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Abstract

Objective—To describe changes in vertical ground reaction forces (GRF) over 48 months in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) of the stifle joint induced by transection of a cranial cruciate ligament (CCL).

Animals—12 clinically normal adult dogs.

Procedure—Vertical GRF (eg, peak force and impulse) were determined prior to and 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, and 12 months after transection of the right CCL. In 7 dogs, data were also collected 24, 32, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection.

Results—Vertical peak force and impulse were significantly decreased in the right hind limb at all times after transection, compared with baseline values. From 10 through 48 months after transection, vertical GRF remained essentially static. Ground reaction forces in the unoperated (left) hind limb also changed significantly during the study. Left vertical impulse significantly increased 3 months after transection, whereas at 24, 38, 42, and 48 months after transection, left vertical peak force was significantly decreased, compared with the baseline value .Mean intradog coefficients of variation (CV) for peak vertical force and impulse ranged from 7.38 and 9.32, respectively, 1 month after transection to 1.96 and 2.76, respectively, at 42 months.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Vertical GRF in the affected hind limb equilibrated approximately 10 months after CCL transection. Prior to this, force transmission across the affected stifle joint changed significantly over time. Intradog CV were small, indicating that GRF may be an appropriate outcome measurement for evaluation of OA development induced by CCL transection in dogs. (Am J Vet Res 2001;62:1207–1211)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To develop a 3-D kinematic model to measure truncal motion in dogs and assess changes in truncal motion in dogs when wearing each of 2 service vests.

ANIMALS

5 adult mixed-breed dogs.

PROCEDURES

27 reflective markers were placed on the pelvis, trunk, and scapula of each dog. Six infrared cameras were placed around a treadmill to track the location of the markers within a calibrated space. Dogs were recorded during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the trunk was created. Dogs were then recorded while wearing a custom vest and an adjustable vest during walking and trotting on the treadmill. Range of motion of the trunk when dogs were and were not wearing vests was compared by repeated-measures ANOVA.

RESULTS

An anatomic coordinate system was established by use of markers located at T1, T13, and the xiphoid process. Range of motion of the trunk during a gait cycle did not differ significantly regardless of the day of the test for both walking and trotting gaits. Trunk motion of dogs when walking and trotting was significantly reduced when dogs were wearing a vest, compared with trunk motion when not wearing a vest.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

A 3-D kinematic model for measuring truncal rotation was developed. Results indicated measurable differences in the gait of dogs when wearing each of the 2 service vests, compared with the gait when not wearing a vest.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
Problem

A 4-year-old neutered male Ragdoll cat weighing 6.4 kg (14.0 lb) was evaluated at the University of Georgia Small Animal Teaching Hospital for ongoing pleural effusion diagnosed as chylothorax at the referring facility 4 months previously. At the time of the initial diagnosis, the cat was evaluated by an internist who confirmed the diagnosis. Appropriate medical management was susbsequently initiated, consisting of a low-fat diet, intermittent thoracocentesis, and rutin administration. When evaluated at the teaching hospital, the cat was receiving a diuretic (furosemide at an unknown dosage) prescribed for an earlier isolated instance of pulmonary edema following thoracocentesis, which

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To identify and critically evaluate the quality of evidence of the most commonly used pharmacologic, nutraceutical, and purported slow-acting drugs of osteoarthritis for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs by use of the FDA's evidence-based medicine scoring system.

Design—Systematic review.

Sample Population—16 clinical trials.

Procedures—A broad bibliographic search was performed prior to May 2006. Inclusion criteria focused on prospective trials evaluating commonly used medical treatment interventions for the management of osteoarthritis in dogs and published in peer-reviewed journals. The analysis consisted of the following: study design rating, quality factor rating, quantity rating, consistency rating, relevance to disease risk reduction rating, and cumulative strength of evidence ranking.

Results—4 trials evaluating meloxicam were rated as type I.Three trials evaluating carprofen were rated as type I, and 2 trials were rated as type III. One trial evaluating each of the following agents was rated as type 1: etodolac; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycan; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. Two trials evaluating pentosan polysulphate and 2 trails evaluating green-lipped mussels were rated as type I. One trial evaluating hyaluronan was rated as type III.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—A high level of comfort exists for meloxicam that the claimed relationship is scientifically valid and that its use is clinically efficacious for the treatment of osteoarthritis in dogs.A moderate level of comfort exists for carprofen; etodolac; pentosan polysulphate; green-lipped mussels; P54FP; polysulfated glycosaminoglycans; and a combination of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride, and manganese ascorbate. An extremely low level of comfort exists for hyaluronan.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate in vivo effects of tepoxalin, an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX), on prostaglandin (PG) and leukotriene production in osteoarthritic dogs.

Animals—7 mixed-breed adult dogs with chronic unilateral arthritis of a stifle joint.

