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Abstract

Objective—To examine the secretory response (in the presence and absence of prostaglandin inhibition) in vitro and structural alterations of colonic mucosa in horses after intragastric administration of black walnut extract (BWE).

Animals—14 adult horses.

Procedure—Seven horses were administered BWE intragastrically and monitored for 11 hours. Tissue samples were obtained from the right ventral, left ventral, and right dorsal colons (RVC, LVC, and RDC, respectively) of the 7 BWE-treated and 7 control horses. Tissue samples were examined via light microscopy, and the extent of hemorrhage, edema, and granulocytic cellular infiltration (neutrophils and eosinophils) was graded. Colonic mucosal segments were incubated with or without flunixin meglumine (FLM) for 240 minutes; spontaneous electrical potential difference and short-circuit current (Isc) were recorded and used to calculate mucosal resistance.

Results—Colonic tissues from BWE-treated horses (with or without FLM exposure) had an overall greater Isc during the 240-minute incubation period, compared with tissues from control horses. The resistance pattern in RVC, LVC, and RDC samples (with or without FLM exposure) from BWE-treated horses was decreased overall, compared with control tissues (with or without FLM exposure). Histologically, colonic mucosal tissues from BWE-treated horses had more severe inflammation (involving primarily eosinophils), edema, and hemorrhage, compared with tissue from control horses.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In horses, BWE administration appears to cause an inflammatory response in colonic mucosal epithelium that results in mucosal barrier compromise as indicated by decreased mucosal resistance with presumed concomitant electrogenic chloride secretory response, which is not associated with prostaglandin mediation. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:443–449)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate changes in digital vascular function in horses with carbohydrate overload (CHO)-induced laminitis and determine the effects of an endothelin (ET) receptor antagonist and nitroglycerin on laminitis-associated vascular dysfunction.

Animals—20 adult horses without abnormalities of the digit.

Procedures—Hemodynamic variables were recorded before (baseline) and hourly after all horses were administered a CHO ration via nasogastric tube. In 4 groups of 5 horses each, saline (0.9% NaCl) solution or ET receptor antagonist (10−5M in digital blood) was administered into the digital arterial circulation according to 1 of 2 schedules. During anesthesia, blood flow; arterial, venous, and capillary pressures; and total, precapillary, and postcapillary resistances were measured in an isolated perfused digit of each horse. In all groups, nitroglycerin was infused (10−5M in digital blood), and digital microvascular assessments were repeated.

Results—The CHO caused a significant decrease in right atrial pressure by 14 hours that was not affected by administration of saline solution or ET receptor antagonist. In isolated digits of anesthetized horses, CHO resulted in a significant decrease in digital blood flow associated with a significant increase in total and postcapillary resistances. Treatment with the ET receptor antagonist and nitroglycerin caused a significant decrease in total resistance. Postcapillary resistance was significantly decreased following treatment with the ET receptor antagonist but was not altered by treatment with nitroglycerin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Treatment with an ET receptor antagonist and nitroglycerin resulted in significant improvement in vascular resistance in isolated perfused digits of anesthetized horses with CHO-induced laminitis.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Medical records of 21 cats with spinal lymphoma were reviewed. All cats were evaluated for neurologic deficits, although 85% of cats necropsied had multicentric disease. Eighty-one percent of cats had hind limb paresis. Results of FeLV tests were positive in 84.2% (16/19) of the cats, and 68.7% (11/16) of the cats had leukemic bone marrow. Spinal lymphoma was confirmed by necropsy in 13 cats, by examination of a biopsy specimen in 1 cat, and by examination of cells aspirated from an epidural lesion in 2 cats. In the remaining 5 cats, a presumptive diagnosis was made on the basis of neurologic examination findings, positive FeLV test results, and leukemic bone marrow.

Nine cats were treated with chemotherapy alone. The complete remission rate was 50% in 6 cats given cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone. The median duration of complete remission was 14 weeks. Complete remissions were not observed in 3 cats given only corticosteroids. A single cat treated by laminectomy and postoperative chemotherapy had a prolonged remission (62 weeks).

At necropsy, lymphoma of the cns was limited to the vertebral canal in 10 of 13 cats; 2 cats had malignant tissue in the brain and vertebral canal, and in the remaining cat, the tumor extended into the brachial plexus. Most tumors extended over multiple vertebral bodies, and 4 cats had more than 1 level of spinal cord involvement. The lymphoma was high-grade lymphoblastic or immunoblastic type in all cats.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the in vitro effects of oxytocin, acepromazine, xylazine, butorphanol, detomidine, dantrolene, isoproterenol, and terbutaline on skeletal and smooth muscle from the equine esophagus.

Animals—14 adult horses without digestive tract disease.

