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  • Author or Editor: Steven R. Bolin x
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Abstract

Objective—To examine effects of co-infection with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Bordetella bronchiseptica in pigs.

Animals—Forty 3-week-old pigs.

Procedure—30 pigs (10 pigs/group) were inoculated with PRRSV, B bronchiseptica, or both. Ten noninoculated pigs were control animals.

Results—Clinical signs, febrile response, and decreased weight gain were most severe in the group inoculated with both organisms. The PRRSV was isolated from all pigs in both groups inoculated with virus. All pigs in both groups that received PRRSV had gross and microscopic lesions consistent with interstitial pneumonia. Bordetella bronchiseptica was cultured from all pigs in both groups inoculated with that bacterium. Colonization of anatomic sites by B bronchiseptica was comparable between both groups. Pigs in the group that received only B bronchiseptica lacked gross or microscopic lung lesions, and B bronchiseptica was not isolated from lung tissue. In the group inoculated with B bronchiseptica and PRRSV, 3 of 5 pigs 10 days after inoculation and 5 of 5 pigs 21 days after inoculation had gross and microscopic lesions consistent with bacterial bronchopneumonia, and B bronchiseptica was isolated from the lungs of 7 of those 10 pigs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Clinical disease was exacerbated in co-infected pigs, including an increased febrile response, decreased weight gain, and B bronchiseptica-induced pneumonia. Bordetella bronchiseptica and PRRSV may circulate in a herd and cause subclinical infections. Therefore, co-infection with these organisms may cause clinical respiratory tract disease and leave pigs more susceptible to subsequent infection with opportunistic bacteria. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:892–899)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether vaccine virus can be detected by use of reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR assays for pooled and individual skin samples obtained from cattle after vaccination with a commercially available modified-live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine.

Animals—12 BVDV-seropositive steer calves and 7 BVDV-seronegative (antibody titer < 1:4) heifers; all cattle were free of persistent infection with BVDV.

Procedures—2 experiments were conducted. Cattle were vaccinated on day 0 with a commercially available modified-live BVDV vaccine. Skin samples were collected on days 0, 3 to 14, 16, and 18 for virus detection by use of RT-PCR assay on individual and pooled samples. In addition, blood samples and nasal swab specimens were collected for virus isolation.

Results—All cattle, regardless of serologic status, had negative results for BVDV as determined by use of RT-PCR assay of individual and pooled skin samples. Virus was detected via virus isolation in serum or the buffy coat in 5 of 7 heifers that were seronegative when vaccinated.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—These findings indicated that it would be unlikely to detect BVDV vaccine virus in skin by use of RT-PCR assay of individual or pooled skin samples obtained from cattle after vaccination with a commercially available modified-live BVDV vaccine. Veterinarians and producers should be confident that positive test results for BVDV on skin samples would not likely be caused by the vaccination virus after administration of a modified-live virus vaccine.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine effects of intranasal inoculation with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) or Bordetella bronchiseptica on challenge with nontoxigenic Pasteurella multocida in pigs.

Animals—Seventy 3-week-old pigs.

Procedure—In experiment 1, pigs were not inoculated (n= 10) or were inoculated with PRRSV (10), P multocida (10), or PRRSV followed by challenge with P multocida (10). In experiment 2, pigs were not inoculated (n = 10) or were inoculated with B bronchiseptica (10) or PRRSV and B bronchiseptica (10); all pigs were challenged with P multocida. Five pigs from each group were necropsied 14 and 21 days after initial inoculations.

ResultsPasteurella multocida was not isolated from tissue specimens of pigs challenged with P multocida alone or after inoculation with PRRSV. However, in pigs challenged after inoculation with B bronchiseptica, P multocida was isolated from specimens of the nasal cavity and tonsil of the soft palate. Number of bacteria isolated increased in pigs challenged after coinoculation with PRRSV and B bronchiseptica, and all 3 agents were isolated from pneumonic lesions in these pigs.

Conclusion and Clinical Relevance—Infection of pigs with B bronchiseptica but not PRRSV prior to challenge with P multocida resulted in colonization of the upper respiratory tract and tonsil of the soft palate with P multocida. Coinfection with PRRSV and B bronchiseptica predisposed pigs to infection of the upper respiratory tract and lung with P multocida. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus and B bronchiseptica may interact to adversely affect respiratory tract defense mechanisms, leaving pigs especially vulnerable to infection with secondary agents such as P multocida. (Am J Vet Res 2001; 62:521–525)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether cattle testing positive for Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosisas determined by microbial culture of feces or antibody ELISA were more likely to have false-positive responses on the caudal fold tuberculin (CFT) test or interferon-γ (IFN-γ) assay for Mycobacterium bovis than cattle testing negative for M paratuberculosis.

Animals—1,043 cattle from 10 herds in Michigan.

