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Objective

To investigate the effect of gender, body condition, and age as risk factors for the development of hyperlipemia in a population of donkeys.

Design

Retrospective survival analysis.

Animals

130 donkeys with hyperlipemia from a source population of 4,126 donkeys.

Procedure

A Kaplan-Meier product limit survival method was used to evaluate the effect of gender and body condition on the probability of diagnosis of clinical hyperlipemia. Cox's proportional hazard model was used to evaluate the risk of being diagnosed with hyperlipemia controlling for gender, body condition, and age at entry into the population.

Results

Female donkeys and donkeys of obese body condition were more at risk for developing hyperlipemia than males or those of moderate or poor body condition, respectively. None of the females in the study was pregnant. Donkeys were more likely to become hyperlipemic soon after entering the source population. Investigation of the effect of age at entry into the population indicated that older animals were at higher risk than younger animals and, controlling for age, the hazard ratios associated with being female and being overweight were 2 and 1.5, respectively.

Clinical Implications

Although pregnancy and lactation are widely acknowledged as risk factors for hyperlipemia, in this population, females and obese donkeys were at highest risk, regardless of pregnancy status. Risk was greatest around the time donkeys first entered the source population. Control of body condition, reduction of stress, and close monitoring of high-risk donkeys might reduce incidences of, or allow more timely intervention for, this potentially fatal condition. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1996;209:1449–1452)

Free access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective

To determine whether sex or foaling period were associated with time to first race start and whether sex, age at time of first race start, or interrace period were associated with career duration for Thoroughbred racehorses in Australia.

Animals

553 Thoroughbred racehorses.

Procedure

Race records through to the end of the 6-year-old racing season were obtained for each horse. Product-limit survival analysis was used to determine whether sex or foaling period was associated with time to first race start and whether sex or age at first race was associated with career duration. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine whether sex, age at first possible race, age at first race, or inter-race period was associated with time to first race start or career duration.

Results

472 horses (85.4%) raced. Time to first race start was not associated with sex or foaling period. However, males, who had their first race at a younger age and a greater mean number of rest days between races, had longer careers. The hazard ratio for career duration of males versus females, controlling for age at time of first race and inter-race period (0.27), confirmed that males had a higher probability of a long racing career.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance

Results suggest that for Thoroughbred racehorses, sex and time of birth during the foaling season were not associated with time to first race. Male Thoroughbred racehorses that were raced less intensively or raced at a younger age were more likely to have long racing careers. (Am J Vet Res 1999;60:1196–1200)

Free access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research