Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Susan L. White x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

SUMMARY

Blood ionized calcium (Ca2+) and pH; plasma lactate concentrations; and total protein, total calcium (CaT), albumin, and phosphorus concentrations in serum were determined in 40 healthy horses before (T1), at the finish line (T2), and 10 minutes after the finish (T3) of the cross-country phase of a 3-day-event competition. Mean (± sem) Ca2+ concentrations decreased from 6.22 ± 0.04 mg/dl at T1 to 5.04 ± 0.07 mg/dl at T2 (P ≤ 0.05). This decrease was accompanied by a nonsignificant increase in CaT between T1 and T2. The mean (± sem) percent ionization of calcium decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05), from 50.9 ± 2.75% at T1 to 40.3 ± 3.58% at T2. Significant increases in mean albumin, total protein, phosphorus, and lactate concentrations and a significant decrease in mean pH were observed at T2 (P ≤ 0.05). At T3, mean Ca2+ and percent ionization had increased, but remained significantly less than resting values. Mean CaT was significantly decreased at T3, compared with values at T1 and T2. Correlation of mean Ca2+ concentration with all other measured variables at each time was evaluated; correlation coefficients between mean Ca2+ and all other variables were low (r 2 ≤ 0.38), indicating low biological significance.

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Summary

Body weight of 48 horses competing in a 3-day event was measured the day before the event (baseline), following the dressage phase of the event (day 1), after the endurance phases of the event (day 2), and 18 to 24 hours after the endurance phases (day 3). Plasma sodium and potassium concentrations were measured the evening before, immediately after, and 10 minutes after the endurance phases. Total body water, water loss, and net exchangeable cation loss were then calculated.

Body weight and total body water were significantly decreased, compared with baseline values, at all times during the event, and significant water loss was detected. The largest changes were recorded after the endurance phases of the event. Water deficits were still detected 18 to 24 hours after the endurance phases of the event.

Mean plasma sodium concentration was significantly increased immediately after the endurance phases of the event, compared with concentration measured the evening before, and remained increased after the 10-minute recovery period, presumably because of dehydration. Mean plasma potassium concentration was significantly increased immediately after the endurance phases of the event, compared with concentration measured the evening before, but was not increased after the 10-minute recovery period.

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To investigate risk factors for the development of pasture- and endocrinopathy-associated laminitis (PEAL) in horses and ponies in North America.

DESIGN Case-control study.

ANIMALS 199 horses with incident cases of PEAL and 351 horses from 2 control populations (healthy horses [n = 198] and horses with lameness not caused by laminitis [153]) that were evaluated in North America between January 2012 and December 2015 by veterinarian members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners.

PROCEDURES North American members of the American Association of Equine Practitioners were contacted to participate in the study, and participating veterinarians provided historical data on incident cases of PEAL, each matched with a healthy control and a lameness control. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to compare data on PEAL-affected horses with data on horses from each set of controls.

RESULTS Horses with an obese body condition (ie, body condition score ≥ 7), generalized or regional adiposity (alone or in combination), preexisting endocrinopathy, or recent (within 30 days) glucocorticoid administration had increased odds of developing PEAL, compared with horses that did not have these findings.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The present study identified several risk factors for PEAL that may assist not only in managing and preventing this form of laminitis, but also in guiding future research into its pathogenesis.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

As efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned dogs and cats have increased, greater attention has been focused on spay-neuter programs throughout the United States. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of programs have been developed to increase delivery of spay-neuter services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, feral cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to ensure a consistent level of care, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. The guidelines consist of recommendations for preoperative care (eg, patient transport and housing, patient selection, client communication, record keeping, and medical considerations), anesthetic management (eg, equipment, monitoring, perioperative considerations, anesthetic protocols, and emergency preparedness), surgical care (eg, operating-area environment; surgical-pack preparation; patient preparation; surgeon preparation; surgical procedures for pediatric, juvenile, and adult patients; and identification of neutered animals), and postoperative care (eg, analgesia, recovery, and release). These guidelines are based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, microbiology, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

As community efforts to reduce the overpopulation and euthanasia of unwanted and unowned cats and dogs have increased, many veterinarians have increasingly focused their clinical efforts on the provision of spay-neuter services. Because of the wide range of geographic and demographic needs, a wide variety of spay-neuter programs have been developed to increase delivery of services to targeted populations of animals, including stationary and mobile clinics, MASH-style operations, shelter services, community cat programs, and services provided through private practitioners. In an effort to promote consistent, high-quality care across the broad range of these programs, the Association of Shelter Veterinarians convened a task force of veterinarians to develop veterinary medical care guidelines for spay-neuter programs. These guidelines consist of recommendations for general patient care and clinical procedures, preoperative care, anesthetic management, surgical procedures, postoperative care, and operations management. They were based on current principles of anesthesiology, critical care medicine, infection control, and surgical practice, as determined from published evidence and expert opinion. They represent acceptable practices that are attainable in spay-neuter programs regardless of location, facility, or type of program. The Association of Shelter Veterinarians envisions that these guidelines will be used by the profession to maintain consistent veterinary medical care in all settings where spay-neuter services are provided and to promote these services as a means of reducing sheltering and euthanasia of cats and dogs.

Full access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association