Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for

  • Author or Editor: Steven G. Friedenberg x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate a group of related Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of sudden death for the presence of arrhythmia and to identify possible patterns of disease inheritance among these dogs.

DESIGN Prospective case series and pedigree investigation.

ANIMALS 25 Rhodesian Ridgebacks with shared bloodlines.

PROCEDURES Pedigrees of 4 young dogs (1 female and 3 males; age, 7 to 12 months) that died suddenly were evaluated, and owners of closely related dogs were asked to participate in the study. Dogs were evaluated by 24-hour Holter monitoring, standard ECG, echocardiography, or some combination of these to assess cardiac status. Necropsy reports, if available, were reviewed.

RESULTS 31 close relatives of the 4 deceased dogs were identified. Of 21 dogs available for examination, 8 (2 males and 6 females) had ventricular tachyarrhythmias (90 to 8,700 ventricular premature complexes [VPCs]/24 h). No dogs had clinical signs of cardiac disease reported. Echocardiographic or necropsy evaluation for 7 of 12 dogs deemed affected (ie, with frequent or complex VPCs or sudden death) did not identify structural lesions. Five of 6 screened parents of affected dogs had 0 to 5 VPCs/24 h (all singlets), consistent with a normal reading. Pedigree evaluation suggested an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance, but autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance could not be ruled out.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Holter monitoring of Rhodesian Ridgebacks with a family history of an arrhythmia or sudden death is recommended for early diagnosis of disease. An autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance in the studied dogs was likely, and inbreeding should be strongly discouraged.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether dogs with head trauma have a greater incidence of seizures than the general canine patient population.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—259 client-owned dogs.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs evaluated for head trauma at The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center from 1999 to 2009 were reviewed. Data were collected regarding the cause of the head trauma, physical examination and neurologic examination findings, comorbidities, and the development of seizures during hospitalization. A telephone survey was conducted to question owners regarding the development of seizures after discharge. Relationships between the nature of the head trauma and the development of seizures were then examined.

Results—3.5% of dogs with head trauma developed in-hospital seizures, and 6.8% of dogs with head trauma for which follow-up information was available developed seizures after hospital discharge, compared with an epilepsy rate of 1.4% in our hospital. Dogs that developed in-hospital seizures were significantly more likely to have been hit by a car or experienced acceleration-deceleration injury. Additionally, 10% of dogs with traumatic brain injury had in-hospital seizures. No visit or patient characteristics were significantly associated with the development of out-of-hospital seizures.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Dogs with head trauma may develop seizures at a greater rate than dogs in the general canine patient population. Particularly in the immediate to early posttraumatic period, clinicians should remain vigilant for the development of posttraumatic seizures and treat patients accordingly.

Restricted access
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To identify cardiac tissue genes and gene pathways differentially expressed between dogs with and without dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM).

ANIMALS 8 dogs with and 5 dogs without DCM.

PROCEDURES Following euthanasia, samples of left ventricular myocardium were collected from each dog. Total RNA was extracted from tissue samples, and RNA sequencing was performed on each sample. Samples from dogs with and without DCM were grouped to identify genes that were differentially regulated between the 2 populations. Overrepresentation analysis was performed on upregulated and downregulated gene sets to identify altered molecular pathways in dogs with DCM.

RESULTS Genes involved in cellular energy metabolism, especially metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, were significantly downregulated in dogs with DCM. Expression of cardiac structural proteins was also altered in affected dogs.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that RNA sequencing may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of DCM in dogs and highlight pathways that should be explored to identify causative mutations and develop novel therapeutic interventions.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) derived from disrupted mitochondria on canine splenocytes and other immune cells.

SAMPLES Liver, spleen, and bone marrow samples obtained from 8 cadavers of healthy research Beagles that had been euthanized for other purposes.

PROCEDURES Mitochondria were obtained from canine hepatocytes, and mitochondrial DAMPs (containing approx 75% mitochondrial proteins) were prepared. Mitochondrial DAMPs and the nuclear cytokine high-mobility group box protein 1 were applied to splenocytes, bone marrow–differentiated dendritic cells, and a canine myelomonocytic cell (DH82) line for 6 or 24 hours. Cell culture supernatants from splenocytes, dendritic cells, and DH82 cells were assayed for tumor necrosis factor α with an ELISA. Expression of tumor necrosis factor α mRNA in splenocytes was evaluated with a quantitative real-time PCR assay.

RESULTS In all cell populations evaluated, production of tumor necrosis factor α was consistently increased by mitochondrial DAMPs at 6 hours (as measured by an ELISA). In contrast, high-mobility group box protein 1 did not have any independent proinflammatory effects in this experimental system.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE The study revealed an in vitro inflammatory effect of mitochondrial DAMPs (containing approx 75% mitochondrial proteins) in canine cells and validated the use of an in vitro splenocyte model to assess DAMP-induced inflammation in dogs. This experimental system may aid in understanding the contribution of DAMPs to sepsis and the systemic inflammatory response syndrome in humans. Further studies in dogs are needed to validate the biological importance of these findings and to evaluate the in vivo role of mitochondrial DAMPs in triggering and perpetuating systemic inflammatory states.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether a mutation in the fibrillin 2 gene (FBN2) is associated with canine hip dysplasia (CHD) and osteoarthritis in dogs.

Animals—-1,551 dogs.

Procedures—Hip conformation was measured radiographically. The FBN2 was sequenced from genomic DNA of 21 Labrador Retrievers and 2 Greyhounds, and a haplotype in intron 30 of FBN2 was sequenced in 90 additional Labrador Retrievers and 143 dogs of 6 other breeds. Steady-state values of FBN2 mRNA and control genes were measured in hip joint tissues of fourteen 8-month-old Labrador Retriever–Greyhound crossbreeds.

Results—The Labrador Retrievers homozygous for a 10-bp deletion haplotype in intron 30 of FBN2 had significantly worse CHD as measured via higher distraction index and extended-hip joint radiograph score and a lower Norberg angle and dorsolateral subluxation score. Among 143 dogs of 6 other breeds, those homozygous for the same deletion haplotype also had significantly worse radiographic CHD. Among the 14 crossbred dogs, as the dorsolateral subluxation score decreased, the capsular FBN2 mRNA increased significantly. Those dogs with incipient hip joint osteoarthritis had significantly increased capsular FBN2 mRNA, compared with those dogs without osteoarthritis. Dogs homozygous for the FBN2 deletion haplotype had significantly less FBN2 mRNA in their femoral head articular cartilage.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The FBN2 deletion haplotype was associated with CHD. Capsular gene expression of FBN2 was confounded by incipient secondary osteoarthritis in dysplastic hip joints. Genes influencing complex traits in dogs can be identified by genome-wide screening, fine mapping, and candidate gene screening.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research