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Abstract

Objective—To determine the effect of number of blood samples and sampling times on plasma clearance of technetium Tc 99m pentetate (Tc99mP) and orthoiodohippurate sodium I 131(OIH).

Animals—20 dogs and 14 cats.

Procedure—Plasma clearances of OIH and Tc99mP were calculated by use of a 2-compartment model, on the basis of a 12-point curve as a reference method. Plasma clearance was calculated by use of all possible combinations of 4 to 11 samples. Time schedule yielding the smallest difference from the reference method was considered to be optimal. Regression analysis was performed between the 12-point model and models using a reduced number of samples.

Results—SD of the difference between the 12-point clearance and the models with reduced numbers of samples increased when the number of samples decreased. The SD of the difference between 12-point clearance and 4-point clearance was 4.17 ml/min for OIH and 0.94 ml/min for Tc99mP in dogs and 0.45 ml/min for OIH and 0.11 ml/min for Tc99mP in cats. Optimal schedules were distributed logarithmically and included an early sample at 5 or 10 minutes, a late sample at 2.5, 3, 4, or 5 hours for OIH, and a late sample at 4 or 5 hours for Tc99mP.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Plasma clearances of OIH and Tc99mP can be accurately calculated in dogs and cats by use of a single-injection 2-compartment pharmacologic model with a reduced number of blood samples, resulting in an acceptable margin of error. (Am J Vet Res 2000;61:280–285)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research
in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To compare the effects of propofol and sevoflurane on the urethral pressure profile in female dogs.

Animals—10 healthy female dogs.

Procedure—Urethral pressure profilometry was performed in awake dogs, during anesthesia with sevoflurane at 1.5, 2.0, and 3.0% end-tidal concentration, and during infusion of propofol at rates of 0.4, 0.8, and 1.2 mg/kg/min. A consistent plane of anesthesia was maintained for each anesthetic protocol. Maximum urethral pressure, maximum urethral closure pressure, functional profile length, and functional area were measured.

Results—Mean maximum urethral closure pressure of awake dogs was not significantly different than that of dogs anesthetized with propofol at all infusion rates or with sevoflurane at 1.5 and 2.0% end-tidal concentration. Functional area in awake dogs was significantly higher than in anesthetized dogs. Functional area of dogs during anesthesia with sevoflurane at 3.0% end-tidal concentration was significantly lower than functional area for other anesthetic protocols. Individual differences in the magnitude of effects of propofol and sevoflurane on urethral pressures were observed.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Sevoflurane is an alternative to propofol for anesthesia in female dogs undergoing urethral pressure profilometry. Use of these anesthetics at appropriate administration rates should reliably distinguish normal from abnormal maximum urethral closure pressures and functional areas. Titration of anesthetic depth is a critical component of urodynamic testing. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1288–1292)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research

Abstract

Objective—To examine acid-base and hormonal abnormalities in dogs with diabetes mellitus.

Design—Cross-sectional study.

Animals—48 dogs with diabetes mellitus and 17 healthy dogs.

Procedures—Blood was collected and serum ketone, glucose, lactate, electrolytes, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, epinephrine, norepinephrine, nonesterified fatty acid, and triglyceride concentrations were measured. Indicators of acid-base status were calculated and compared between groups.

Results—Serum ketone and glucose concentrations were significantly higher in diabetic than in healthy dogs, but there was no difference in venous blood pH or base excess between groups. Anion gap and strong ion difference were significantly higher and strong ion gap and serum bicarbonate concentration were significantly lower in the diabetic dogs. There were significant linear relationships between measures of acid-base status and serum ketone concentration, but not between measures of acid-base status and serum lactate concentration. Serum insulin concentration did not differ significantly between groups, but diabetic dogs had a wider range of values. All diabetic dogs with a serum ketone concentration > 1,000 μmol/L had a serum insulin concentration < 5 μU/mL. There were strong relationships between serum ketone concentration and serum glucagon-insulin ratio, serum cortisol concentration, and plasma norepinephrine concentration. Serum β-hydroxybutyrate concentration, expressed as a percentage of serum ketone concentration, decreased as serum ketone concentration increased.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Results suggested that ketosis in diabetic dogs was related to the glucagon-insulin ratio with only low concentrations of insulin required to prevent ketosis. Acidosis in ketotic dogs was attributable largely to high serum ketone concentrations.

