prolonged transit or entrapment.

Animals—12 clinically normal adult cats.

Procedure—Esophageal transit of barium sulfatefilled capsules was evaluated fluoroscopically. Each cat was examined 3 times (36 examinations). Esophageal transit times were classified as normal (≤ 30 seconds) or prolonged (> 30 but ≤ 240 seconds). Capsules were considered entrapped when transit times were > 240 seconds.

Results—Transit times were normal in 10 of the 36 (27.8%) examinations, whereas times were prolonged in 7 (19.4%) examinations. Capsules became entrapped in the midcervical region of the esophagus during 19 (52.8%) examinations. Following termination of each examination, cats with entrapped capsules were fed a small amount (0.5 to 1 ounce) of food; this resulted in passage of the capsule to the stomach.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The possibility of medication-induced esophagitis should be considered when orally administering ulcerogenic drugs to cats. It is recommended that a small volume of food be given following medications to ensure complete esophageal clearance. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61: 655–657)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine the relationship between parturition date and fetal skeletal mineralization detected radiographically in cats.

Design—Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—31 queens and their 49 pregnancies.

Procedure—Seventeen pregnant queens were radiographed with a computed radiography system every 2 to 3 days from 1 week after pregnancy was identified by abdominal palpation until parturition. Radiographs were evaluated to determine the first identifiable mineralization of 16 bony structures and teeth during each pregnancy. This information was used to establish a table of expected parturition dates on the basis of fetal mineralization. Single radiographs from an additional 32 pregnant cats were evaluated, and predictions of parturition dates were made on the basis of the mineralization table.

Results—Mineralization was first detected 25 to 29 days prior to parturition (dpp). Mineralization was determined for the spinal column (22 to 27 dpp), skull (21 to 27 dpp), ribs (20 to 25 dpp), scapula (17 to 24 dpp), humerus (20 to 24 dpp), femur (19 to 23 dpp), radius (15 to 22 dpp), tibia (15 to 21 dpp), ulna (5 to 21 dpp), pelvis (8 to 20 dpp), fibula (0 to 17 dpp), tail (8 to 16 dpp), metacarpals and metatarsals (3 to 14 dpp), phalanges (0 to 11 dpp), calcaneus (0 to 10 dpp), and teeth (1 to 6 dpp). Date of parturition was predictable within 3 days in 75% of cats.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Identification of bony structures in the fetus is useful in estimating the time to parturition in queens. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:1614–1616)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare radius of curvature along the ulnar trochlear notch of Rottweilers and Greyhounds to determine whether morphologic differences exist that may contribute to the cause and pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers.

Sample Population—Paired elbow joints from 13 Rottweilers and 14 Greyhounds.

Procedure—Elbow joints were radiographically scored on the basis of severity of osteoarthritic lesions. The articular contour of each ulnar trochlear notch was digitized. The radius of curvature at defined points along the ulnar trochlear notch was compared between breeds.

Results—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch was not a constant function of arc length in either breed but had a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Radius of curvature was greatest at each end of the ulnar trochlear notch and had 2 peaks in the midportion of the notch in both breeds. These peaks occurred farther distally in the notch and were larger in Rottweiler ulnae than Greyhound ulnae. A significant difference in mean radius of curvature was detected between breeds at these peaks. Greyhounds had significantly greater mean radius of curvature at the end of the medial coronoid process, compared with Rottweilers.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Radius of curvature of the ulnar trochlear notch is a complex function of arc length in Rottweilers and Greyhounds. The waveform has a consistent characteristic appearance in both breeds. Although significant differences were identified between breeds, associations between these differences and cause or pathogenesis of fragmented coronoid process in Rottweilers were not apparent. ( Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:968–973)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research