Procedure—Feces and blood samples for plasma were collected from cattle ≥ 24 months old on the day the CFT test was read. Fecal samples were submitted for microbial culture for M paratuberculosis. Plasma samples were tested for antibody against M paratuberculosis, and IFN-γ after stimulation with purified protein derivative tuberculin from M bovis or M avium.

Results—Of 1,043 cattle, 180 (17.3%) had positive CFT test results (suspects) and 8 (0.8%) had positive IFN-γ assay results after stimulation with purified protein derivative tuberculin from M bovis. Forty-five (4.3%) and 115 (11.0%) cattle tested positive for M paratuberculosis as determined by microbial culture of feces and antibody ELISA, respectively. Cattle with positive responses for M paratuberculosis appeared to have an increased likelihood of false-positive results on the CFT test, although this association was not significant.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—No significant association was detected among cattle testing positive for M paratuberculosis as determined by microbial culture of feces and antibody ELISA and positive CFT test and IFN-γ assay results for M bovis. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2005;226:429–435)

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

CASE DESCRIPTION Within a 2-week period, 4 southern cassowaries (Casuarius casuarius) at an exhibit at a Virginia zoo died acutely subsequent to eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEEV) infection. This prompted a search for other EEEV outbreaks in cassowaries, which resulted in the identification of 2 additional cassowaries that died of EEEV infection at a conservation center in Florida.

CLINICAL FINDINGS Both juvenile and adult birds were affected. Three of the 6 birds died acutely with no premonitory signs. Clinical disease in the other 3 birds was characterized by lethargy and ataxia. Clinicopathologic findings typically included leukocytosis, hyperuricemia, abnormally high liver enzyme activities, and hyper–β globulinemia, which was indicative of acute inflammation.

TREATMENT AND OUTCOME The 3 birds with clinical disease died despite supportive treatment. Gross abnormalities commonly observed during necropsy included coelomitis and evidence of diarrhea. Frequently observed histologic abnormalities were encephalitis, vasculitis, hepatitis, nephritis, and splenitis. The diagnosis of EEEV infection was confirmed by detection of serum anti-EEEV antibodies or detection of viral RNA in brain tissue by use of a reverse-transcriptase PCR assay.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that EEEV can cause high morbidity and mortality rates in southern cassowaries. Clinical disease might be reduced or prevented by vaccination, isolation of ill birds, and mosquito control strategies.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the efficacy of a commercially available killed bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) vaccine to protect against fetal infection in pregnant cattle continually exposed to cattle persistently infected with the BVDV.

Animals—60 crossbred beef heifers and 4 cows persistently infected with BVDV.

Procedures—Beef heifers were allocated to 2 groups. One group was vaccinated twice (21-day interval between the initial and booster vaccinations) with a commercially available vaccine against BVDV, and the other group served as nonvaccinated control cattle. Estrus was induced, and the heifers were bred. Pregnancy was confirmed by transrectal palpation. Four cows persistently infected with BVDV were housed with 30 pregnant heifers (15 each from the vaccinated and nonvaccinated groups) from day 52 to 150 of gestation. Fetuses were then harvested by cesarean section and tested for evidence of BVDV infection.

Results—1 control heifer aborted after introduction of the persistently infected cows. Bovine viral diarrhea virus was isolated from 14 of 14 fetuses obtained via cesarean section from control heifers but from only 4 of 15 fetuses obtained via cesarean section from vaccinated heifers; these proportions differed significantly.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A commercially available multivalent vaccine containing an inactivated BVDV fraction significantly reduced the risk of fetal infection with BVDV in heifers continually exposed to cattle persistently infected with BVDV. However, not all vaccinated cattle were protected, which emphasizes the need for biosecurity measures and elimination of cattle persistently infected with BVDV in addition to vaccination within a herd.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the effects of constant exposure to cattle persistently infected (PI) with bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) on health and performance of feedlot cattle.

Design—3 controlled trials.

Animals—Crossbred feedlot cattle (trial 1, n = 184; trial 2, 138; trial 3, 138).

Procedures—Weaned calves were or were not vaccinated against BVDV at feedlot arrival (trial 1) or 2 (trial 2) or 3 (trial 3) weeks before feedlot arrival. During trial 1, half of the calves were commingled with PI cattle throughout the feeding period. During trial 2, 63 calves were exposed to PI cattle before weaning and all calves were exposed to PI cattle throughout the feeding period. During trial 3, all study calves were exposed to PI cattle throughout the feeding period. Morbidity and mortality rates and average daily gain (ADG) data were analyzed.