Procedure—Circular and longitudinal strips from the skeletal and smooth muscle of the esophagus were suspended in tissue baths, connected to force-displacement transducers interfaced with a physiograph, and electrical field stimulation was applied. Cumulative concentration-response curves were generated for oxytocin, acepromazine, xylazine, detomidine, butorphanol, isoproterenol, terbutaline, and dantrolene. Mean maximum twitch amplitude for 3 contractions/min was recorded and compared with predrug-vehicle values for the skeletal muscle segments, and area under the curve (AUC) for 3 contractions/min was compared with predrug-vehicle values for the smooth muscle segments.

Results—No drugs caused a significant change in skeletal muscle response. In smooth muscle, isoproterenol, terbutaline, and oxytocin significantly reduced AUC in a concentration-dependent manner. Maximum reduction in AUC was 69% at 10–4M for isoproterenol, 63% at 10–5M for terbutaline, and 64% at 10–4M for oxytocin.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Isoproterenol, terbutaline, and oxytocin cause relaxation of the smooth muscle portion of the esophagus. The clinical relaxant effects on the proximal portion of the esophagus reported of drugs such as oxytocin, detomidine, and acepromazine may be the result of centrally mediated mechanisms. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1732–1737)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To compare effects of oxytocin, acepromazine maleate, xylazine hydrochloride-butorphanol tartrate, guaifenesin, and detomidine hydrochloride on esophageal manometric pressure in horses.

Animals—8 healthy adult horses.

Procedure—A nasogastric tube, modified with 3 polyethylene tubes that exited at the postpharyngeal area, thoracic inlet, and distal portion of the esophagus, was fitted for each horse. Amplitude, duration, and rate of propagation of pressure waveforms induced by swallows were measured at 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 minutes after administration of oxytocin, detomidine, acepromazine, xylazine-butorphanol, guaifenesin, or saline (0.9% NaCl) solution. Number of spontaneous swallows, spontaneous events (contractions that occurred in the absence of a swallow stimulus), and high-pressure events (sustained increases in baseline pressure of > 10 mm Hg) were compared before and after drug administration.

Results—At 5 minutes after administration, detomidine increased waveform amplitude and decreased waveform duration at the thoracic inlet. At 10 minutes after administration, detomidine increased waveform duration at the thoracic inlet. Acepromazine administration increased the number of spontaneous events at the thoracic inlet and distal portion of the esophagus. Acepromazine and detomidine administration increased the number of high-pressure events at the thoracic inlet. Guaifenesin administration increased the number of spontaneous events at the thoracic inlet. Xylazine-butorphanol, detomidine, acepromazine, and guaifenesin administration decreased the number of spontaneous swallows.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Detomidine, acepromazine, and a combination of xylazine butorphanol had the greatest effect on esophageal motility when evaluated manometrically. Reduction in spontaneous swallowing and changes in normal, coordinated peristaltic activity are the most clinically relevant effects. (Am J Vet Res 2002;63:1738–1744)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the humoral immune response of Asian elephants to a primary IM vaccination with either 1 or 2 doses of a commercially available inactivated rabies virus vaccine and evaluate the anamnestic response to a 1-dose booster vaccination.

Animals—16 captive Asian elephants.

Procedures—Elephants with no known prior rabies vaccinations were assigned into 2 treatment groups of 8 elephants; 1 group received 1 dose of vaccine, and the other group received 2 doses of vaccine 9 days apart. All elephants received one or two 4-mL IM injections of a monovalent inactivated rabies virus vaccine. Blood was collected prior to vaccination (day 0) and on days 9, 35, 112, and 344. All elephants received 1 booster dose of vaccine on day 344, and a final blood sample was taken 40 days later (day 384). Serum was tested for rabies virus–neutralizing antibodies by use of the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test.

Results—All elephants were seronegative prior to vaccination. There were significant differences in the rabies geometric mean titers between the 2 elephant groups at days 35, 112, and 202. Both groups had a strong anamnestic response 40 days after the booster given at day 344.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results confirmed the ability of Asian elephants to develop a humoral immune response after vaccination with a commercially available monovalent inactivated rabies virus vaccine and the feasibility of instituting a rabies virus vaccination program for elephants that are in frequent contact with humans. A 2-dose series of rabies virus vaccine should provide an adequate antibody response in elephants, and annual boosters should maintain the antibody response in this species.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Objective

To examine clinical and pathologic findings in 60 ferrets with lymphoma.

Design

Retrospective case series.

Animals

60 ferrets in which the diagnosis of lymphoma had been confirmed by means of histologic examination of biopsy or necropsy specimens.

Procedure

Information including age, sex, coat color, history, clinical signs, clinicopathologic abnormalities, treatment, outcome, and results of histologic examination of biopsy and necropsy specimens were retrieved from medical records of ferrets with spontaneous lymphoma examined between 1982 and 1994 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology or private veterinary practices in 10 states. Classification of lymphoma was assigned according to the National Cancer Institute's working formulation for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, χ2 Trend analysis was used to determine whether age was associated with history, clinical signs, hematologic abnormalities, stage, histologic grade, or outcome.