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To evaluate transurethral cystoscopy and excretory urography for diagnosis of ectopic ureter in female dogs and identify concurrent urogenital abnormalities.

Design—Retrospective study.

Animals—25 female dogs.

Procedure—Medical records of female dogs that underwent transurethral cystoscopy, excretory urography, and ventral cystotomy were reviewed for signalment, history, physical examination findings, results of bacteriologic culture of urine, and surgical findings. Videotapes of transurethral cystoscopy and radiographic studies were reviewed systematically without knowledge of surgical findings.

Results—Ectopic ureters were diagnosed in 24 of 25 (96%) of the dogs, bilaterally in 22 of 24 (91.6%) dogs. Cystoscopic evaluation yielded a correct diagnosis in all dogs when results of ventral cystotomy were used as the diagnostic standard. Cystoscopic evaluation identified a terminal ureteral opening for all ureters. Urethral fenestrations, troughs, striping, and tenting were identified. Abnormalities of the vestibule were identified in all examinations available for review (24/25). The paramesonephric septal remnant and its association with ectopic ureters were identified and characterized by cystoscopy. Radiographic findings were discordant with surgical findings and correctly identified 36 of 46 (78.2%) ectopic ureters and 2 of 4 normal ureters. Hydroureter and renal abnormalities were associated with distal urethral ectopic ureters on radiographic evaluations.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—Transurethral cystoscopy was accurate and minimally invasive for identification and classification of ectopic ureters in dogs. Contrast radiography had limitations in diagnosis of ectopic ureters. Cystoscopic findings and associated vaginal and vestibular abnormalities support abnormal embryologic development in the pathogenesis of ectopic ureters. (J Am Vet Med Assoc 2003;223:475–481)

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in Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association

Abstract

Objective—To determine maximum extrarenal plasma clearance of technetium-99m-mercaptoacetyltriglycine (99mTc–MAG3) and maximum extrarenal hepatic uptake of 99mTc–MAG3 in cats.

Animals—6 clinically normal adult cats.

Procedure—Simultaneously, baseline plasma clearance and camera-based uptake of 99mTc–MAG3 were determined in anesthetized cats. Double exponential curves were fitted to plasma clearance data. Injected dose was divided by area under the curve and body weight to determine 99mTc–MAG3 clearance. Regions of interest were drawn around kidneys and liver, and percentage dose uptake was determined 1 to 3 minutes after injection. After bilateral nephrectomy, simultaneous extrarenal plasma clearance and camera- based hepatic uptake of 99mTc–MAG3 were evaluated in each cat.

Results—Mean ± SD baseline plasma clearance and extrarenal clearance were 5.29 ± 0.77 and 0.84 ± 0.47 mL/min/kg, respectively. Mean extrarenal clearance (as a percentage of baseline plasma clearance) was 16.06 ± 7.64%. For right, left, and both kidneys, mean percentage dose uptake was 9.42 ± 2.58, 9.37 ± 0.86, and 18.79 ± 2.47%, respectively. Mean hepatic percentage dose uptake before and after nephrectomy was 12.95 ± 0.93 and 21.47 ± 2.00%, respectively. Mean percentage change of hepatic uptake after nephrectomy was 166.89 ± 23.19%.

Conclusions and Clinical Relevance—In cats, extrarenal clearance of 99mTc–MAG3 is higher than that of other species; therefore, 99mTc–MAG3 is not useful for estimation of renal function in felids. Evaluation of renal function in cats may be more accurate via camera- based versus plasma clearance-based methods because camera-based studies can discriminate specific organs. (Am J Vet Res 2003;64:1076–1080)

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in American Journal of Veterinary Research