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  • Author or Editor: Steven E. Suter x
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Abstract

Objective—To evaluate the usefulness of a PCR-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay for detecting telomerase activity in cells from a canine transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) cell line and, ultimately, in the urine of dogs with TCC.

Animals—11 dogs with histologic or cytologic evidence of TCC, 10 dogs with benign lower urinary tract disease, and 9 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Telomerase activity was initially evaluated in cells from canine TCC (K9TCC) and telomerase-negative (WI-38) cell lines. Following assay optimization, telomerase stability was evaluated at various storage durations and temperatures. Urine samples were then obtained prospectively from study dogs.

Results—Telomerase activity was detected in the K9TCC cell line. The TRAP assay detected telomerase activity in as few as 10 K9TCC cells alone and as low as 2% of a total cell population in K9TCC and WI-38 mixing experiments. A loss of telomerase activity was detected with increasing urine storage durations at various temperatures. Telomerase activity was clearly detected in samples collected from 10 of 11 dogs with TCC, 2 of 10 dogs with benign lower urinary tract disease, and none of the 9 healthy dogs.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The TRAP-based assay detected telomerase activity in the canine TCC cell line and revealed that the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex was inherently unstable at various storage durations and conditions. Telomerase activity was also detectable in urine samples obtained from dogs with TCC, which suggested the TRAP assay may be useful in diagnosing TCC in dogs.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Case Description—A 3-year-old 10-kg (22-lb) neutered male Cavalier King Charles Spaniel was referred because of an episode of acute vomiting and diarrhea.

Clinical Findings—On physical examination, mild splenomegaly and prominent submandibular and popliteal lymph nodes were detected. Complete blood cell count revealed a high WBC count, characterized by a moderate lymphocytosis with 62% unclassified cells and severe thrombocytopenia with macroplatelets. On cytologic evaluation, the unclassified cells were described as large, neoplastic lymphoid cells containing a large nucleus with lacy chromatin and a large amount of blue vacuolated cytoplasm containing sparse, very fine azurophilic granules. A diagnosis of acute large granular lymphocytic leukemia of splenic origin was made.

Treatment and Outcome—Following induction chemotherapy, the affected dog underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with dog leukocyte antigen–matched CD34+ cells harvested from a sibling of the same litter. Chimerism analysis revealed full donor engraftment within 2 weeks after transplantation that remained stable for at least 2 years, with the dog remaining apparently healthy at home.

Clinical Relevance—Acute leukemias in dogs are rapidly fatal diseases. If an appropriate donor can be located, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation may offer a feasible treatment, although peripheral blood CD34+ cell harvesting requires the availability of cell separator machines and management of graft-versus-host disease with immunosuppressive agents.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine whether thromboelastography is more accurate than conventional methods of evaluating hemostasis for the prediction of clinical bleeding in thrombocytopenic dogs following total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT).

Animals—10 client-owned thrombocytopenic dogs with multicentric lymphoma.

Procedures—Results of a kaolin-activated thromboelastography assay, platelet count, and buccal mucosal bleeding time were evaluated for correlation to clinical bleeding.

Results—Maximum amplitude, derived via thromboelastography, was the only hemostatic variable with significant correlation to clinical bleeding. Buccal mucosal bleeding time had a high sensitivity but poor specificity for identifying dogs with clinical bleeding.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Compared with buccal mucosal bleeding time and platelet count, thromboelastography was more reliable at identifying thrombocytopenic dogs with a low risk of bleeding and could be considered to help guide the use of transfusion products in dogs undergoing TBI and BMT.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To determine the body condition score (BCS) distribution for dogs examined at a teaching hospital and examine whether the BCS distribution for dogs with cancer differed significantly from the distribution for dogs without cancer.

Sample Population—1,777 dogs with cancer and 12,893 dogs without cancer.

Procedures—A retrospective prevalence case-control study was conducted that used medical records from 1999 to 2004. Information was collected on BCS (9-point system), age, breed, sex, neuter status, diagnosis, and corticosteroid administration. Body condition score at the time of examination for cancer (dogs with cancer) or first chronologic visit (dogs without cancer) was recorded. Logistic regression was used to compare BCS prevalence distributions between groups.

Results—The overall prevalence of obese dogs (BCS ≥ 7/9) was 14.8% (2,169/14,670), and the overall prevalence of overweight dogs (BCS ≥ 6/9 to < 7/9) was 21.6% (3,174/14,670). There was a significant difference in the BCS distribution between dogs with and without cancer, with a slightly lower prevalence of being overweight and obese in dogs with cancer. The prevalence of obese and overweight dogs varied with specific cancer types when compared with the prevalence for dogs without cancer.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Differences in obesity prevalence among cancer types is suggestive of an incongruous effect of this variable on cancer expression or a differential effect of specific cancer types on weight status. Systematic use of BCSs will help elucidate the association between obesity and cancer development.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To evaluate the efficacy of doxorubicin for treatment of histiocytic sarcoma (HS) in dogs, whether administered as the sole treatment or as an adjunct to surgery or radiation therapy.

ANIMALS

31 client-owned dogs with localized or disseminated HS examined between 2003 and 2017.

PROCEDURES

Medical records were reviewed retrospectively, and data were collected. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate time-to-progression from the date of first doxorubicin administration and survival time from initial diagnosis. Factors that could be associated with poorer outcomes with doxorubicin treatment were analyzed with log-rank tests.

RESULTS

The objective response rate (ORR) was 26%. When stratified by disease status, dogs with localized and disseminated forms experienced 43% and 21% ORRs, respectively. Median time to progression after initiating doxorubicin treatment (n = 30 dogs) was 42 days. Median survival time from initial diagnosis to death (n = 29 dogs) was 169 days. Complete responses were obtained in only 2 dogs that had localized disease and received multimodality therapy.

CLINICAL RELEVANCE

Benefits of doxorubicin administration in canine HS are modest, with a limited ORR and delay in tumor progression, and are comparable to effects attained with other single-agent regimens.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Case Description—A 12-year-old castrated male mixed-breed dog was evaluated because of blepharospasm and blindness affecting both eyes.

Clinical Findings—During examination and diagnostic testing of the dog, fine-needle aspirates of splenic nodules were examined microscopically and stage Vb multicentric large-cell lymphosarcoma was identified. Aqueocentesis was performed, and sample analysis revealed intraocular lymphosarcoma; B-cell neoplasia was confirmed by use of a PCR assay for antigen receptor rearrangement (PARR) performed on samples of aqueous humor. Secondary uveitis and glaucoma were detected bilaterally in addition to chronic superficial corneal ulcerations in the left eye.

Treatment and Outcome—Treatment for abdominal and intraocular lymphosarcoma involving administration of vincristine, l-asparaginase, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone was initiated. Secondary uveitis and glaucoma were controlled with topical treatment; however, the corneal ulceration did not resolve. Seven weeks following diagnosis, the dog died as a result of complications related to systemic neoplasia and chemotherapy.

Clinical Relevance—In the dog of this report, intraocular lymphosarcoma was diagnosed via PARR performed on samples of aqueous humor. Moreover, the immunophenotype of the neoplastic cells was determined by use of that diagnostic technique. Because secondary uveitis is a common finding in dogs and cats with systemic lymphosarcoma, intraocular lymphosarcoma should be considered as a differential diagnosis; furthermore, investigation (eg, PARR performed on aqueous humor samples) to identify the presence of intraocular lymphosarcoma is warranted, thereby allowing targeted interventions to be considered in management of those patients.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association