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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To report thoracolumbar caudal articular process malformations with secondary constrictive fibrosis of the spinal cord in Pugs.

Design—Retrospective case series.

Animals—11 Pugs with neurologic dysfunction resulting from constriction of fibrous tissue secondary to thoracolumbar caudal articular process malformation and 5 Pugs with no neurologic dysfunction.

Procedures—Medical records of dogs with myelopathy presumably caused by constriction of fibrous tissue secondary to thoracolumbar caudal articular process malformation at 2 referral institutions between 1993 and 2009 were reviewed. Dogs were included in the study if hypoplastic or aplastic thoracolumbar caudal articular processes were present on radiographs, CT images, or MRI images.

Results—The most common neurologic examination findings were paraparesis with ataxia or paraplegia but no evidence of hyperpathia along the vertebral column. All dogs' neurologic lesion localization was to the T3-L3 spinal cord segments. Median age at examination was 7. 7 years (range, 2 to 11 years). Five of 11 dogs had a history of unrelated trauma. Four of 11 dogs had urinary or fecal incontinence. Eight of 11 dogs underwent surgical exploration. Despite surgical intervention, all dogs that survived surgery continued to have neurologic deficits.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In the present study, presence of aplastic or hypoplastic articular processes in the thoracolumbar region did not always produce neurologic signs. However, fibrous constrictive myelopathy should be considered in Pugs with pelvic limb gait and postural reaction deficits and lack of hyperpathia upon palpation of the vertebral column. Additional studies are warranted to further characterize the disease process and determine the most effective means of treatment.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Objective—

To evaluate efficacy and safety of the calcium channel antagonist nimodipine in dogs with idiopathic epilepsy.

Design—

Prospective clinical trial.

Animals—

10 dogs with idiopathic epilepsy. Dogs were included if seizures were inadequately controlled despite treatment with barbiturates and serum phenobarbital concentrations were > 25 μg/ml, if dogs had intolerable adverse effects when treated with barbiturates, or if dogs had mild, inadequately treated seizures.

Procedures—

Dogs were treated with nimodipine (2.5 mg/kg [1.1 mg/lb] of body weight. PO, q 12 h), and other medications were slowly withdrawn. Dogs were monitored for seizure frequency and severity as well as any adverse effects to the medication.

Results—

Few adverse effects were reported. Seizure control, however, was generally inadequate. All but 2 dogs were withdrawn from the study because of poor seizure control. Plasma nimodipine concentrations were low, with a mean peak concentration of 105.3 ng/ml.

Clinical Implications—

Nimodipine was not successful in controlling seizures in dogs used in this study. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 1997;210:1298–1301)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association