Procedure—Dogs were treated in accordance with a randomized 3-way crossover design. Each dog received an inert substance, meloxicam, or tepoxalin for 10 days. On day 0 (baseline), 3, and 10, dogs were anesthetized and samples of blood, stifle joint synovial fluid, and gastric mucosa were collected. Concentrations of PGE2 were measured in synovial fluid and after lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood; PGE1 and PGE2 synthesis was measured in gastric mucosa. Thromboxane B2 (TxB2) concentration was measured in whole blood. Leukotriene B4 (LTB4) concentration was determined in gastric mucosa and in whole blood after ex vivo stimulation with a calcium ionophore.

Results—Tepoxalin significantly decreased LTB4 concentrations in the blood and gastric mucosa at day 10 and TxB2 concentrations in the blood and PGE2 in the gastric mucosa and synovial fluid at days 3 and 10, compared with baseline values. Meloxicam significantly decreased PGE2 concentrations in the blood at days 3 and 10 and synovial fluid at day 3. Meloxicam also decreased PGE1 and PGE2 synthesis in the gastric mucosa at day 3. Meloxicam did not affect LTB4 synthesis in the blood or LTB4 concentrations in the gastric mucosa.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Tepoxalin has in vivo inhibitory activity against COX-1, COX-2, and 5-LOX in dogs at the current approved recommended dosage. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:966–972)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate in vivo activity of carprofen, deracoxib, and etodolac on prostanoid production in several target tissues in dogs with chronic osteoarthritis.

Animals—8 dogs with chronic unilateral osteoarthritis of the stifle joint.

Procedure—Each dog received carprofen, deracoxib, or etodolac for 10 days with a 30- to 60-day washout period between treatments. On days 0, 3, and 10, prostaglandin (PG) E2 concentrations were measured in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated blood, synovial fluid, and gastric mucosal biopsy specimens; PGE1 concentrations were measured in gastric mucosal biopsy specimens; and thromboxane B2 (TXB2) was evaluated in blood.

Results—Carprofen and deracoxib significantly suppressed PGE2 concentrations in blood at days 3 and 10, compared with baseline, whereas etodolac did not. None of the drugs significantly suppressed TXB2 concentrations in blood or gastric PGE1 synthesis at any time point. All 3 drugs significantly decreased gastric synthesis of PGE2 at day 3 but not day 10 of each treatment period. All 3 drugs decreased synovial fluid PGE2 concentrations in the affected and unaffected stifle joints at days 3 and 10.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results indicate that carprofen and deracoxib act in vivo on target tissues as COX-1–sparing drugs by sparing gastric PGE1 and PGE2 synthesis and production of TXB2 by platelets. Etodolac also appears to be COX-1 sparing but may have variable effects on COX-2 depending on the tissue. In gastric mucosa and synovial fluid, there were no significant differences in PG production between compounds at recommended concentrations. (Am J Vet Res 2005;66:812–817)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine longitudinal changes in serum and synovial fluid concentrations of keratan sulfate (KS) and hyaluronan (HA) after cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) transection in dogs.

Animals—12 clinically normal adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedure—Following CCL transection in the right stifle joint, KS and HA concentrations were determined in serum and neat (undiluted) synovial fluid prior to and 1, 2, 3, and 12 months after surgery. Postsurgical dilution of synovial fluid was corrected by use of urea as a passive marker.

Results—Synovial fluid KS and HA concentrations decreased at 1, 2, and 3 months after surgery in operated stifle joints, compared with baseline values. Synovial fluid KS concentration decreased in unoperated stifle joints at 1 month. A decrease in synovial fluid KS concentration was found in operated stifle joints, compared with unoperated stifle joints, at 2 and 3 months, and a decrease in synovial fluid HA concentrations was also found in operated stifle joints, compared with unoperated stifle joints, at 1, 2, and 3 months. Serum KS concentrations increased from baseline values at 3 months after surgery. Hyaluronan concentrations in operated stifle joints were lower than baseline values at 1, 2, and 3 months. Urea-adjusted synovial fluid concentrations revealed that dilution did not account for the decline in biomarker concentrations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The initial decrease and subsequent increase in synovial fluid concentrations of HA and KS may be caused by an acute inflammatory response to surgical intervention that negatively affects cartilage metabolism or an increase in production of immature proteoglycans.

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate a 3-D kinematic model of the hind limb developed by use of a joint coordinate system in dogs.

Animals—6 clinically normal adult mixed-breed dogs.

Procedures—17 retroreflective markers were affixed to the skin on the right hind limb of each dog. Eight infrared cameras were arranged around a gait platform to record marker locations as dogs were recorded moving through the calibrated space 5 times during a walk and trot at velocities of 0.9 to 1.2 m/s and 1.7 to 2.1 m/s, respectively. Local and global coordinate systems were established, and a segmental rigid-body model of the canine hind limb was produced. Dynamic 3-D joint kinematic measurements were collected for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Results—Sagittal (flexion-extension), transverse (internal-external rotation), and frontal (abduction-adduction) plane kinematic measurements were acquired during each trial for the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—The joint coordinate system allowed acquisition of 3-D kinematic measurements of the hip, stifle, and tarsal joints of the canine hind limb. Methods were described to model 3-D joint motion of the canine hind limb. (Am J Vet Res 2010;71:1118-1122)

Full access
in American Journal of Veterinary Research