Results—During trial 1, calves maintained with PI cattle had a higher morbidity rate regardless of BVDV vaccination than did calves not exposed to PI cattle; however, for calves maintained with PI cattle, the morbidity rate for those vaccinated against BVDV was less than that for those not vaccinated against BVDV. During trial 2, calves exposed to PI cattle before weaning or vaccinated against BVDV had lower morbidity and mortality rates and increased ADG, compared with those for calves not exposed to PI cattle before weaning or vaccinated against BVDV. During trial 3, health and performance did not vary between calves that were and were not vaccinated against BVDV.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Exposure of cattle to BVDV naturally or through vaccination before or at feedlot arrival mitigated the negative effects of constant exposure to PI cattle.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To collect and partially characterize strains of bovine viral diarrhea viruses(BVDVs) isolated from persistently infected (PI) calves born to vaccinated dams, determine genetic diversity of the isolated viruses, and identify regional distribution of genetically similar virus subpopulations.

Sample Population—17 noncytopathic (NCP) BVDVs from PI calves from 11 herds of beef or dairy cattle.

Procedures—Viral RNA was extracted from infected cell cultures, and BVDV-specific PCR primers were used to amplify > 1,000 bases of the viral genome. Derived sequences were used for molecular phylogenetic analyses to determine the viral genotype and viral genogroup and to assess genetic similarity among BVDVs.

Results—Analysis of the 17 NCP strains of BVDV failed to detect a viral genotype or viral genogroup not already reported to exist in the United States. One virus was classified as genotype 1, genogroup 1b, and 16 viruses were classified as genotype 2, genogroup 2a. Genotype 2 strains were genetically diverse, and genetic similarities were not obvious among viruses from geographic regions larger than a small locale.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Viruses isolated from herds where a genotype 1, genogroup 1a BVDV vaccine was administered prior to breeding were primarily genetically diverse genotype 2, genogroup 2a BVDVs. Vaccination with multiple BVDV genotypes may be needed to improve protection. Methods used in this study to obtain and analyze field strains are applicable to assessing efficacy of current BVDV vaccines. Candidates for future vaccines are viruses that appear able to elude the immune response of cattle vaccinated against BVDV with existing vaccines.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether an interferon (IFN)-γ response sufficient to categorize cattle as positive for tuberculosis can be detected in blood collected at commencement of exsanguination at slaughter.

Animals—15 Holstein cows.

Procedures—12 cows were experimentally sensitized by SC injection with inactivated Mycobacterium bovis in mineral oil, which induced an immune response that mimicked natural infection with M bovis. Three nonsensitized control cows were injected SC with mineral oil alone. By 5 weeks after injection, only the 12 sensitized cows had positive results for tuberculosis with whole blood IFN-γ assay. At that time, all 15 cows were sent to slaughter and samples of blood were collected from each cow immediately before stunning and at commencement of exsanguination (within 90 seconds after stunning). A whole blood IFN-γ assay was performed on the samples. Conditional probability and paired t tests were used to analyze changes in the categorical test interpretation and qualitative IFN-γ production, respectively.

Results—All 12 sensitized cows had positive results for tuberculosis in samples obtained immediately before stunning, and 9 retained positive results for samples obtained at commencement of exsanguination. There was a significant decrease in the mean background-corrected IFN-γ ELISA optical density values for samples obtained at commencement of exsanguination.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—IFN-γ response sufficient to classify cattle as positive for tuberculosis could be detected in blood collected at commencement of exsanguination. These findings support further development and use of the IFN-γ assay on blood samples collected at exsanguination as part of a bovine tuberculosis surveillance program.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether Mycobacterium bovis remains viable in ensiled forages.

SAMPLE Alfalfa, mixed mostly grass, and corn silages.

PROCEDURES For each of 10 sampling days, six 250-g replicate samples of each feedstuff were created and placed in a film pouch that could be vacuum sealed to simulate the ensiling process. Within each set of replicate samples, 4 were inoculated with 10 mL of mycobacterial liquid culture medium containing viable M bovis and 2 were inoculated with 10 mL of sterile mycobacterial liquid culture medium (controls) on day 0. Pouches were vacuum sealed and stored in the dark at room temperature. On the designated sampling day, 1 control pouch was submitted for forage analysis, and the other pouches were opened, and forage samples were obtained for M bovis culture and analysis with a PCR assay immediately and 24 hours later.

RESULTS None of the control samples had positive M bovis culture or PCR assay results. Among M bovis-inoculated samples, the organism was not cultured from alfalfa and corn silage for > 2 days but was cultured from mixed mostly grass silage for 28 days after inoculation and ensiling initiation. Mycobacterium bovis DNA was detected by PCR assay in samples of all 3 feedstuffs throughout the 112-day observation period.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that properly ensiled forages would be an unlikely source for M bovis transmission to cattle. Further research is necessary to determine whether ensiling kills M bovis or forces it to become dormant and, if the latter, elucidate the conditions that cause it to revert to an infectious state.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research