Results

Acute onset, mediastinal mass, lymphocytosis, and multicentric distribution were linked with younger ferrets, and lymphopenia and survival longer than 2 months after diagnosis was associated with older ferrets. Twenty percent of ferrets in this study had cohabitated with another ferret with lymphoma. Chemotherapeutic efficacy was not evaluated.

Clinical Implications

Clinical and pathologic features linked with age should be considered when evaluating diagnostic and therapeutic options for ferrets with lymphoma. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;208: 1297–1301)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine and compare the number, type, location, and distribution of apoptotic epidermal cells in the laminae of clinically normal horses and horses with laminitis.

Sample Population—Formalin-fixed samples of digital lamellar tissue from 47 horses (including clinically normal horses [controls; n = 7], horses with acute [4] and chronic [7] naturally acquired laminitis, and horses with black walnut extract-induced [11] or carbohydrate overload-induced [18] laminitis).

Procedure—Blocks of paraffin-embedded lamellar tissues were stained for DNA fragmentation with the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL) technique. Differential immunohistochemical staining for caspases 3 and 14 were used to confirm apoptosis.

Results—The number of TUNEL-positive epidermal cells per 0.1 mm of primary laminae was significantly greater in the acute laminitis group than in the other groups. In the acute laminitis group, there were 17 and 1,025 times as many TUNEL-positive basal layer cells and keratinocytes, respectively, compared with the control group. Apoptosis of TUNEL-positive basal layer cells was confirmed by results of caspase 3 immunohistochemical staining. The TUNEL-positive keratinocytes did not stain for caspases 3 or 14.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The large number of apoptotic basal layer cells detected in the lamellar tissue of horses with acute naturally acquired laminitis suggests that apoptosis may be important in the development of acute laminitis. The role of the large number of TUNEL-positive keratinocytes detected in the interface of primary and secondary epidermal laminae of horses with acute laminitis remains to be elucidated. ( Am J Vet Res 2004;65:578–585)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To characterize the in vitro response of equine cecal longitudinal smooth muscle (CLSM) to endothelin (ET)-1 and assess the role of ETA and ETB receptors in those ET-1–induced responses.

Animals—36 horses without gastrointestinal tract disease.

Procedure—To determine cumulative concentrationresponse relationships, CLSM strips were suspended in tissue baths containing graded concentrations of ET-1 (10–9 to 10–6M) with or without BQ-123 (ETA receptor antagonist); with or without IRL-1038 (ETB receptor antagonist); or with both antagonists at concentrations of 10–9, 10–7, and 10–5M. To determine the percentage change in baseline tension of CLSM, the areas under the curve during the 3-minute periods before and after addition of each dose were compared . Also, the effects of ET-1 and a combination of selective ETA and ETB receptor antagonists on electrically evoked contractions were studied.

Results—ET-1 caused sustained increases in CLSM tension in a concentration-dependent manner. Contractile responses to ET-1 were not significantly inhibited by either BQ-123 or IRL-1038 alone at any concentration; however, responses were significantly inhibited by exposure to the antagonists together at a concentration of 10–5M. Electrical field stimulation did not change the spontaneous contractile activity of CLSM and did not significantly alter the tissue response to ET-1, BQ-123, or IRL-1038.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicated that ET-1 has a contractile effect on equine CLSM that is mediated via ETA and ETB receptors. In vitro spontaneous contractions of equine CLSM apparently originate in the smooth muscle and not the enteric nervous system. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:1202–1208)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To identify differentially expressed genes in pulmonary tissues of horses affected with summer pasture-associated obstructive pulmonary disease (SPAOPD), which is a form of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO), compared with those of unaffected horses.

Animals—6 horses with SPAOPD-RAO and 6 unaffected (healthy) horses.

Procedures—Horses were assigned to 2 groups on the basis of medical history, clinical score, and transpleural pressure. Total RNA from each of the 5 lung lobes of each of the 6 SPAOPD-RAO–affected horses was extracted and pooled. Similarly, total RNA from unaffected horses was pooled. Differential display (DD) PCR assay was performed, and differentially expressed bands were purified and cloned into a plasmid vector. Plasmids were extracted from recombinant colonies, and purified DNA was sequenced. Genes of interest for RAO pathogenesis were identified. Real-time PCR assay was performed to confirm findings for the DD PCR assay.

Results—18 differentially expressed genes (17 upregulated and 1 downregulated) were identified. Three genes of particular interest were found to be altered (2 upregulated and 1 downregulated) in horses with SPAOPD-RAO by use of real-time PCR assay, and these findings matched the differential expression found by use of the DD PCR assay.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—SPAOPD-RAO in horses is a multifactorial, complex disease involving several genes. Upregulated genes, particularly β2-microglobulin, and the downregulated secretoglobin gene can serve as marker genes that may help to identify SPAOPD-RAO at an early age.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research